EyEnStein 07

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Im currently a highschool senior about to go to college.
I am having a very difficult time on which college to go to mainly because
after i got accepted to Fordham University i thought i would NOT have to worry, there fore i did not tell other schools such as stony brook, rutgers etc..
that i was going to go. However now that my family realized that going to Fordham would be a struggle because it is so expensive (we are getting no aid, so full tuition everywhere), i paid the Fordham Downpayment (as if i would attend) and told a city school that i would attend (as a backup incase i cant go to fordham).

My issue is will the school i go to really matter?
The only reason it matters to me because Fordham LC has lecture classes of 25-35 students...where as College has class sizes to intos of 800+. In my honest opinion i simply cannot learn in a class with 800 students, especially when 1 test determines your grade....Plus i have spoke to the Pre-Med Board in Fordham, and they have a respectable percentage of students that go to medical school. My goal is to either go into optometry(i know its in a different forum) or go on to med school for pediatrics or opthamology.

So any comments or suggestions? how did you guys go about choosing undergrad and did any of u go to a "regular" school and gave up a prestigious one?...(city school vs. fordham)
 
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Aidan

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Im currently a highschool senior about to go to college.
I am having a very difficult time on which college to go to mainly because
after i got accepted to Fordham University i thought i would NOT have to worry, there fore i did not tell other schools such as stony brook, rutgers etc..
that i was going to go. However now that my family realized that going to Fordham would be a struggle because it is so expensive (we are getting no aid, so full tuition everywhere), i paid the Fordham Downpayment (as if i would attend) and told CUNY Hunter College that i would attend (as a backup incase i cant go to fordham).

My issue is will the school i go to really matter?
The only reason it matters to me because Fordham LC has lecture classes of 25-35 students...where as Hunter College has class sizes to intos of 800+. In my honest opinion i simply cannot learn in a class with 800 students, especially when 1 test determines your grade....Plus i have spoke to the Pre-Med Board in Fordham, and they have a respectable percentage of students that go to medical school. My goal is to either go into optometry(i know its in a different forum) or go on to med school for pediatrics or opthamology.

So any comments or suggestions? how did you guys go about choosing undergrad and did any of u go to a "regular" school and gave up a prestigious one?...(hunter vs. fordham)
You said you can't learn in a classroom of 800 students, shouldn't that be your decision right there? If that won't work for you, and that's what that college does, then it should be crossed off your list, no? Your undergrad university won't matter a whole lot in med school applications. It's about your GPA, MCAT and extracurricular activities. I would go where you feel like you can fit, a small class size helps me too, so I would have picked the first one.

It's also spelled ophthalmology, sorry.. pet peeve. :D
 

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It sounds like you're hooked on Fordham. Once that happens, it's really hard to convince yourself about the good aspects of any other school.

Money is a real consideration. Are your parents putting you through college, or are you paying for yourself? When the money is your own, views can change drastically.

About the 800 student lectures - That IS a huge lecture room! Your learning won't depend just on that, though. There will be small groups with TA's, and you can ALWAYS form your own study groups. It's a good way to make friends, and good for learning new study methods. One advantage to large lectures is that you do have to take more of the initiative to learn material on your own. That ability will pay off through college, getting into med school, and in med school - a place where the ability to study and learn well independently is valuable skill.

The percentage of students who leave any particular university to go on to med school is not a true reflection of how well a school prepares its students. There are too many other factors involved, such as the percentage of serious students who have that as their goal. The most important key to getting there is your own efforts, in and outside of the classroom. In the end, it will be you who determine whether you are a competitive candidate, not the name or size of your school. If you have what it takes, you'll make it, no matter where you go to undergrad.
 

Isoprop

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some people have said that getting good letter of recs from a huge class is really difficult. i see it as the other way around. if you can stand out in a huge class, it's much more impressive on your LOR when your prof mentions how well you did out of a class of 800.
 

