KellyMBAtoMD

10+ Year Member
May 12, 2008
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Hi there SDN!

As you can tell from my name, I am not very involved or familiar with the medical field. I was a finance major in college, got my MBA, and now I am taking my pre-requisites as I've decided to change careers and pursue a career in medicine.

During taking my pre-requisites I've been lucky enough to land a research job doing stem cell research for a large university! I am learning different techniques and procedures now, so I am in the very beginning stages, but I have a few questions about research in general.

What is the process of getting a publication? You do research for a certain amount of time (I know this can be from 1 - an unlimited amount of years) and then what... you write up your results?

What is the process for submitting to a journal? Can you submit to any journal? Can you submit at any time of the year?

How long does it take from when you submit --> to when it is actually published. I know you might get your article sent back for revisions, but how long typically is that process.

Also, must you present at a conference to get published?

What does presenting at a conference do exactly?

I am just curious about the process because I am not familiar. I am not necessarily banking on ever getting published, but I will be with this lab for 2 years and I was just wondering what the process was like.

Thank you for your advice!!
 

Maxprime

Higgs chaser
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Nov 28, 2005
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This can be explained much better and in greater detail by someone in your lab - but you usually only learn this the first time you are publishing something.

Basically, you write up your results and submit the paper to a journal. It's then either rejected/accepted (usually requiring changes) and published. You can submit to any journal, but a high quality journal isn't going to publish lame research. Each journal has different deadlines, timelines, & formats. You don't have to present at a conference to get published - for starters, presenting at a conference is something you can put on your CV.
 

BluePhoenix

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Mar 17, 2007
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What is the process of getting a publication? You do research for a certain amount of time (I know this can be from 1 - an unlimited amount of years) and then what... you write up your results?
Publication happens when you get enough data to give you some amount of substantial results. There's no real timetable. Some papers are the result of several days of work, other papers take years for all the data to be collected and processed. It really depends on your experiments and how well they turn out. But pretty much you have to show something new or novel about your subject and write it up all nicely with your proof of why what you think is true really is true. You also have to do a bunch of literature searches to find supporting research and background information and everything that you'll need in the paper as well.

What is the process for submitting to a journal? Can you submit to any journal? Can you submit at any time of the year?
Some journals require you to inquire if the journal is interested, other journals you just submit when you've got a nice manuscript written out. You can submit to any journal, but in general you want to make sure your paper matches both the subject area and the impact level of the journal. We all want to publish in Nature, but not all papers belong there. If you're not familiar with the field, your PI will probably tell you where you're submitting it, and you can use previous articles from there to see examples of the format and writing style you'll want to use for your paper. You can submit any time you want. It's not exactly a fast process though, so be prepared to wait.

How long does it take from when you submit --> to when it is actually published. I know you might get your article sent back for revisions, but how long typically is that process.
Well, first you have to make it past the editors, which can be fast or slow depending on your paper, how famous your PI is, and who your PI knows there. For some places, this first step can have odds around 1 in 10 or less. If it passes the editors, they send it to some number of reviewers who read the paper and decide if they think it should be published. If you past that (maybe 50:50 odds) then they'll send it back to you with comments and questions and you kinda go back and forth until they accept the paper, reject the paper, or ask you to do more experiments. The speed of this can be several months depending on how busy your reviewers are and how quickly they get things back to you...and also what they want you to do to your paper.

Also, must you present at a conference to get published?

What does presenting at a conference do exactly?
No, a talk or poster presentation is sorta a publication and occasionally a conference will also bind together the abstracts submitted into a book. Typically, if you're presenting a poster, it means you make a poster ( 3'x4' usually) with pictures and plots from your research along with some blurbys explaining it and then for several hours you'll stand next to it and talk about it to people that are interested. Talks are well...talks. You get some amount of time (10 min to 30 min usually) and you'll make a bunch of power point slides and give a presentation on your research and then people will ask you questions about it. Neither is too painful and both are pretty easy to do by simply submitting an abstract to a conference - most have a pretty high acceptance rate. Your PI can probably show you some examples or probably has some of the poster hanging up around the lab.
 
OP
K

KellyMBAtoMD

10+ Year Member
May 12, 2008
8
0
Status
Non-Student
Publication happens when you get enough data to give you some amount of substantial results. There's no real timetable. Some papers are the result of several days of work, other papers take years for all the data to be collected and processed. It really depends on your experiments and how well they turn out. But pretty much you have to show something new or novel about your subject and write it up all nicely with your proof of why what you think is true really is true. You also have to do a bunch of literature searches to find supporting research and background information and everything that you'll need in the paper as well.



Some journals require you to inquire if the journal is interested, other journals you just submit when you've got a nice manuscript written out. You can submit to any journal, but in general you want to make sure your paper matches both the subject area and the impact level of the journal. We all want to publish in Nature, but not all papers belong there. If you're not familiar with the field, your PI will probably tell you where you're submitting it, and you can use previous articles from there to see examples of the format and writing style you'll want to use for your paper. You can submit any time you want. It's not exactly a fast process though, so be prepared to wait.



Well, first you have to make it past the editors, which can be fast or slow depending on your paper, how famous your PI is, and who your PI knows there. For some places, this first step can have odds around 1 in 10 or less. If it passes the editors, they send it to some number of reviewers who read the paper and decide if they think it should be published. If you past that (maybe 50:50 odds) then they'll send it back to you with comments and questions and you kinda go back and forth until they accept the paper, reject the paper, or ask you to do more experiments. The speed of this can be several months depending on how busy your reviewers are and how quickly they get things back to you...and also what they want you to do to your paper.



No, a talk or poster presentation is sorta a publication and occasionally a conference will also bind together the abstracts submitted into a book. Typically, if you're presenting a poster, it means you make a poster ( 3'x4' usually) with pictures and plots from your research along with some blurbys explaining it and then for several hours you'll stand next to it and talk about it to people that are interested. Talks are well...talks. You get some amount of time (10 min to 30 min usually) and you'll make a bunch of power point slides and give a presentation on your research and then people will ask you questions about it. Neither is too painful and both are pretty easy to do by simply submitting an abstract to a conference - most have a pretty high acceptance rate. Your PI can probably show you some examples or probably has some of the poster hanging up around the lab.

WOW! Thank you so much! What a great and fantastic, fast response! So helpful :)
 

ysk1

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Aug 24, 2007
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So, if you were to publish in a paper, do you first need to finish a complete version of your paper on your own?

Also, can you submit a paper simultaneously to more than one journal?
If you do that and more than one journal accepts your paper, then do you need to reject all others and choose only one journal you want your paper to be in?
 

Pinkertinkle

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Oct 16, 2003
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So, if you were to publish in a paper, do you first need to finish a complete version of your paper on your own?

Also, can you submit a paper simultaneously to more than one journal?
If you do that and more than one journal accepts your paper, then do you need to reject all others and choose only one journal you want your paper to be in?
Yup you need a manuscript that tells a pretty interesting and complete story before you submit it.

It's a big no no to submit it to more than one journal, because that would result in a lot of peer reviewers wasting their time.