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MikeUtica

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I don't want to be too specific as to what I am thinking, but at this point in time one thing I have realized is that I am a very creative person. I was sort of pushed into medicine, and have obviously invested many years in schooling and residency, and I see it really hard to run away from it at this point in time and start all over again from scratch. Medicine many times doesn't allow me to exploit all of my creativity. I fell that I am doing myself a great disservice if I don't use the muse. I was considering about going to a film school after residency training, and maybe try to apply/ bring some of the things I learn from it to the field. However, I am not sure whether this would be looked down in the same way a person that pursues an MBA, MPH or some other degree. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated? Is this something feasible? Does it sound insane?
 

dragonfly99

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I think your question is confusing.

Are you asking whether film schools will look down on you as a film school applicant, or whether other doctors will look down on you? I think you'd have to ask film schools to know the answer to the former. I don't see why it would hurt you, but I don't know.

I also don't understand what you mean by doctors with MBA's or MPH degrees being looked down on. I don't know of any reasonable number of doctors who look down on other doctors who have these degrees. Mostly, I don't know which other doctors have extra degrees like an MBA, MPH or MS, etc. It just doesn't normally come up in conversation. Some docs look down on other docs who no longer practice clinical medicine (including some MBA's) either out of jealousy or feeling that these docs shouldn't have abandoned patient care. But that is neither here nor there to me...I personally don't much care what most other people think of me (save good friends, family and some bosses and other coworkers).

One thing to consider is if you do film school you'll probably want to keep working some limited amount of clinical hours as a physician to keep up your skills at least minimally. Otherwise it would be hard to fall back on medicine if you need to later. However, it's usually pretty easy to find moonlighting gigs, at least in some specialties (i.e. family practice, internal med, radiology, ER).
 
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sirus_virus

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I don't want to be too specific as to what I am thinking, but at this point in time one thing I have realized is that I am a very creative person. I was sort of pushed into medicine, and have obviously invested many years in schooling and residency, and I see it really hard to run away from it at this point in time and start all over again from scratch. Medicine many times doesn't allow me to exploit all of my creativity. I fell that I am doing myself a great disservice if I don't use the muse. I was considering about going to a film school after residency training, and maybe try to apply/ bring some of the things I learn from it to the field. However, I am not sure whether this would be looked down in the same way a person that pursues an MBA, MPH or some other degree. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated? Is this something feasible? Does it sound insane?

I have an MBA and I have not gotten any sense that people look down on it. I am sure MPH is a well respected degree too. More importantly, why care what people think about what you want to do with your time and life. Film school is costly, and the industry is competitive, so watchout. Good luck.
 
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Winged Scapula

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Have you investigated the competitiveness of film school?

Once upon a time, in another life, I did. I talked with the Zanucks to get some advice and while they were encouraging, they opened my eyes to the difficulties of someone without nepotism or carrying around a Super 8 at age 7 (like Spielberg did) would face to get into film school.

Still, sometimes I dream about it and then I wake up and realize for every Spielberg or even Kevin Smith there are a thousand John Doe film school grads and even more who couldn't even get into film school.

At any rate, I've never heard of physicians looking down on someone with an advanced degree; as dragonfly notes, I rarely know who even has one.
 

medicienne

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The other day I was talking to a Program Director who mentioned that one of her star residents quit and left for film school!

So it seems you are not the first ;)

I think there's absolutely nothing wrong in following your passion, and the last thing that should govern your choice of career is what people think of you, right?
 

Spleen

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Go for it. Life is short. Find happiness.

I suggest like the person above to stay in practice minimally.

And additional idea is to combine the two. Film procedures with a teaching perspective. Have you seen some of the NEJM procedure how to vids? They leave some details out and could use some higher quality. Now imagine doing that for OR procedures. You could make a film textbook.

Imagine this: MikeUtica. Film Textbook of Surgery. 2nd Edition!!

Or focus on medical student entry level material. Like physical diagnosis. Almost an entire PD course could be tought by video to shore up the little details docs sometimes leave out.

Try to get contracts with the gov to do health commercials like the anti-tobacco ads. Show what happens to your kidneys when you disrespect the glucose gods., etc.

Another idea is to offer a service to do film autobiographies. We all have photos of old dead relatives and a few stories to go with them but your still left wondering who were they? With film we can document a good summary of an individual for generations to come. Thus relieveing the anxiety of will we be remembered as we approach death. I wish I had a video summary like that of a recently deceased grandmother who was amazing. I would love to show my future kids this as a way to show a little more about who their great grandmother was. And as a physician I would like to think you would have the compassion and trustworthiness to illicit the business of your target audience (the elderly and terminal). I hear hospice docs are some of the happiest around - you would likely work with the same population.

Middle/high school medical education videos. Make them worth watching.
 

marshmallows

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Have you investigated the competitiveness of film school?


Still, sometimes I dream about it and then I wake up and realize for every Spielberg or even Kevin Smith there are a thousand John Doe film school grads and even more who couldn't even get into film school.

At any rate, I've never heard of physicians looking down on someone with an advanced degree; as dragonfly notes, I rarely know who even has one.

It's not only the getting into film school. that is not the hardest part at all. For every successful (meaning being paid to film/act etc. in movies and paid well) film school graduate, there are many thousand that can't get any paid work. The competition in being successful in that business is much harder than the competition in medicine. But if money isn't the issue as much then I would do it; as long as I had some money to survive, if that is what I loved most.
 

Winged Scapula

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It's not only the getting into film school. that is not the hardest part at all. For every successful (meaning being paid to film/act etc. in movies and paid well) film school graduate, there are many thousand that can't get any paid work. The competition in being successful in that business is much harder than the competition in medicine. But if money isn't the issue as much then I would do it; as long as I had some money to survive, if that is what I loved most.

Uhmmm...I think if you read my second paragraph (in the response you quoted) you will see that I addressed this issue as well.
 

NobodysHero

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What about filmmaking interests you? Directing, producing, writing, acting, production design?

It also depends on what film school you're thinking. Many schools have film programs, but if you're thinking USC, NYU, or UT, then yeah, it's not going to be easy.

Even then, film school only takes you so far. There's a very specific path to becoming a doctor. College>Med School>Residency/Fellowship>Doctor. It's not the same with filmmaking. Some people go to very prestigious film schools and still haven't gotten their "big break," and there's no guarantee that they ever will. Others have never taken a single film class and have gone on to become very successful.

I guess what I'm trying to say is make sure something like film school will be really helpful because it's a lot of time, money and energy that could all result in nothing.
 

marshmallows

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Uhmmm...I think if you read my second paragraph (in the response you quoted) you will see that I addressed this issue as well.



ooh, i guess i didn't see that part when reading before. good call.

it def is much harder and rarer to be successful in the film business than in medicine,, but if you are one of the very few, it's so much funner... IMO..:smuggrin:
 
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