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guirmg

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Hello guys! I'm from Brazil and I have passed in Radiation Oncology AND Nuclear Medicine in Brazil.

Now I have terrible doubts about what to do.

Here in Brazil, Nuclear Medicine's market is getting harder to enter. I think I would be happier as a Nuclear Physician but I'm worried about the future.

What can u say me about nuclear medicine's market in USA?? What about Radiation Oncology?? I have noticed that med market in Brazil follows some tendencies from USA's market.

Thanks for your help!!

Guilherme
 

colbgw02

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Try the separate board for Radiation Oncology.

My particular opinion is that without also being a radiologist, nuclear medicine is a tough field. PET/CT is hot right now, and we're finding new and better ways to combine nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology modalities. The problem is, of course, that you're of little value to the average radiology practice if you can't interpret the CT or MR portion of the study. That really limits job opportunities.

Are you asking to get a general idea of these specialties worldwide? Or is it because you're looking to practice in the U.S.? Assuming that you enjoy the material equally, I would strongly consider going the rad onc route because the lifestyle and compensation are tough to beat.
 

guirmg

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Hello! Tranks for the answer!
I want to stay here in Brazil. Maybe, I would like to do a PhD in US.

2 problems with Nuc Med in Brazil:
1) PET/CT isn't a reality for 90% of the population.
2) If you did a residency in radiology in Brazil and you want to try Nuclear Medicine, you will have to do another residency with 3 years lenght after finishing Radiology...
 
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IndyXRT

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Hello! Tranks for the answer!
I want to stay here in Brazil. Maybe, I would like to do a PhD in US.

2 problems with Nuc Med in Brazil:
1) PET/CT isn't a reality for 90% of the population.
2) If you did a residency in radiology in Brazil and you want to try Nuclear Medicine, you will have to do another residency with 3 years lenght after finishing Radiology...
Personally, I think that radiation oncology is much more interesting than nuclear medicine. But then, as a radiation oncologist, I am somewhat biased. As noted above, a stand-alone nuclear medicine residency isn't too useful in the U.S., whereas radiation oncologists have no difficulty finding jobs.
 

guirmg

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Isn't there anyone recommending Nuclear Medicine??? :eek:
 

Winged Scapula

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Isn't there anyone recommending Nuclear Medicine??? :eek:
No.

Nuclear Medicine in the US is typically seen as a dead-end job, with the residencies often filled by FMGs who could not get into any other type of US training. It is extremely non-competitive.

As noted above, in the US, training only in Nuclear Medicine, SEVERELY limits your employment opportunities. Most hospitals and radiology groups will not hire someone who can only read Nuc Med exams and administer Nuc Meds. Employers want someone who has done a full radiology residency.

In regards to Radiation Oncology, this is a totally separate field from Nuc Med in the US and you generally do not find people trained in both. Rad Onc is a very competitive specialty in the US, attracting the best and the brightest (I believe the number of PhD holders is amongst the highest in this field). Lots of employment opportunities although I cannot say what it would be for someone educated outside of the US.

Since you are using this info simply to gauge the tenor of the fields in the US, suffice it to say that while the field of medicine is working toward more and more superspecialization, only being trained in Nuc Medicine is not a valid career for most people in the US. You need to be fully qualified as a radiologist.

Radiation Oncology will continue to be a popular and worthwhile pursuit for the time being.
 

guirmg

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It seems to me that Nuc Med and Rad Onc are residencies "undiscovered" in Brazil.


Physicians hadn’t any problems finding jobs in these specialties here, but, loking for US market, maybe Nuclear Medicine is one "easy saturable" field and has the competition of radiologists, cardiologists, endocrinologists...

Thus, I think Rad Onc will be a safier route. As I don't want to gamble with my life and I enjoy both fields, I'll take your considerations and try Rad Onc.

If anyone disagree, or agree, please post a commentary.
 

Winged Scapula

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It seems to me that Nuc Med and Rad Onc are residencies "undiscovered" in Brazil.


Physicians hadn’t any problems finding jobs in these specialties here, but, loking for US market, maybe Nuclear Medicine is one "easy saturable" field and has the competition of radiologists, cardiologists, endocrinologists...

Thus, I think Rad Onc will be a safier route. As I don't want to gamble with my life and I enjoy both fields, I'll take your considerations and try Rad Onc.

If anyone disagree, or agree, please post a commentary.
Unfortunately, being a US based site, we have a dearth of information in regards to the employment opportunities in Brazil.

It is not clear to me what your plans are. In earlier posts, you state that you were just interested in what the fields are like in the US and state that you want to stay in Brazil. Therefore, even if you feel that practice mirrors that of the US, it would behoove you to speak to practitioners of both fields in your country and see what the projections are before making any decisions with lifelong consequences.
 

IndyXRT

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Unfortunately, being a US based site, we have a dearth of information in regards to the employment opportunities in Brazil.

It is not clear to me what your plans are. In earlier posts, you state that you were just interested in what the fields are like in the US and state that you want to stay in Brazil. Therefore, even if you feel that practice mirrors that of the US, it would behoove you to speak to practitioners of both fields in your country and see what the projections are before making any decisions with lifelong consequences.
Agreed. My comments apply only to the U.S.

Also, to the OP, you still seem to be confused on one point: in the US, there are two ways to become trained in Nuclear Medicine. You can do a residency solely in Nuclear Medicine, which only qualifies you to read NM exams and administer radiopharmaceuticals. Alternatively, you can do a radiology residency with additional training in nuclear medicine. This route is by far the most popular and most competitive, as it makes you much more flexible (you can read CT, MRI, ultrasound, NM exams, and administer radiopharmaceuticals). I have no idea how things work in Brazil, so this may or may not apply to your situation.
 

guirmg

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Agreed. My comments apply only to the U.S.

Also, to the OP, you still seem to be confused on one point: in the US, there are two ways to become trained in Nuclear Medicine. You can do a residency solely in Nuclear Medicine, which only qualifies you to read NM exams and administer radiopharmaceuticals. Alternatively, you can do a radiology residency with additional training in nuclear medicine. This route is by far the most popular and most competitive, as it makes you much more flexible (you can read CT, MRI, ultrasound, NM exams, and administer radiopharmaceuticals). I have no idea how things work in Brazil, so this may or may not apply to your situation.
Thanks, guys. I understood your statements.

As I said before, I want to stay here in Brazil.

I'm using this forum because NM is a relatively new field here, so, it's hard to make some projections.

Obviously, I'm talking with Nuclear Physicians and Rad Oncologists here in Brazil and this forum is working as one extra source of good information.

But, as I think Brazil's market has A LOT OF things very simmiliar to US's market, I'm worried about Nuc physicians in some years have serious difficulties to find jobs in Brazil, like happens in US.

Was I clear? Any other advices?
 
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