ChubbyChaser

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ummm why cant you learn with 800 kids??....its the same as a class with 25....go to class...professor lectures...take a test...pass the test...repeat


btw I got into Duke, Davidson,wake forest and UNC....and decided to attend a lesser ranked school for monetary reasons....I dont regret it at all.
 

Isoprop

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ummm why cant you learn with 800 kids??....its the same as a class with 25....go to class...professor lectures...take a test...pass the test...repeat
also, how do you know you can't learn in this type of environment? have you had a class in HS with 800 students?

i used to think big classes were a disadvantage... now i actually prefer them to smaller classes.
 
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EyEnStein 07

EyEnStein 07

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My parents are paying but i am getting NO financial aid, which means the money is coming out of our pockets and my mom really does not want to take out a loan, but i know that though we might be able to last for a while, we wont for 4 years especially with a tuition of 30k+ per year, CUNY hunter was my very very back up safety safety school, and its cheap like 5k per year.

Also do you guys not think that a school like Fordham would provide better research/volunteering opportunities and have better partnerships and facilities as oppose to a cuny school, which im sure has great resources but they have to accommodate at least 3,000 more students.


ISOprop and chubby chaser:

I take all AP classes right now, and i have a huge tendency to ask 100 questions, because thats just how i am. Once i get it i get it good, but if i dont i never will. A Class of 800 is most probably not the same as 25, for example w.e work is assigned is most likely to be checked over in a class of 25, where as a professor would probably not want to grade 800 papers on a regular basis. Again im just assuming + what i have heard.


Also how do i know i cant learn with 800 students...well i dont exactly because i have not, but again, i need to be able to ask the professor questions, also if i need extra help, honestly i would rather the professor help me then a professor telling me to go to the library to get help from there. The tight packed community of Fordham is something that really appealed to me.

With the LOR, um i kind of disagree. In my opinion, a professor that writes about you on a personal level meaning he knows who you are academically and non-academically, is much better than one who just talks about how in a class of 800, you were the star.

Again guys, these are just my comments, concerns and i guess frustrations. I do not go to college yet so obviously you all know so much better than I, thats why im asking so i hope none of you take what im saying the wrong way.
 

135892

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My parents are paying but i am getting NO financial aid, which means the money is coming out of our pockets and my mom really does not want to take out a loan, but i know that though we might be able to last for a while, we wont for 4 years especially with a tuition of 30k+ per year, CUNY hunter was my very very back up safety safety school, and its cheap like 5k per year.

Also do you guys not think that a school like Fordham would provide better research/volunteering opportunities and have better partnerships and facilities as oppose to a cuny school, which im sure has great resources but they have to accommodate at least 3,000 more students.


ISOprop and chubby chaser:

I take all AP classes right now, and i have a huge tendency to ask 100 questions, because thats just how i am. Once i get it i get it good, but if i dont i never will. A Class of 800 is most probably not the same as 25, for example w.e work is assigned is most likely to be checked over in a class of 25, where as a professor would probably not want to grade 800 papers on a regular basis. Again im just assuming + what i have heard.


Also how do i know i cant learn with 800 students...well i dont exactly because i have not, but again, i need to be able to ask the professor questions, also if i need extra help, honestly i would rather the professor help me then a professor telling me to go to the library to get help from there. The tight packed community of Fordham is something that really appealed to me.

With the LOR, um i kind of disagree. In my opinion, a professor that writes about you on a personal level meaning he knows who you are academically and non-academically, is much better than one who just talks about how in a class of 800, you were the star.

Again guys, these are just my comments, concerns and i guess frustrations. I do not go to college yet so obviously you all know so much better than I, thats why im asking so i hope none of you take what im saying the wrong way.
Oh man, you're one of those people that asks questions every two minutes... Yeah, do everyone a favor and don't do this in a large lecture class.

