Dec 2, 2013
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Hello all, I am new to this forum and thanks for taking the time to read this! Eventually I decided to go for a medical field. I am not sure what to go for yet, but I want to take all the pre-requisities first such as General Chemistry, Biology, etc.

My question is instead of taking A&P1 and A&P2, could I take Anatomy seperately and Physiology seperately and will it count as A&P? The only reason this is because I happen to take Anatomy by itself before and its the same hours/credits as A&P1. If I just take Physiology by itself, than it has the same hours/credits as A&P2. So once finished they are all in same hours/credits.
For me I think taking seperately was clear just by itself, well again at least for me not for all.

Do any of you happen to know if this will work fine while going towards a Bacc University/college and if they will accept it as A&P ?

Thank you so much for you time!
 

DrMidlife

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Oct 30, 2006
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There are more difficult and less difficult anatomy & physiology courses. A&P is usually a nursing prereq, not a med school prereq. Unfortunately you can't take one set of courses as prereqs for all health professions programs.

Find the advising web pages for your school that describe the health professions prerequisites. Usually there's one set of classes for med/dent, and a different set of classes for nursing/pharm/PT/etc. You may want to look at the advising web pages for nearby universities as well.

If you're pursuing medical school, you may not be best served by taking sciences at a community college, unless you take additional science at university.

Best of luck to you.
 
OP
D
Dec 2, 2013
2
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
There are more difficult and less difficult anatomy & physiology courses. A&P is usually a nursing prereq, not a med school prereq. Unfortunately you can't take one set of courses as prereqs for all health professions programs.

Find the advising web pages for your school that describe the health professions prerequisites. Usually there's one set of classes for med/dent, and a different set of classes for nursing/pharm/PT/etc. You may want to look at the advising web pages for nearby universities as well.

If you're pursuing medical school, you may not be best served by taking sciences at a community college, unless you take additional science at university.

Best of luck to you.
Thanks for the response, I looked into it and the pre reqs are A&P1 and A&P2 (possibly going for PA or PT).
I was just wondering if taking the courses separately will hinder my chances. Would most colleges accept it? appreciate it
 
Apr 12, 2012
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What medical schools are you looking at? Most MD/DO programs require the following (a star denotes where there may be some variation). In all cases, advanced upper level classes may be substituted if you already have AP credit or other similar experience.

1 year general biology + lab
1 year general chemistry + lab
1 year organic chemistry + lab
1 year general physics* + lab (Harvard HST, and a minority of programs require calculus based physics over general introductory physics)
1 year English * - enormous variation in what qualifies; most just want to see that you have taken some non-science classes that have writing intensive components
1 semester of biochemistry* - not all schools require this, but more and more are. It is a must in my opinion, even if not technically required. You don't want your first exposure to biochem to be in medical school.
1 year of college mathematics * - some require a full year of calculus; others require 1 semester of statistics and 1 semester of calculus, others make statistics optional

Anatomy and physiology (MCAT level and the minimum required) is usually contained in the second semester of general biology where you learn about the form and function of parts of various organisms. Upper level courses will not hurt you, but make sure that you are not missing the prerequisites.