Oct 7, 2014
3
0
Status
Non-Student
Hi, I have a very random question that I'm hoping someone can help with. For background, I'm not a mental health professional, but I am researching historical EPPP passing score requirements, and Google brought me to this forum.

My understanding is that most states require a score of 70 to pass the exam, some require more. My question is, does anyone happen to know what the historical passing requirements were, specifically around the mid-1980s? I know they vary from state to state, but I'm just hoping for a general answer. Have they changed since then? I've also placed a call to the ASPPB and the person who I was told might know was not there and would not be for about a week, and I was hoping to get an answer quicker than that.

Also, if I'm basing any of this on any incorrect assumptions or information don't be afraid to correct me, or if there's another place I should seek out this information don't be afraid to let me know. Thank you all in advance!
 

OneNeuroDoctor

Clinical Neuropsychologist
5+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2013
690
116
Kansas City, MO
Status
Psychologist
In the search area type in EPPP and read these threads for questions you may have about the EPPP. I am curious about your interest in the EPPP?
 
OP
H
Oct 7, 2014
3
0
Status
Non-Student
Thank you! My interest is that I'm an attorney doing some research into an opposing psychology expert, and in mentioning this test a few other issues came up pertaining to the EPPP that I was going to be interested in questioning him about.
 

DynamicDidactic

Ass of Prof
7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2010
1,077
466
Status
Psychologist
Thank you! My interest is that I'm an attorney doing some research into an opposing psychology expert, and in mentioning this test a few other issues came up pertaining to the EPPP that I was going to be interested in questioning him about.
you should contact the state board to get this information.

Also, you may consider hiring a knowledgeable psychologist to go over the testimony of any psychologist you think is not competent.
 
OP
H
Oct 7, 2014
3
0
Status
Non-Student
I have another expert, but it may still go to his credibility. Mostly it's for background/curiosity.
 

OneNeuroDoctor

Clinical Neuropsychologist
5+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2013
690
116
Kansas City, MO
Status
Psychologist
A message board with mostly undergraduate and graduate students probably would not be ideal to present court evidence for credibility. You may need to consult with EPPP psychologists or one of the EPPP study programs to have factual and credible evidence.
I think a judge would throw out any information you present from a message board and this could result in you losing credibility as an attorney.