Anyways, despite what everyone warned me about attending such a large school with the 800 people type lecture courses, I actually found it to be not that bad. I just occasionally go to class and basically just learn the stuff on my own, and do fine. But, I'll have to admit that the smaller classes actually did help me to get more out of attending the class itself. The size of the classes should be one of the factors, but it really shouldn't be that huge of one. If you are a good student, I'm sure you can adapt to different learning environments (and it may even be beneficial for you to learn how to do this)
 

RySerr21

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ummm why cant you learn with 800 kids??....its the same as a class with 25....go to class...professor lectures...take a test...pass the test...repeat
ya totally........except not at all.

OP...... i go to a school with 1800 students. i have never been in a class w/ more than 30 students...that includes all my general bio, chem, physics crap. this semester, i had a course with only 6 people. in a course that small the individualized attentin that you get is unbelievable. and it makes a HUGE difference. its not just go to lecture, professor lectures, take test. my professor would give me the marker and tell me to go write on the board something we had talked about a week ago.

i'm the only one of my friends that went to a small school....all the other ones went to schools like berkeley, ucla, sdsu, etc.

the difference is astronomical and its something that you need to experience. i once had a professor email me to tell me she was dissapointed that i skippped class..... i almost pooed my pants. i had a professor come in to her office on Friday night at 7 PM b/c i was having trouble composing my blues composition. that does not happen at a large school, i am sorry. NO WAY. my very first college final ever was at 830 AM. i slept til 10. i ran across campus and got there as the professor was leaving. she knew who i was, she knew i was a good student, she could tell i was about to have a heart attack. she stayed and let me finish it. at a large school, i am **** out of luck, every single time.

to the other poster who tried to make the argument about being in a class with 800 students as a plus for a LOR...i can kinda see your point, but in reality thats not how it works. in a class of 800 at a good school, the chances of you being noticed are pretty slim. every week i see a thread here about troulbe finding a LOR. how people are having troulbe finding professors, they dont konw if they will remember them cuz it was a year ago...etc etc. if i needed to, i could ask for a LOR from every single professor that I took a course from. that includes freshman year first semester. i call most of the professors by their first name. i find it hard to believe that a school with 800 people per class fosters the same type of learning environment and potential to build close relationshiphs with professors as a school w/ 20 people per class. it just doesnt make any sense.

this is not a bash on large schools. if you try hard you will do fine no matter where you go. however, at a smaller school you will do things that you simply can not due at a larger school. if you wanna talk more aout the details, PM me.
 

kevster2001

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ya totally........except not at all.

OP...... i go to a school with 1800 students. i have never been in a class w/ more than 30 students...that includes all my general bio, chem, physics crap. this semester, i had a course with only 6 people. in a course that small the individualized attentin that you get is unbelievable. and it makes a HUGE difference. its not just go to lecture, professor lectures, take test. my professor would give me the marker and tell me to go write on the board something we had talked about a week ago.

i'm the only one of my friends that went to a small school....all the other ones went to schools like berkeley, ucla, sdsu, etc.

the difference is astronomical and its something that you need to experience. i once had a professor email me to tell me she was dissapointed that i skippped class..... i almost pooed my pants.

to the other poster who tried to make the argument about being in a class with 800 students as a plus for a LOR...i can kinda see your point, but in reality thats not how it works. in a class of 800 at a good school, the chances of you being noticed are pretty slim. every week i see a thread here about troulbe finding a LOR. how people are having troulbe finding professors, they dont konw if they will remember them cuz it was a year ago...etc etc. if i needed to, i could ask for a LOR from every single professor that I took a course from. that includes freshman year first semester. i call most of the professors by their first name. i find it hard to believe that a school with 800 people per class fosters the same type of learning environment and potential to build close relationshiphs with professors as a school w/ 20 people per class. it just doesnt make any sense.

this is not a bash on large schools. if you try hard you will do fine no matter where you go. however, at a smaller school you will do things that you simply can not due at a larger school.
Are you saying you know more about your gen chem subjects than your friends who went to bigger schools? And this will translate to better MCAT scorse?
 

