Shredder

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Has anyone ever quit a position as officer of a club, and why? Were there any repercussions, and do you regret it at all? I'm thinking about it; this club I'm in is stagnant and lackluster in recent years, and there are too many opposing forces to try to change that. I refuse to carry on solely for resume padding and whatnot, it's just not worth the wasted time or effort, and it's not right to continue for that reason. I had been banking on a letter of rec from the sponsor, but I may say goodbye to that.

Do adcoms even care about all the bogus clubs and positions most people cite? How can you really know how much people make up? +few of those positions confer any real leadership experience at all. I hope they see through it all to the real person. That short interview must matter a lot. Well, good, I just hope the interviewers have brains.
 

funshine

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Shredder said:
Has anyone ever quit a position as officer of a club, and why? Were there any repercussions, and do you regret it at all? I'm thinking about it; this club I'm in is stagnant and lackluster in recent years, and there are too many opposing forces to try to change that. I refuse to carry on solely for resume padding and whatnot, it's just not worth the wasted time or effort, and it's not right to continue for that reason. I had been banking on a letter of rec from the sponsor, but I may say goodbye to that.

Do adcoms even care about all the bogus clubs and positions most people cite? How can you really know how much people make up? +few of those positions confer any real leadership experience at all. I hope they see through it all to the real person. That short interview must matter a lot. Well, good, I just hope the interviewers have brains.
I was co-president of a club during freshman and soph years, and ended up quitting because senior members (i.e. former presidents/officers) were pressuring us to keep the club a certain way, and I disagreed. Also, yeah, there was a lot of tension between certain members--lots of cliques within, and I just couldn't stand it anymore.

I quit because it got to be a waste of time. I dreaded going to meetings, I despised certain members, and it just became a huge burden.

The club was run exclusively by students, so I wouldn't have gotten a LOR from that anyway. But you can still talk about it in your PS or other essays. There are plenty of ways to show your involvement in your app.

In my interview, I'm going to describe my situation so that it makes myself look good, but in reality, I think it would've showed more character had I stuck w/ the club and tried to change it for the better. But there's no reason interviewers need to know the nitty-gritty on that. :)
 

8744

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Just say whatever you want to about the club, even if it is for resume padding. Nobody cares and everybody knows that most medical school applicants do all kinds of things for the sole purpose of making themselves look "engaged" or compassionate.

Play the game. Too bad you can't get a letter but then unless the sponsor of the club was the head of Neurosurgery the letter is probably meaningless anyways. One meaningless letter is as good as another.

You are overthinking it. five years from now when you are graduating from medical school you will look back at all the hoops you made yourself jump through and laugh, especially at the notion that any college level activity requires any leadership ability.

My big pet peeve with medical school admission was the requirement that we prove we "care." I don't "care" any more or less than most people and I have done just fine.
 

Phil Anthropist

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I served one year as a Co-President of a student organization. The following year I served as Vice President of that same organization. I resigned at the end of the Fall term because I wouldn't be able to make the meetings in the Spring term (obligation from 6-9pm during the week). I knew this the summer before the academic year started. I also informed my E-board members that summer and they were cool with it. I knew that there was a possibility that I'd have this particular obligation in the Spring, so that was one reason I ran for the VP spot instead of President that year. It wasn't like I just picked up and left, so I feel no regret or repercussions. Had I not served as the Co-Prez the year before, I'd probably feel differently about giving up the position. The organization was fortunate enough to have some devoted members, so there weren't any major problems when I departed. However, that organization was really important to me and I would have loved to stay (it wasn't lackluster), but it just wasn't possible to serve my role in the Spring.
 
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Shredder

Shredder

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Panda Bear said:
Just say whatever you want to about the club, even if it is for resume padding. Nobody cares and everybody knows that most medical school applicants do all kinds of things for the sole purpose of making themselves look "engaged" or compassionate.

Play the game. Too bad you can't get a letter but then unless the sponsor of the club was the head of Neurosurgery the letter is probably meaningless anyways. One meaningless letter is as good as another.

You are overthinking it. five years from now when you are graduating from medical school you will look back at all the hoops you made yourself jump through and laugh, especially at the notion that any college level activity requires any leadership ability. :laugh:

My big pet peeve with medical school admission was the requirement that we prove we "care." I don't "care" any more or less than most people and I have done just fine.
If only all posts were this real. Thanks you other guys for your thoughts as well. Coolest conservative :thumbup: