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Quick question about PC sports med...

Discussion in 'Family Medicine' started by Biscuit799, May 7, 2007.

  1. Biscuit799

    Biscuit799 7+ Year Member

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    The vast majority of SM fellowships are FP. However I know they accept EM and IM grads. While there are EM and IM sports med programs, there are only one and two programs, respectively.

    So my question is, does anybody have any idea how hard it is to get one of these FP spots as a non-FP? I've never heard this issue addressed before, and I'm having a really hard time finding info out about it.
     
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  3. njbmd

    njbmd Guest Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

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    Moving to Family Medicine as medical students are not in the fellowship market and because most Sports Medicine programs are administered by Family Medicine Departments.
     
  4. sophiejane

    sophiejane Exhausted Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    I'm just curious about what kind of sports medicine practice you'd plan to have with IM or EM training? Are you just hoping to get some extra training, or do you want to make it your primary practice? Pretty much impossible to do with EM, I would think, and kind of odd for IM, who tend to see many older people with multiple chronic illnesses who aren't exactly athletes.

    My impression of sports medicine was that of treating a large number of younger people (someone correct me if I'm wrong) with sports-related injuries. Just wondering why you wouldn't just do FM if you are really interested in sports medicine.
     
  5. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Fides et ratio. Physician Gold Donor SDN Advisor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    I suspect it will be harder to get in as a non-FP, but not impossible. I don't think it's possible to quantify exactly how difficult. The fellowship application process is much less structured than the Match.
     
  6. Static Line

    Static Line America's Guard of Honor 5+ Year Member

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    From my little narrow experience you're right, at least with my school. The sports docs for our school say that FM, EM, PM&R are eligible to apply but they run the show and are all FM and nobody outside of FM has ever made it in.
     
  7. Biscuit799

    Biscuit799 7+ Year Member

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    From my very narrow experience, I would imagine that as an IM or EM physician, you'd be as prepared to deal with a smaller subset of patients (i.e. college or professional-age) athletes, and less well prepared for the younger athletes. That being said, I really have no idea, and I'd imagine that for an EP or IM, it'd be more of an addendum to the practice.

    My question stems from a lack of focus as to an intended specialty. I feel like it would be a mistake to go into FP solely to do sports med, as most of the sports med docs at my school do primarily FP. Thus it was more a question of options than anything else.
     
  8. sophiejane

    sophiejane Exhausted Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    I can sort of see it with IM, but EM--you have your shift, and you have random patients who come in. Would you just want to be the person they send all the sports-related injuries to? Typically, docs in the ED pick up patients in the order they come in. If one person has a complicated patient, others step in and grab new ones to help them out, etc. It's not really a situation where you can choose your patients, or they can choose you. I would imagine you'd get a few sports-related injuries now and then, but it's not going to be something you will really get the benefit of doing a full extra year of (on top of a 4 year residency).

    As for IM, it basically cuts you out of seeing kids <18 with sports related injuries, and I would imagine that cuts out quite a bit.

    I just think you should consider how much you are going to get to do sports medicine in those two fields. Consider whether those few patients a month are really worth all that extra time in a fellowship. I wouldn't do it, personally.

    I know you are probably uncertain at this point, and we have all been there. But if you want to do primarily sports medicine, FM is the quickest route to the greatest number of patients. It sounds to me like you don't want to be "stuck" seeing mostly FM, when you really want a sports medicine practice. I understand your hesitation, when you see docs who do more FM than SM, but you dohave some control of your practice, where you practice, your patient base, etc.

    Just something to think about before you cut FM out of the picture, and put yourself in a position where you are less likely to get the fellowship and the practice you really want.
     
  9. beachbum

    beachbum Member 7+ Year Member

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    does any know the salary range for a sports medicine doc? does salary get better (or higher) with a private practice in sports medicine? thanks in advance for the info.

    beachbum
     
  10. iatrosB

    iatrosB trying not to kill anyone 5+ Year Member

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  11. beachbum

    beachbum Member 7+ Year Member

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    Thanks Iatros... does anyone knows a sports doc making more than 300K+. what type of lifestyle does he have? lost of calls? works 6 days a week?
     
  12. Static Line

    Static Line America's Guard of Honor 5+ Year Member

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    FM with 1-2 years w/o OB = 161k
    FM with > 3 years w/o OB = 135k :confused:
    why is salary going in reverse on that list. I don't like lists like that anyhow. To generalized. FM Income is directly proportional to amount of work you put in.

    I know sports docs who do nothing but SM in private clinic who make bank. They get referals from all over from people who aren't as comfortable with musculoskeletal injuries. It has taken a while to est that rep so they had to pay their dues.

    I know SM docs who work for div 1 university and they handle all athletes from every sport on campus and that includes all the PC issues off season as well. That's all they do but these jobs are rare and you better be connected somewhere somehow. Their weekends are usually shot.

    It's tacky to talk salary so I don't ask because I consider that a "nonya" conversation. But they do drive nice cars and one has a little dunlap so they're not hungry.

    Beachbum: as far as the weekends go. If you do SM and want to be successful you will have to sacrifice many of your weekends. That's when most all games take place. If you do SM in private practice then you will have to be at the beck and call of the teams you want to support or they will find someone who will be available. My friends in private practice have given the team trainer and team members his cell # and it rings frequently on the weekends. But he is happy.
     
  13. iatrosB

    iatrosB trying not to kill anyone 5+ Year Member

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    It has been speculated that the initial salary includes things like "garanteed salary" from a hospital that then dissappears after one-three years. After the initial period, some physicians don't generate enough revenue to maintain that inflated salary (and of course some perform even better than the original). You're right though, lists like this are VERY generalized, but it is nice to have a ballpark when you are thinking about med school/specialties/careers etc.
     
  14. Biscuit799

    Biscuit799 7+ Year Member

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    Thanks for the info, makes sense about the FP programs leaning towards FP docs. Just to clarify, it's not that I want to rule FP out. Quite the contrary, I don't want to rule anything else out yet. My mind is still wide open.

    As far as salaries, I've heard sports med docs get paid less than the average FP, but have a higher job satisfaction!
     
  15. beachbum

    beachbum Member 7+ Year Member

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    "As far as salaries, I've heard sports med docs get paid less than the average FP, but have a higher job satisfaction!" biscuit799

    SAY WHAT!!! how can that be?
     
  16. Biscuit799

    Biscuit799 7+ Year Member

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    I have no idea, and I heard it from a clinical professor of mine who is an FP sports med doc.
     
  17. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Fides et ratio. Physician Gold Donor SDN Advisor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    The sports med guys I work with earn slightly more than the average FP in my group, but I don't think they're any more or less satisfied than the rest of us. We're all doing pretty much what we want to do. They work with a group of orthopods and do exclusively sports medicine.
     

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