Salsa45

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if i needed to, i could ask for a LOR from every single professor that I took a course from. that includes freshman year first semester.
This has been my experience as well. Not only does it help in LOR's, but I've actually had a prof bump my grade from an A- to an A without my even asking or saying anything, I didn't even know he had bumped it until I asked out of curiousity for the details on my grades after the exam, and he did this simply because he knew me and appreciated my work ethic throughout the semester. Out of 10 people in the class, I was the only one who routinely handed in the homework and occasionally came to office hours. Try and have that happen in a 800 person class.
 

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Are you saying you know more about your gen chem subjects than your friends who went to bigger schools? And this will translate to better MCAT scorse?
was that a joke? i hope so. if not, no i was not saying that all.
 

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was that a joke? i hope so. if not, no i was not saying that all.
Then, ultimately, does it really matter whether or not you attend a small school. You will learn the material just as well, and even at a large school, you can get to know some of your professors pretty well (although not all)
 

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my school has only sent like 3 students to med school in the past decade but i was reassured by a med school recruiter that that didn't really matter. i like my school anyway. the class sizes are great and the professors really care about the students. this school is and HBCU and it is ranked somewhat highly amongst other HBCUs but in the grand scheme of things, we are pretty lesser ranked. i chose this school for financial reasons as well and i think everything will turn out well for me.

p.s. i got accepted into fordham as well with a sizable scholarship and i gave it up...
 
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EyEnStein 07

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to salsa and ryserr, my thoughts agree with the information you guys are giving because, what your saying only seemed logical to me when i was thinking about these schools myself.

To gatorsbbal:

i was exaggerating about the 100 questions..and um honestly if the students are anything liek the ones i take my intro college classes in highschool with, then they should be happy because most of them dont get it themselves. I dont see the point of sitting in a class asking no questions, because that generally means everyone understands everything and if thats the case the grades dont reflect that.
 

TexanGirl

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CUNY Hunter has 800+ intro pre-med classes? :eek: Nooo way, I'll have to ask my friends to verify that. That sounds so dubious...

Back on topic: I was a lot like you before starting college and thought I would never be able to survive being in a huge lecture class. Much to my surprise, it actually wasn't too bad. If you sit in the first couple of rows, you can basically tune out and pretend the rest of the lecture hall doesn't exist. :D

While Fordham is certainly not a bad school, I don't think it provides a significant leg-up that Hunter wouldn't be able to offer, whether it be through academics, research, or prestige. Furthermore, if finances are any bit of a concern for you (30k+ tuition + 10kish for room/board, remember), then Hunter would be the smart choice.
 

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to salsa and ryserr, my thoughts agree with the information you guys are giving because, what your saying only seemed logical to me when i was thinking about these schools myself.

To gatorsbbal:

i was exaggerating about the 100 questions..and um honestly if the students are anything liek the ones i take my intro college classes in highschool with, then they should be happy because most of them dont get it themselves. I dont see the point of sitting in a class asking no questions, because that generally means everyone understands everything and if thats the case the grades dont reflect that.
College is a LOT different than high school. While it's very good to ask questions, if you ask 5+ detailed Q's in a given lecture you will make enemies fast. Also, given the faster pace of college compared to high school you need as much lecture time as possible to cover the material (depends on the subject though too).

Study the material beforehand, and if you have questions that will need quite a bit of explaining for you to understand go to your teachers office hours. In my micriobiology class we had one of these kids who asked questions every five minutes (obvious questions that can be deduced with some thinking, but also fundamental questions many students knew). Not only did we not cover all the assigned material, but I'm pretty sure that guy got some death threats.

As for the bolded part: You will most likely not be the smartest person in your lectures, and, although it depends on your university, there will be people who "get" it. Don't waste their time by asking detailed questions during lecture.

Done ranting.
(Can you guys tell I've had problems with these type of ppl? :laugh:)
 

135892

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to salsa and ryserr, my thoughts agree with the information you guys are giving because, what your saying only seemed logical to me when i was thinking about these schools myself.

