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Question about changing out of IM residency

Discussion in 'Internal Medicine and IM Subspecialties' started by DocK, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. DocK

    DocK Junior Member

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    How difficult is it to switch out of IM? I'm currently in my third year; have heard that it is easier in terms of Medicare funding to switch residencies rather than try to start a second residency after finishing IM. Anyone know how true this is?
     
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  3. why may I ask are you switching out?
     
  4. DocK

    DocK Junior Member

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    Because I'm not satisfied with my options at this point: general internist and the other medicine specialties are not as appealing
     
  5. Sheerstress

    Sheerstress Senior Member
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    The way I understand it, your funding is determined by your initial residency period, basically whatever speciality you step into out of medical school. Since you went into internal medicine, you have 3 full years of funding. Any training beyond those three years will only be reimbursed with half the funding.

    So if you were to immediately switch into a different specialty, you would have 10.5 months of full funding remaining (assuming you started in July 2004), after which your new program would only get reimbursed by half. If you were to stay on and finish your IM residency in 2007, obviously you would use up those 10.5 months. That may be the logic behind what you heard.

    The importance of Medicare funding depends on the specialty you're trying to get into (some of the more competitive ones use it to screen applicants). However keep in mind that it is only one factor among many. You should probably talk to an advisor (a program director in your desired specialty would probably be best) to see how important funding is, and whether in your case it will affect the playing field for you.
     

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