Q? for All International Student.

Discussion in 'General International Discussion' started by WanabeDR, Jul 3, 2001.

  1. WanabeDR

    WanabeDR Senior Member

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    Hi everyone, I just want to ask you; Did anyone of you had chosen to go MD (IMG) over DO school in USA based on this information (E-mail respond from AACOM)?? If not, please explain to me why? (Did you choose Caribbean MD, instead retaking the MCAT and try to re-apply for US DO?). Here is the E-mail :rolleyeyes:
    Thank you for your inquiry regarding osteopathic physicians practicing in other countries. The American Osteopathic Association in its 2000/01 Yearbook and Directory of Osteopathic Physicians details the current status of licensure for US trained osteopathic physicians seeking practice rights abroad. According to the Yearbook (p. 716): this summary of licensure availability in foreign countries for United States osteopathic medical school graduates is revised and expanded on a continual basis. Some countries have definite policies regarding either the licensure of internationally-trained physicians and health care practitioners and/or the licensure of noncitizens. A few countries have consistently refused to grant US-trained DOs full practice rights, often permitting them to perform only manipulation and sometimes refusing to grant them any type of practice. Other countries, however, are simply not educated on the qualifications of US-trained DOs. . . .

    Many countries which were or continue to be under British influence adhere to Britain's definition of an "osteopath," a non-physician health care practitioner who practices only manipulation. Due to the similarity of the titles, many of these countries refuse to grant US-trained DOs practice rights beyond the scope of manipulation.

    Further, the procedure by which international countries consider granting physician licensure to foreigners is not consistent among all countries. The procedure can take the form of a simple interview with a Minister of Health or Medical Board, a handshake with a governmental insider or the submission to a battery of examinations, intensive residencies and the like.

    Also, the intent and type of practice sought by the US-trained DO might warrant a substantially different application procedure. For example, those who are interested in working on a volunteer basis or for a mission often find the process less hindered by paperwork and legal regulations. . . .

    [The AOA maintains] a catalog of countries in which the AOA has investigated osteopathic licensure. Included in each country's listing is the year in which the last request for updated licensure status was made, the scope of osteopathic practice in that country, an overview of issues specific to that country and the contact for licensure inquiries. . . .

    Should you wish to investigate licensure possibilities in a country or would like to know more information regarding one of the listed countries, please contact the AOA Division of State Government Affairs, 142 East Ontario Street, Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 621-1773 ext. 8184.

    In Canada the following provinces offer an unlimited scope of practice to osteopathic physicians: Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, and Quebec. Ontario and Saskatchewan both limit osteopathic physicians to the practice of osteopathic manipulative medicine. The Yearbook states that "all the provinces that have provisions for licensing DOs as physicians require that DOs be graduates of AOA-accredited osteopathic medical colleges and that they be or intend to become Canadian citizens." Several provinces have no provisions for licensing of US-trained DOs. These provinces are: Manitoba, Newfoundland, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and the Yukon Territory. The Yearbook states, however, that "although [these provinces and territories] do not have provisions for licensing US-trained DOs, osteopathic physicians may be able to obtain practice rights on a case-by-case basis."

    Thank you for your advising your students about osteopathic medicine. If you or your students have further questions about international licensure, please contact the AOA Division of State Government Affairs, 142 East Ontario Street, Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 621-1773; http://www.aoa-net.org.
     
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  3. WanabeDR

    WanabeDR Senior Member

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    :eek: WOW, thanks for the reply guys :rolleyes:. I guess you guys don't give damn of this TOPIC haa :mad:. Good to know your opinion anyway ;)
     
  4. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    No. I chose to go to a foreign MD school over a US MD school.

    Hope this helps get you some responses!
     
  5. Stephen Ewen

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    If you are wishing to practice abraod as primary you may do very well by going abroad to train. What are your practicing plans?
     
  6. hello i'm new to this, i'm a med student in saudi arabia and want to find out what is requied to finish my studies in the us knowing that i have a us pasport..thanx
     

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