To gatorsbbal:

i was exaggerating about the 100 questions..and um honestly if the students are anything liek the ones i take my intro college classes in highschool with, then they should be happy because most of them dont get it themselves. I dont see the point of sitting in a class asking no questions, because that generally means everyone understands everything and if thats the case the grades dont reflect that.
Make sure to spell my name right next time :smuggrin:

But yeah, there's nothing wrong with asking questions. Its just annoying sometimes when someone asks questions that end up slowing the whole lecture down. Of course there's always office hours, which is where you should go anyway to clear up any questions

Anyway, good luck in your decision
 
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EyEnStein 07

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hm well hunter doesn't have into pre-med courses superficially, its just bio chem and phys. and according to people i know that go there that info is true. u can check though, ill be commuting to both places.

sorry to gatorsbball.

and yes let me just clarify again. It is easier to ask questions in a smaller class size than a large class size. thats it.

thanks to everyone that helped
 

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Yes, Fordham is a small community, and you have much better chances of getting good lors, reserach, etc. NYC HS counslers high encourage students to go to CUNY schools which i donot understand. Apparently, Hunter is one of the BEST schools for Medical schools (according to a HS counsler). But I know he hasn't left his office in years, and is not up to date.

I ll say that Fordham is much much better than any of the cuny schools. ( I had choice b/w Fordham and Brooklyn College, Brooklyn College is also considered one of the best for med school. But I liked the small class size of fordham). And no the classes at Hunter are not 800 ppl, only 80-100 or probably upto 150.
But if you are paying 34,000(a grand total of 140,000 for 4 years) straight out of ur pocket, than fordham is not really worth it. You can get to know ppl at hunter too, if you make the effort. And when you go to Medschool, another 300,000. (if you go to hunter, you can save the 120,000 and pay for med school!)
Fordham is better than Hunter, but not $34,000 better.
 

Isoprop

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ISOprop and chubby chaser:

I take all AP classes right now, and i have a huge tendency to ask 100 questions, because thats just how i am. Once i get it i get it good, but if i dont i never will. A Class of 800 is most probably not the same as 25, for example w.e work is assigned is most likely to be checked over in a class of 25, where as a professor would probably not want to grade 800 papers on a regular basis. Again im just assuming + what i have heard.


Also how do i know i cant learn with 800 students...well i dont exactly because i have not, but again, i need to be able to ask the professor questions, also if i need extra help, honestly i would rather the professor help me then a professor telling me to go to the library to get help from there. The tight packed community of Fordham is something that really appealed to me.

With the LOR, um i kind of disagree. In my opinion, a professor that writes about you on a personal level meaning he knows who you are academically and non-academically, is much better than one who just talks about how in a class of 800, you were the star.

Again guys, these are just my comments, concerns and i guess frustrations. I do not go to college yet so obviously you all know so much better than I, thats why im asking so i hope none of you take what im saying the wrong way.
again, you can have a personal relationship with a professor in a big lecture hall. i've attended a lot undergrad institutions and a lot of classes, some have classes as small as 12 to ones as big as 500. i'm saying that a large class can have it's advantages as well.
 

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hm well hunter doesn't have into pre-med courses superficially, its just bio chem and phys. and according to people i know that go there that info is true. u can check though, ill be commuting to both places.

sorry to gatorsbball.

and yes let me just clarify again. It is easier to ask questions in a smaller class size than a large class size. thats it.

thanks to everyone that helped
But are small class sizes enough to justify paying 30,000 more dollars?
 

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There is a difference of over $100,000 (plus much more in interest) in what it will cost for you to go attend Fordham instead of the CUNY. How strongly would you favor Fordham if you had to take all of the loans out in your own name? Would you be willing to carry that debt yourself, along with the debt that you will incur in your own name for professional school afterwards? Even if the loans wind up being in your parents' names, it's that much less that they will have to either pass on to you later, or provide for themselves throughout their lives. As much as we'd like to ignore it, monetary considerations are very important because they affect our lives for years to come.

You can find all of the opportunities you need for research, service, and other extra curricular activities at whichever you attend. Your choices are never limited to just what is offered on-campus.

