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publishing a paper......

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by LadyLuck, Nov 27, 2002.

  1. LadyLuck

    LadyLuck Member
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    Okay, so here's kind of a dumb question. How big of a deal is it for an undergrad. to have scientific research published? I remember reading a thread a loooong time ago (I havn't been around too much lately) that quite a few of you have had research published. So my question then, is how do med schools see that? Is it fairly common, or not? Thanks in advance, you guys are great :D
     
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  3. Random Access

    Random Access 1K Member
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    Not sure. Probably depends on your role. I mean, some of my friends are like 4th/5th/6th authors, and one of them (who is maybe 5th or so) sort of knows what research was done (he did mostly computer analysis stuff, so wasn't involved in the data collection). And this one girl I know is 1st author on one, but her dad wrote it basically and put her as 1st and him as 2nd. It all depends on what you did and how well you can explain it, I'd think.

    Remember that the topic could be a research interest of one of your interviewers, so you could get asked detailed questions in theory.
     
  4. Gleevec

    Gleevec Peter, those are Cheerios
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    Research oriented med schools like publications I would imagine, and if you have demonstrated an interest in academia/research they would definitely see it as a bonus. Also remember, that the level of authorship (what author # you are), matters.
    If you are not a big fan of research, and are say, of volunteering, med schools wont hold it against you especially if you dont want a research oriented career.

    But yeah, getting your research published is a pretty good feeling, and if you want enter academia like I do, I think its a pretty important aspect of an application.
     
  5. Gleevec

    Gleevec Peter, those are Cheerios
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    Good point, interviewers will DEFINITELY grill you on your research. Not only fine points of the actual paper, but background information, etc.

     
  6. LadyLuck

    LadyLuck Member
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    I would be first author on it, and there would be two, on different subjects (of course). It is basically on the behavior of some freshwater animals I am working with, and the scientist I have been working with is apparently pretty famous in his field and used to be a professor at one of my dream schools before getting recruited to U Milwaukee. I'm not expecting to apply to med school until 2005/06 and the whole "process part" of it, and what is good to have on an application is kind of new to me. I really feel lucky to have this research opportunity and I am learning a lot, but everything is happening so fast. Forgive me if I sound naive and Thanks again!
     
  7. dr. deez

    dr. deez Senior Member
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    Research publications can be a very positive thing on your CV... this being said... you should be able to defend the work that you did as well as be prepared to relate it to how it will help you as a MD/medical student (or explain how it is clinically relevant)... that is the most important aspect that schools are interested in... not how many publications or graduate degrees you have. GOOD JOB and congrats on getting published! good luck
    -DD-
     
  8. RT

    RT Rt
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    Congratulations. Med schools love it. Research experience is the baseline; however, it's not research until it's published. The number of publications counts. The number of primary authorships counts much more, but seek balance between the two since productivity relates greatly to getting published. Research knowledge is a given. It is a professional expectation regardless of the order of authorship.

    Nevertheless, research makes only part of a well-rounded student. If you're ambitious, make yourself whole.

    Rt
     
  9. LadyLuck

    LadyLuck Member
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    I just wanted to say thanks to all of you. I am so happy that I can turn to a group of positive and enthusiastic people for advice :) pretty much all of you are alot further ahead of me in this game, and I really value your input. Not trying to be too mushy, just appreciative. Not even close to publishing yet, but my mentor has this "ideal" that I can do it, so I guess I need to start making that ideal my own and get to work!!
     
  10. ItNeverEnds

    ItNeverEnds Senior Member
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    Do research if you enjoy it. I know many medical students who didn't publish papers and who didn't have any problem getting into med school.

    As discussed above, if you enjoy research and want to ultimately pursue a career in it, pubs are great!

    I published a paper (first author) as an undergrad which was on psychophysiological sex differences in human jealousy. I am currently an MPH student, and have published a book chapter (second of two authors) on comorbidity of substance use and pathological gambling, and have a paper in press on disordered gambling in adolescents (first author). I plan to apply to medical school for 2004 admission. Honestly, pubs can only help you in admissions, especially if your GPA and MCAT are competitive, you have some clinical experience, and you enjoyed the research you have done.

    Cheers,

    INE
     
  11. dsomme

    dsomme Junior Member
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    While I do not doubt that research, especially publication, benefits you greatly in the admissions process, many schools also look for clinical experience. Here is a FAQ from the U. Wisc med school site:

    How important is research experience for admission?

    Although research experience is valuable, it should not substitute for experiences with clinical medicine. The exception to this is for MD/PhD program applicants, who should have research experience as well as clinical medicine experience.


    Just my $0.02.

    -dsomme
     

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