Ludacris

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What is the rhythm for 2nd degree AV block Type 2, and 3rd degree AV block (complete heart block)?

I know 2nd degree AV block Type 1 is Regularly Irregular.

Thanks! :scared:
 
Oct 9, 2010
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What is the rhythm for 2nd degree AV block Type 2, and 3rd degree AV block (complete heart block)?

I know 2nd degree AV block Type 1 is Regularly Irregular.

Thanks! :scared:
(somebody correct me if I'm wrong)


2nd degree block type I is when the pr wave will progressively lengthen at times and then you drop a ventricular beat/qrs when it gets too long

2nd degree type ii is the bad one since you're on the edge of progressing to type 3. it can be regularly irregular where you have 2 p waves for every 1 qrs

3rd degree block is when your atria and ventricles are no longer coordinated (av node is just completely fails on you) so the ekg is completely irregular (no pattern between p wave and qrs complex)
 

Dwindlin

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(somebody correct me if I'm wrong)


2nd degree block type I is when the pr wave will progressively lengthen at times and then you drop a ventricular beat/qrs when it gets too long

2nd degree type ii is the bad one since you're on the edge of progressing to type 3. it can be regularly irregular where you have 2 p waves for every 1 qrs

3rd degree block is when your atria and ventricles are no longer coordinated (av node is just completely fails on you) so the ekg is completely irregular (no pattern between p wave and qrs complex)
For the 2nd degree, the easiest way I had it explained was it has a stable PR interval but dropped QRS complexes.

Complete block can still be regular, there is just no longer any coordination between the P and QRS (as you said). However if you track the P waves, and QRS complexes independently they are likely fairly regular.
 

pianoman511

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Also, remember all of the AV blocks are bradycardia by definition. That's one of the easiest ways to start narrowing down what the rhythm is.
 
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For the 2nd degree, the easiest way I had it explained was it has a stable PR interval but dropped QRS complexes.
2nd degree type I can show unstable PR intervals prior to dropping the QRS (it can get longer and longer then drop the qrs)

Complete block can still be regular, there is just no longer any coordination between the P and QRS (as you said). However if you track the P waves, and QRS complexes independently they are likely fairly regular.
whoops yeah that's what i meant (sometimes see p before qrs, sometimes see qrs before p)

I always just think of Diagnosis Wenkebach
:laugh::love:
 

WellWornLad

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(somebody correct me if I'm wrong)

3rd degree block is when your atria and ventricles are no longer coordinated (av node is just completely fails on you) so the ekg is completely irregular (no pattern between p wave and qrs complex)
3rd degree rhythm is regular - it's known as ventricular rhythm/ventricular escape (as opposed to sinus rhythm). Both the P waves and the QRS will be regular, they'll just be going at different frequencies and are completely unrelated to each other (P waves at 60-100 bpm, QRS at 20-40 bpm).

The rhythm is always dictated by the QRS/ventricular contraction, not the P wave (although they're normally associated).
 

Dwindlin

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2nd degree type I can show unstable PR intervals prior to dropping the QRS (it can get longer and longer then drop the qrs)
Yeah, I forgot to designate type II in my post, thanks for catching that.