question for dental students or dentists!

Discussion in 'Dental' started by vixen, Mar 15, 2002.

  1. vixen

    vixen I like members
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    Do they really teach you the business skills you need in dental school, or do you just kind of pick it up along the way?
     
  2. Big_Poppa DDS

    Big_Poppa DDS Senior Member
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    No they don't teach you business skills in dental school, not at Marquette anyway. When a possible future employer asked me how much I expected to make in my first year, I told him I didn't know I could only tell him what I had heard groups were giving. He was dumbfounded that we are not taught what we should ask for.
     
  3. vixen

    vixen I like members
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    hmmm, I wonder if this is a trend for all dental schools...something that I should look into. The dentist I volunteered w/said that it really could have helped out a lot. I would think that schools realize a lot of what we're doing is running a business (if we have a practice), so we should get SOME training for that.
     
  4. vixen

    vixen I like members
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    hmmm, I wonder if this is a trend for all dental schools...something that I should look into. The dentist I volunteered w/said that it really could have helped out a lot. I would think that schools realize a lot of what we're doing is running a business (if we have a practice), so we should get SOME training for that. :cool:
     
  5. JML1DDS

    JML1DDS Member
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    The amount of information needed to be crammed into 4 years of dental school is amazing. There is always talk ot adding a fifth year or requiring a one year AEGD residency for all graduating dental students simply due to the fact that the amount of information to be covered keeps growing and growing. After graduation from dental school I thought I knew a lot about dentistry, but after my first year in residency I realized they only teach you the bare essentials. We see the same thing in medicine....Four years of medical school is just enough to give you a good foundation on which to learn "real medicine". Medical doctors learn 50-60% of what they do daily from their time in residency.
    Some dental school give you practice management classes, etc. There is too much to teach and not enough time to teach it !!!!!
     
  6. lalo5

    lalo5 Member
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    hey!!
    I don't think that that part is really so much of an arduous task...considering all of the things that we('ll) learn, it really isn't that bad...
    I may be slightly biased, however, because I have had some experience in business/administration/management...
    Other option would be to have spouse/sig other be manager/accountant for the office :)
    There are plenty of accounting books available on these things, which could lend themselves to an enjoyable summer vacation :D
     
  7. vixen

    vixen I like members
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    you're right, I don't think its much of an ardous task, but I just thought that we essentially are running a business, it'd be nice to know how one runs...maybe they'll have options to take classes for business...that would be cool. I have no businness experience in my background <img border="0" title="" alt="[Eek!]" src="eek.gif" />
     
  8. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    My friend went to Temple for dental school and told me that they teach them a lot of the business aspects of dentistry.
     
  9. Yah-E

    Yah-E Toof Sniper
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    Whisker Barrel,

    In regards to Temple and business experience, current students are responsible for collecting fees from their patients and essentially running a small private practice as soon as they are exposed to patient care. I think that is the only reason that Temple dental students are familiar with some of the business aspects of dentistry. I do not believe that Temple dental incorporate any business courses in their dental curriculum though. Another perk at Temple, you are able to earn a dual degree in DMD/MBA if you're ambious enough. So I do agree with you that Temple dental does stress business and try to expose their students in business, but no courses in business is yet part of their 4 year dental curriculum!

    I too think that dental schools should teach us business and that is exactly why I plan on to seek a way and try to earn my MBA degree in Health Service Adminstration (HSA) on top of my dental education at Nova Southeastern University. Nova offer a variety of MBA degree curriculi including weekends, on-line, one-year, and the traditional two year formats. I think that it will be very intense to attempt a dual degree, but I strongly think that it will be worth my money and time down the road!

    :cool:
     
  10. Daryl wuss beast

    Daryl wuss beast Junior Member
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    I know CWRU includes practice management in their curriculum for fourth year students so their students will know a little more about the business side of things when they get out of school. This is one thing that really impressed me when I visited there.
     
  11. Dante60

    Dante60 Member
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    At Tufts, we have a practice management course that spans the entire four years. The professor brings in accountants, financial planners, lawyers and everything to helps us start our plans.

    It's a really good course and really introduces another aspect of dentistry well.
     

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