Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

question on oral surgery and MD's?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by I am here to ?, Jul 23, 2006.

  1. Can MD's still get into oral surgery via medical school if this is their interest? How does it work, do you do a general surg residency or do you compete with the DDS's in their match etc... would love for someone to explain this. I am interested in surgery in general and this is a possibility so just asking no flames please
     
  2. DoctorPardi

    DoctorPardi In Memory of Riley Jane
    Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2005
    Messages:
    3,625
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I think in some cases you have to be an MD and a dentist.
     
  3. hermit

    hermit Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I think it goes the other way - you go to dental school then do the medical school/surgery thing.
     
  4. HelenaP

    HelenaP Senior Member
    Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I think oral surgery is unique in that oral surgeons don't normally have MDs. They do dental school and then an oral surgery fellowship. Actually, maybe some of them do have MDs, but they get them some weird way in their residency after dental school.
     
  5. I have tried all my online resources here...does anyone have any final statements on this ? ---> not perhaps...?
     
  6. airflare

    airflare Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    According to my friend in dental school, oral surgery is a residency program (4-6 years) for graduates of dental school only. Some programs will also grant an MD degree.

    Bottom line: You must be a DDS/DMD to go into oral surgery.
     
  7. riceman04

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student

    No you do dental school and I also think you do medical rotations (if I am not mistaken)...It is like getting a dual degree.

    There is a program here at Penn that allows you to do that.

    Check it out
     
  8. hermit

    hermit Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Messages:
    549
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Testy...testy...
    Here, this is from wikipedia:

    The typical training program for a U.S. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon is:

    * 4 Years Undergraduate Study (BA, BS, or equivalent)
    * 4 Years Graduate Dental Study (DMD or DDS)
    * 4 - 6 Years Residency Training (6 Year training includes MD Degree)
    * Total Length after Secondary School: 12 - 14 Years
     
  9. jackieMD2007

    jackieMD2007 ***MVI***
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,510
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Nice work hermit.
    So funny how you can find things on google/wiki.... :laugh:
     
  10. Dr Durden

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    4,260
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    What about otolaryngology (ENT) and plastics? Aren't these MDs licensed to do essentially the same work?
     
  11. GoodEats

    GoodEats SDN Donor
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2005
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Yeah, after spending a summer working in the office of some oral surgeons, they said to me that I could go either DDS or MD route. I think you might have to backtrack and take a DDS course or two (?), but I'm fairly certain you can go through an MD to do oral/maxillofacial surgery. Lemme see what I can go dig up...
     
  12. GoodEats

    GoodEats SDN Donor
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2005
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Well, when the WashU pages start working for me, you could probably see through this link: residency.wustl.edu and exploring the surgery and maybe the plastics sections (using the scroll down found in the upper-right corner).
     
  13. albinomidget

    albinomidget Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    To get trained in OMFS, I believe you need to be a dentist. At some institutions, they will grant you an MD degree through their residency program. For example, at my school, when a dentist starts the residency, the first year of residency is done and the person takes one 2nd year class (we have a class that combines pharm, path, and micro into clinical cases). Then, the following year, the person does all the required 3rd year rotations. After that, the person does 4th year rotations. For most med students, 4th year rotations are mostly elective, but at my school, for the OMFS, they are required to do many months in various ICU's - SICU, MICU, Neuro-ICU, as well as anesthesia, since they often work as both surgeon and anesthesiologist. Luckily, many of those 4th year rotations count towards their residency as well as getting their MD. After getting their MD, they go straight back to residency for their completion of the OMFS specialy, with both DDS/DMD and MD degrees.

    Here is a link .

    Hope this helps.
     
  14. so just a follow up,

    according to the posts i gather that essentially you have to be a dentist, and you then go into a program that is 6 years long in which you will be given an MD and a omfs certificate

    my question is, so can't an MD right after med school just go into some OMFS program since all these programs seem to recognize that an MD is a necessary component to doing this anyway...
    I've read the link above and I understand it is completely true, but I am having it hard to believe that the only path to this is getting a DDS, then getting an MD while doing an OMFS certificate program....does this sound a lil odd ball to anyone? there must be something i am missing

    and the other thing not to start a flame is...instead of having this route where you have to get a DDS and then an MD, why not just have OMFS as a surgical sub specialty to match in for med students like optho or derm etc.
     
  15. runningmom

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    359
    Likes Received:
    0
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Depends on what you mean by "essentially the same work". I work for ENTs. They work all over the jaw, throat, in the mouth, etc. But as soon as it comes to teeth, they call in the oral surgeons.
     
  16. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    7,992
    Likes Received:
    40
    Status:
    Medical Student
    OMFS guys, except for wisdom teeth stuff pretty much do a lot of the same stuff as plastics or ent guys can do. They have their 4 years dental and then apply to either a 4 year residency or a 6 year. Completion of 4 year gets you a certificate and 6 year is pretty much the same but they do the first two years of medical school on top of it and then you wind up with an MD as well. I have heard there is actually fairly little difference between the two...except one looks nicer. It is fairly competitive to get into from dental school...not as bad as orthodontics I believe..but up there. The closest thing for medical school is ENT though. The main difference is that the omfs guys can just do extractions all day..the ent might but I am sure they have a different bread and butter. Make your you like general dentistry if you try to do it through a dental route since that is what you will be most likley doing if you don't get accepted to a program. There is tons of information on it..I recommend digging through the dental threads on here to get al ittle guidance.
     
  17. medgator

    medgator Senior Member
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    3,490
    Likes Received:
    449
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Pretty much anything outside of general peds, general IM, FP is going to be at least 4 years and will generally be 5-6 yrs (IM + fellowship, gen surg, rads/rad onc, peds + fellowship, ENT, and Uro). In that regard, its really not that much worse.... ENT and OMFS probably only differ by about 1 year of overall training.
     
  18. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    7,992
    Likes Received:
    40
    Status:
    Medical Student
    It's not as bad as it seems.....6 years...I mean you are getting that MD in 2 years essentially and the rest is 4 years. It is not uncommon at all to hit 6 in a lot of stuff....especially when throwing a fellowship in. My dad took 6 years with including fellowships for radiology. While you aren't in the money you are still making enough to live off of.....so it isn't quite the same as all the years of regular school where you just feel like you are spending money without any true income.
     

Share This Page