Sure, smaller classes are your favored mode for lecture. You'll get those once you get past the basic classes. The thing is, your success is going to depend on you, not the name of your school, and not the number of people in the lower level lecture halls.
 

TheRealMD

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Even my great school, The University of Texas at Austin, which boasted the highest enrollment for any college from 1997-2003, does not have 800 student classes. Perhaps you'll 1-2 intro classes that will top 500 or so (I'd say probably intro bio, chem & psych MAYBE), the majority of your undergraduate education will not have so many people in a class.

But even in a class with 500 people, it is possible to actually get to know a professor through office hours and such. I'd say one of my best LORs came from an ochem professor who taught 480 students (and did it very well in fact). However, it takes the same amount of effort for you to know a professor if you're in a class of 50 vs. 500. I think people have to remember that smaller classes doesn't force you to know a professor, it forces a professor to know you. The former is always better than the latter, regardless of class size.
 

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Once you get to medical school you quickly learn to keep your questions during lecture to a minimum. No one wants to be THAT guy...the one that turns a 50-minute lecture on B cell maturation (which is already painful enough) into a one hour + lecture. This is a good way of getting many people to dislike you very, very quickly. Scribble your question in the margin of your notes and ask once class is over. This also gets you face-time with the professor.
 

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CUNY Hunter has 800+ intro pre-med classes? :eek: Nooo way, I'll have to ask my friends to verify that. That sounds so dubious...
i was thinking the same thing. i go to a huge public university in cali and my largest has been around 300
 

ChubbyChaser

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ya totally........except not at all.

OP...... i go to a school with 1800 students. i have never been in a class w/ more than 30 students...that includes all my general bio, chem, physics crap. this semester, i had a course with only 6 people. in a course that small the individualized attentin that you get is unbelievable. and it makes a HUGE difference. its not just go to lecture, professor lectures, take test. my professor would give me the marker and tell me to go write on the board something we had talked about a week ago.

i'm the only one of my friends that went to a small school....all the other ones went to schools like berkeley, ucla, sdsu, etc.

the difference is astronomical and its something that you need to experience. i once had a professor email me to tell me she was dissapointed that i skippped class..... i almost pooed my pants. i had a professor come in to her office on Friday night at 7 PM b/c i was having trouble composing my blues composition. that does not happen at a large school, i am sorry. NO WAY. my very first college final ever was at 830 AM. i slept til 10. i ran across campus and got there as the professor was leaving. she knew who i was, she knew i was a good student, she could tell i was about to have a heart attack. she stayed and let me finish it. at a large school, i am **** out of luck, every single time.

to the other poster who tried to make the argument about being in a class with 800 students as a plus for a LOR...i can kinda see your point, but in reality thats not how it works. in a class of 800 at a good school, the chances of you being noticed are pretty slim. every week i see a thread here about troulbe finding a LOR. how people are having troulbe finding professors, they dont konw if they will remember them cuz it was a year ago...etc etc. if i needed to, i could ask for a LOR from every single professor that I took a course from. that includes freshman year first semester. i call most of the professors by their first name. i find it hard to believe that a school with 800 people per class fosters the same type of learning environment and potential to build close relationshiphs with professors as a school w/ 20 people per class. it just doesnt make any sense.

this is not a bash on large schools. if you try hard you will do fine no matter where you go. however, at a smaller school you will do things that you simply can not due at a larger school. if you wanna talk more aout the details, PM me.
Ummm I go to a school with 3000...alot of my classes are sub 20...and believe me if you ask 100 questions even a class of 3...those other two one like yuo.

THe only advantage of going to a small school is its probably easier to get up with your professors during office hours....
 

SiR99

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"i was thinking the same thing. i go to a huge public university in cali and my largest has been around 300"

Thats weird, i'm not sure what year's incoming class this was for but a couple TA's told me there were 1000-1100 students that needed to take an intro chem 14a class and they split it up into three back to back lectures with the same professor teaching it so everyone could take the class.
 
