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463951

I have done a search on this forum, but I can not find answers to some very specific questions I have.

I am beginning a post doc in state A, but once I am done, I am about 75% sure that I will be relocating to state B, with a 25% chance that I will end up relocating to state C.

1) Can I sit for the EPPP in the state I am currently in, even if I have no intention of staying once I finish post-doc?

2) A supervisor at my internship site mentioned something about applying for licensure PRIOR to beginning post-doc. Has anybody heard of this? What if we don't know for sure which state we will end up in?

3) I have heard about "banking" hours for post-doc. How do I do this? Do I start now?

4) I have been googling licensure requirements for various states, and have noticed that there are quite a few sites with this information. Is there any website in particular that you would recommend for this?

Thank you all in advance.
 

WisNeuro

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I got licensed during my 2nd year of a neuro postdoc. Also in a state in which I had no intention of staying once I was finished. Although I stayed in the VA, so it didn't matter where I was licensed. As for applying before postdoc, really depends on the state and where you plan on being licensed at ultimately. Some states want the hours accrued postdoc and do not account pre doc hours.
 
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Shooter

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I have done a search on this forum, but I can not find answers to some very specific questions I have.

I am beginning a post doc in state A, but once I am done, I am about 75% sure that I will be relocating to state B, with a 25% chance that I will end up relocating to state C.

1) Can I sit for the EPPP in the state I am currently in, even if I have no intention of staying once I finish post-doc?

2) A supervisor at my internship site mentioned something about applying for licensure PRIOR to beginning post-doc. Has anybody heard of this? What if we don't know for sure which state we will end up in?

3) I have heard about "banking" hours for post-doc. How do I do this? Do I start now?

4) I have been googling licensure requirements for various states, and have noticed that there are quite a few sites with this information. Is there any website in particular that you would recommend for this?

Thank you all in advance.
Comes own to the specifics states you ar looking at

1- Yes, you can. It is even possible to take the EPPP before completing the doctorate degree. The catch: Will have to be about $80 'transfer' the score to state B and/or C.

2-Yes, also possible...but depends on specific state rules (some won't allow it). If you don't know for sure, you risk wasting time and money ($400+) on applications and fees.

3- Credentials Banking is super convenient and you can start as early as a grad student

4- Google the specific state's psychology board. Ken Pope has most states' licensing boards in one webpage for your convenience...some links are dead.
 
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AcronymAllergy

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The ASPPB also has licensure information for all states (Psychologists -> Licensure Info -> Specific Licensure Reqs.).

As for sitting the EPPP prior to doctoral degree completion, I believe that may depend on the specific state; some may allow you to sit, while others may not. Always best to check with the board of the state in which you're wanting to be licensed.

Another thing to keep in mind--you can definitely apply for licensure in your current state even if you don't end up there, and in some ways this can provide an advantage (e.g., by showing potential employers that you're licensed and will likely be eligible in their state as well); however, licensure fees are generally non-refundable. Thus, you might shell out a few hundred dollars for a few months' worth of licensing. Not the end of the world, but something else to consider.
 
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OP
4

463951

Comes own to the specifics states you ar looking at

1- Yes, you can. It is even possible to take the EPPP before completing the doctorate degree. The catch: Will have to be about $80 'transfer' the score to state B and/or C.

2-Yes, also possible...but depends on specific state rules (some won't allow it). If you don't know for sure, you risk wasting time and money ($400+) on applications and fees.

3- Credentials Banking is super convenient and you can start as early as a grad student

4- Google the specific state's psychology board. Ken Pope has most states' licensing boards in one webpage for your convenience...some links are dead.
Thanks! :) These are very helpful links.
 
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OP
4

463951

The ASPPB also has licensure information for all states (Psychologists -> Licensure Info -> Specific Licensure Reqs.).

As for sitting the EPPP prior to doctoral degree completion, I believe that may depend on the specific state; some may allow you to sit, while others may not. Always best to check with the board of the state in which you're wanting to be licensed.

Another thing to keep in mind--you can definitely apply for licensure in your current state even if you don't end up there, and in some ways this can provide an advantage (e.g., by showing potential employers that you're licensed and will likely be eligible in their state as well); however, licensure fees are generally non-refundable. Thus, you might shell out a few hundred dollars for a few months' worth of licensing. Not the end of the world, but something else to consider.
Thank you for providing the info on ASPPB, that's exactly what I was looking for.

Sorry, my original post was a little confusing. I have already acquired my doctoral degree. My degree was conferred last month. At what point do I submit forms for licensure? At the beginning of my post-doc year, or when I apply to take the EPPP? Let's say I did know for sure which state I was going to end up in...would I begin the application process now? Thanks!
 

AcronymAllergy

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Thank you for providing the info on ASPPB, that's exactly what I was looking for.

Sorry, my original post was a little confusing. I have already acquired my doctoral degree. My degree was conferred last month. At what point do I submit forms for licensure? At the beginning of my post-doc year, or when I apply to take the EPPP? Let's say I did know for sure which state I was going to end up in...would I begin the application process now? Thanks!
It'll depend on the state. Where I applied, they would accept forms at any point, but required submission of supervisory attestation forms for the postdoc year and would also only keep your application "active" for 1 calendar year. Thus, if I'd applied at the very beginning of my postdoc, but had run into a delay in getting the supervisory attestation forms filled out and sent after 12 months (or had not passed the EPPP), I may have needed to re-submit the initial application materials is >1 year had passed.

If it's a state that doesn't require the postdoc year, then you can probably begin applying now or in the very near future. If it's a state that does require the postdoc year, you'll likely have some time, but I would suggest going to the state board's website and reviewing the specific process there.
 
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Bayside

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I'm currently working towards licensure in the 4th state in which I've lived. The 1st state required all post doc hours completed before the EPPP could be taken. Licensure in the second state required transfer of EPPP score plus an oral exam ( but had no post doc supervised hours requirement). Third required EPPP score transfer, ethics and jurisprudence exam plus oral (given membership in the national Register). Latest requires EPPP transfer, ethics and jurisprudence exam in addition to masses of paperwork including original transcripts, letters of rec from director of training etc. etc. (despite membership in Nat Register) because it has no reciprocity with other states. All states required certification of good standing in all other states in which I'd ever held a license. Every part of the application process has fees associated with it. My experience has been that licensure requirements are far from standardized and it's worthwhile to be aware in advance of the requirements in the most restrictive state in which you plan to practice. Highly recommend credential banking of some sort - without Nat Register the last 2 license applications would have been even worse.