Mar 21, 2010
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Hey~
i'm pretty sure there is a thread about this somewhere, but I can't seem to find it. I'm planning to take re-takes this summer and fall. Does it really matter much if it is at community college vs. a 4-year institution? I know some PT schools strictly prohibit classes taken at a community college, but for those that do accept, do they take into account the type of institution you took the re-takes, pre-reqs at? I would take the re-takes and the pre-reqs at my school, but I'm about to graduate. I also go to the most expensive school in the US and tuition is a killer!! Any help and insight gladly appreciated!!
 
Jan 11, 2010
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Detroit, Michigan
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
It really depends on the institution, but I would recommend it personally. I took all my prerequisites at a community college and made sure I got all A's. Just think of the amount of hours you would have to work to make up the difference in cost, then apply that extra time into getting straight A's.

I was asked about my community college experience during my interview. I told them that they were some of the most difficult courses I had taken, but I just applied myself more (which was true, there is no easy Chem I, II). I was lucky cause my interviewer took courses at a community college and he agreed with me.
 
May 15, 2009
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Rehab Sci Student
Edit: Posted a couple minutes late, broet pretty much covered it.

It seems that the majority of schools with generally accept pre-reqs taken at a community college. It might "appear" better to take them at a 4-year institution, but if you can get all A's at the community college, there's not much better than that. Call the schools that you might be interested in applying to, ask their admissions board if they have any restriction or preference. That's the only way to be 100% sure.
 
Feb 27, 2010
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Rehab Sci Student
as long as the community college is an accredited institution, it should be okay.

ALL the schools i applied to, they accepted classes from a community college. i did the same thing, after i graduated from undergrad, i re-took some courses and took courses i never took in undergrad.

best advice is, to make sure you work hard to get A's and B's for the community college courses.
 
Mar 21, 2010
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Yeah. I think I'm just going to take the pre-reqs at a community college near my house and not apply to the PT schools that don't accept community college credits. I get the NJ state discount and a county discount as well. Tuition is $111 per credit!! AMAZING!!
 

MuscleHead

10+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2009
207
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Ambler, PA
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
yeah, community college is definitely the way to go. so much more affordable and more convenient. just make sure to tear it up.
 

lee9786

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2009
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Go to the community college and save yourself some money. You might even get a better education as well. From my experience, I actually think some classes I took were better taught at the CC then the University.

If I could go back, I would have taken as many classes at a CC as possible. Smaller classes means more individual attention, and you get it for a much cheaper price. The capability to learn is within the learner and not the institution. I can actually say I've had better teachers at the CC than the University. Sure you had your PhDs professors, but they seemed more interested in research then in teaching. Most were power-point dependent lecturers with little encouragement of discussion. Some lower level classes were taught by TAs and you barely even saw the teacher. The huge classes meant most classes were graded on a curve. So you just had to be above the curve. The incentive to understand all the material wasn't there because the majority was banking on everyone else to mess it up. This hasn't been the case at the CC though. No curve. You get what you earn, which is the way it should be IMO. Otherwise you dumb down the grade and not give the credit due to those that did succeed in the effort to learn all the material.

I've become a big supporter of community colleges and what they can offer. I not only did well in the Chemistry and Physics courses, I've actually understood the material as well. I can't say for certain I would have had as much success at my old alma mater.