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EyEnStein 07

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Well ive heard that hunter isnt only the professor and the huge amount of students, there are a few TA's to help out
 

MilkmanAl

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I'll chime in with the choir: save your questions for office hours. Nobody likes it when someone repeatedly slows down the class. Let the professor lecture and adhere to the curriculum.
 

194342

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Teacher to class ratio is pure bs. I go to the biggest school in the nation (last time I checked it was...) and most of my pre-req classes are HUGE. Learning depends on you. I really think "personal attention" is overrated in picking an undergrad but whatev's.
 

Jolie South

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Even my great school, The University of Texas at Austin, which boasted the highest enrollment for any college from 1997-2003, does not have 800 student classes. Perhaps you'll 1-2 intro classes that will top 500 or so (I'd say probably intro bio, chem & psych MAYBE), the majority of your undergraduate education will not have so many people in a class.

But even in a class with 500 people, it is possible to actually get to know a professor through office hours and such. I'd say one of my best LORs came from an ochem professor who taught 480 students (and did it very well in fact). However, it takes the same amount of effort for you to know a professor if you're in a class of 50 vs. 500. I think people have to remember that smaller classes doesn't force you to know a professor, it forces a professor to know you. The former is always better than the latter, regardless of class size.
i went to the same school, and really it was not a big deal. there's probably less hand holding, but i think the extracurricular activities and opportunities available at a larger school will more than make up for the high student to teacher ratio. i mean there were clubs for asian underwater basketweavers (not really but imagine ridiculously out there clubs and you got it)! i doubt a 3000 person liberal arts school would have that breadth of activity.

that cost differential is significant as well. you're going to go to med school. if you're parents are having difficulty paying for your undergrad, chances are you'll be in the same situation 4 years from now. reduce your debt while you can.
 

135892

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i went to the same school, and really it was not a big deal. there's probably less hand holding, but i think the extracurricular activities and opportunities available at a larger school will more than make up for the high student to teacher ratio. i mean there were clubs for asian underwater basketweavers (not really but imagine ridiculously out there clubs and you got it)! i doubt a 3000 person liberal arts school would have that breadth of activity.

that cost differential is significant as well. you're going to go to med school. if you're parents are having difficulty paying for your undergrad, chances are you'll be in the same situation 4 years from now. reduce your debt while you can.
This is a very important thing to keep in mind... What a large school may lack in terms small class sizes definitely makes up for by having a multitude of varying opportunities to participate in whatever actually interests you. I attend a pretty large school and personally I don't regret it at all. But you have to figure out what's right for you
 

Snake Doctor

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This is a very important thing to keep in mind... What a large school may lack in terms small class sizes definitely makes up for by having a multitude of varying opportunities to participate in whatever actually interests you. I attend a pretty large school and personally I don't regret it at all. But you have to figure out what's right for you
very true. Although I personally prefer the opposite because I rather get to know my professors. Honestly though, even if you go to a large university, you can still take honors seminars as a way to challenge yourself and interact with the prof. at the same time.
The amount of resources is key, but at the same time I don't know how much resources CUNY Hunter College has over Fordham. I would think that the advising at Fordham is a lot better than CUNY Hunter College (

For small class sizes, the sitcker price is worth it, not to mention the advising that comes with it. I go to a top public, world reknown U and I was really close to sending my transf. app in due to the fact that big class sizes really isn't for me. I can't imagine sitting in a lecture with 800 other people.
Good luck with your decision!
 

paranoid_eyes

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"i was thinking the same thing. i go to a huge public university in cali and my largest has been around 300"

Thats weird, i'm not sure what year's incoming class this was for but a couple TA's told me there were 1000-1100 students that needed to take an intro chem 14a class and they split it up into three back to back lectures with the same professor teaching it so everyone could take the class.
you're right, but it's not all in the same lecture. i guess if you consider 14A to be ONE huge class (despite three different lectures) then "class" is around 800 (three lectures of about 270 enrolled students)
to have 800 in one lecture would require a mid-size auditorium.