Jun 26, 2009
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Pre-Psychology
I have recently become interested in MSW programs as a means of reaching my end goal of working as a therapist either in private practice or in a group. I am interested in going to school in California, as it is where I will eventually live and practice.

I've seen people recommend CSU Long Beach, would this be a good choice? I'm interested in integrative therapy approaches as well as working with a wide and diverse population. If I had to pick a track, I'd more inclined towards youth and adolescents as well as couples/family therapy. I'd also like to work in an eating disorders clinic.

Also, what about Pepperdine's MFT program? Is this different from their MA in psych? That's all I see on their website so I'm a little confused...

What are the advantages of getting a MSW over a MFT?

Are these programs easier to get into compared to a Psy.D? It seems like a lot of the GPA standards I've seen so far have been much lower. What do they look for in the admissions process? Is there still an interview?

And finally, how good is the financial aid for these programs? What would be my best (and cheapest) option for a program in CA that would have a mental health focus?

Thank you!
 
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Therapist4Chnge

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Most any doctoral program will be harder to get into than an MA/MS, though getting into a good MA/MS is far from a cake walk. I think the Pepperdine program has been mentioned on here before, so a search may turn something up.

As for MSW v. MFT....I do know that the MSW has been around longer and seems to be more prevalent. Depending on the SW program, you'll get a different split of administrative v. applied training. Some SW programs are much more about case management and the "social" side, while others are much more about the therapy side. I think in regard to flexibility a SW degree would be preferred, though I happen to really like the MFT approach to things (many seem to lean towards a Systems / Family System approach).
 

Therapist4Chnge

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As an aside, I'm glad to see more activity in here, particularly the recent inquires about MFT programs. I don't know as much about them, though I like what I've seen thus far in regard to the curriculum.
 
OP
S
Jun 26, 2009
39
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Status
Pre-Psychology
Thank you.

Also, would I still be able to work with individuals if I got my MFT? Or is it solely families?
 

Therapist4Chnge

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It is a common misnomer that you'd be restricted to family and marriage counseling, though you should be trained to do individual work too. Most programs seem to work from a systems approach, which requires an understanding of individual dynamics, as well as group/family/other dynamics.
 
OP
S
Jun 26, 2009
39
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Status
Pre-Psychology
Great, thank you Therapist4Chnge.

I also just started looking into Antioch in Santa Barbara's MACP program. Does anyone have any opinions about/experiences with this school?

Thanks!
 

psychgirl05

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Dec 12, 2008
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hi all!

a few questions:

1. can a lcsw do work in a private practice? i know hundreds of mft's who do one on one therapy in a private practice, but can lcsw's do the same? this might be incorrect, but it seems like mft are more private practice oriented?

2. what would be an example of clinical experience/supervision an msw would do while collecting hours for licensure? and how does this differ from the clinical experience an mft would do?

thanks!
 

psychgirl05

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Dec 12, 2008
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also, what would be some valuable social work related experience to have before applying?? i'm currently volunteering at a substance abuse program at a university...would this constitute social work experience? (i guess i'm just confused as to the difference of "social work" vs "psychology" work experience.)

thank you!
 

Krisss17

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Feb 3, 2007
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hi all!

a few questions:

1. can a lcsw do work in a private practice? i know hundreds of mft's who do one on one therapy in a private practice, but can lcsw's do the same? this might be incorrect, but it seems like mft are more private practice oriented?

2. what would be an example of clinical experience/supervision an msw would do while collecting hours for licensure? and how does this differ from the clinical experience an mft would do?

thanks!

As to your first question, yes. Actually in order to be in private practice you need to have your MSW and get your LCSW (i.e. license to practice).

Since I am only a BSW student-to-be, I can't really give any steadfast advise on your second class. The advantage of the MSW is you are not locked into any one area. You can do private practice or not. There are just so many avenues and needs.

Good luck in your choice!:luck::luck::luck::luck: