Ray of hope from healthcare reform bill passing? (and a whole buncha darkness)

Aug 19, 2009
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If Congress passes the health care reform bill this weekend, possibly through the use of various tricks to jump the Republican blockade, one good thing might come out of it. If the bill passes and comes into effect some time in 2010, then the current shortage of primary care providers will become evident VERY quickly. Nothing like 20 million people who suddenly have insurance coverage flooding the system. Evidently, there's also a shortage of surgeons as well...presumably some of these uninsured have been putting off needed surgery for years since they don't have immediately life threating illnesses.

Heck, there's probably a numerical shortage of dermatologists. (or they wouldn't be able to bank money hand over fist for 40 hours of office work per week)

Anyways, the bottleneck is in the number of residency spots. Until that limit is lifted, these shortages will get worse and worse. The increases in medical school enrollment have done absolutely nothing for the shortage. Maybe this time the legislation to fix the problem will get out of committee.

What's a few billion more to train doctors every year when the country's a trillion in the red?
 

Bobblehead

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It's cheaper to simply make the existing doctors work harder. After all, doctors make plenty of money and if they just saw more people per day the system will work just fine.

Nothing to see here folks, move along, move along.
 
Mar 16, 2010
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It's cheaper to simply make the existing doctors work harder. After all, doctors make plenty of money and if they just saw more people per day the system will work just fine.

Nothing to see here folks, move along, move along.
Yes, let's just make more time in the day and supply them with some espresso... Most doctors now work as much as they *want* to, because they make so much that they don't really *have* to work any more than that. They certainly don't hold themselves accountable to every patient that tries to get an appointment with them. Paying them less may boost them a bit, or send them all into an early retirement.

I agree that more residencies would be convenient but my apologies, no idea how to accomplish that.
 
Jan 29, 2010
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The bill does open up more residency spots--but, they're not specifically for primary care. The most likely result is that the top applicants for residency will flock to the specialties and everyone else will be left with primary care.
 

physicsnerd42

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I found this pretty interesting (analysis of the house bill):

Sec. 1202. Payments to primary care physicians: Requires that Medicaid payment rates to primary care physicians for furnishing primary care services be no less than 100% of Medicare payment rates in 2013 and 2014 (the first year of the Senate bill's Medicaid coverage expansion to all individuals with incomes under 133% of poverty). Provides 100% federal funding for the incremental costs to States of meeting this requirement.
 

ncguy2005

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Yes, let's just make more time in the day and supply them with some espresso... Most doctors now work as much as they *want* to, because they make so much that they don't really *have* to work any more than that. They certainly don't hold themselves accountable to every patient that tries to get an appointment with them. Paying them less may boost them a bit, or send them all into an early retirement.

I agree that more residencies would be convenient but my apologies, no idea how to accomplish that.
Ummm... I'm not trying to be rude, but your status is pre-med. How could you know doctors treat patients this way? I don't know if you're serious, but if I'm reading this correctly, and if I was a primary care doctor, I'd probably be a little offended.
 

Blue Dog

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Ummm... I'm not trying to be rude, but your status is pre-med. How could you know doctors treat patients this way? I don't know if you're serious, but if I'm reading this correctly, and if I was a primary care doctor, I'd probably be a little offended.
I assumed he was being sarcastic.

Either that, or he's incredibly out of touch.
 

turquoiseblue

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i don't see why they don't try and make more spots in residency...i know most of the existing doctors want the high salary by working harder and want it as sky high as it can get---that is probably the reason they don't change a thing.

that must be why the bill to make thousands of more residency spots in the US was turned down...

in the least, i wish the gov would let people be allowed to switch residencies like they used to, instead of the whole cap funding written by Bill Clinton....it's unfair to those that had some mishap happen to them in residency who have to suffer the fact that person may never get to be a doctor...that means getting an MD is not anything stable. you can lose it and not many seem to care that you worked so hard to get where you are..it's absolute unfairness, they can't even win with a lawyer....all odds are against them...that person went through medical school i mean why shouldn't they deserve to be a doctor if they passed everything. i hate the fact about 'red flags' these days. I bet it was never an issue back in the day and the doctors were still as good as ever in the end. doctors could even do jobs like PA's....now the MD is such a horrible thing to achieve. the doctors without residency can't even get a regular job worth anything at all...too overqualified...when did that become something that is acceptable? im surprised that a place advanced as the USA hasn't already solved this problem...eg. make a system where an MD can have a decent job at least. i mean an MD is a big deal to achieve......and so is the USMLE...why does it count for nothing!!??

Additionally, with more doctors out there, the waiting time to get a doctor would be less. Sometimes the wait is a few months for a very urgent problem. That's pretty dangerous for the patients. Not to mention, sometimes the docs that grad residency want to take their education to another country so not all the spots go toward a job as a physician in the US.
 
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Coastie

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lol, dude..

that's not the way to see it.

BTW, ever heard of nurse practitioners, aka, Nocters?

That's the future under Chairman MaobamaCare, not more physicians.

If Congress passes the health care reform bill this weekend, possibly through the use of various tricks to jump the Republican blockade, one good thing might come out of it. If the bill passes and comes into effect some time in 2010, then the current shortage of primary care providers will become evident VERY quickly. Nothing like 20 million people who suddenly have insurance coverage flooding the system. Evidently, there's also a shortage of surgeons as well...presumably some of these uninsured have been putting off needed surgery for years since they don't have immediately life threating illnesses.

Heck, there's probably a numerical shortage of dermatologists. (or they wouldn't be able to bank money hand over fist for 40 hours of office work per week)

Anyways, the bottleneck is in the number of residency spots. Until that limit is lifted, these shortages will get worse and worse. The increases in medical school enrollment have done absolutely nothing for the shortage. Maybe this time the legislation to fix the problem will get out of committee.

What's a few billion more to train doctors every year when the country's a trillion in the red?