OnlyFearGOD

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Avid readers seem to do well on verbal passages without putting much effort in terms of heavy practices compared to those that don't read frequently.

So, is it plausible to say by reading everyday as well as grinding hard on the verbal passage, one may increase their verbal score ?
 

olemissbabydoc

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depends on what is being read and for how long. Reading every day might not pay off with less than a year to go - but if you've got longer than that to prepare it may help.

If you have trouble with reading speed, by all means, read every day no matter how long until your test. This would be one area that could make a significant difference in VR score.
 

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megaman
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In my humble opinion, I think reading everyday for the purpose of the verbal section is a pointless waste of time. But to each his own. :thumbup:
 
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junkct

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In my humble opinion, I think reading everyday for the purpose of the verbal section is a pointless waste of time. But to each his own. :thumbup:
true. 4 min is a lot longer than you think. 150 words/min is very manageable, even if you aren't an avid reader.
 

BlueElmo

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Avid readers seem to do well on verbal passages without putting much effort in terms of heavy practices compared to those that don't read frequently.

So, is it plausible to say by reading everyday as well as grinding hard on the verbal passage, one may increase their verbal score ?
It can only help. Just read daily and consistently on good materials, but you need time. I would say about a year before you see results.
 

nancy88

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I agree with BlueElmo. I think you need at least a few solid months of tough reading to see a change.
 

scaredoflife

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man yeah I used to read a lot in the past and currently some in present. But I don't find that my reading helps any with verbal scores.
 

olemissbabydoc

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Magazines/journals like the economist, the atlantic, ny post... anything written on a more educated level.

avoid newsweek, time. etc- these are usually written at the average american's reading level (which was, last I heard, 8th grade).
 

Tekbright510

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As has been said, unless you have a significant amount of time until test day (more than a year), starting to read a lot may not make a great deal of difference for your VR score.

The best practice is doing actual passages until you are nauseous at the sight of another. Work on a good timing strategy, try to become more efficient at assimilating information and answering questions. Gain a feel for the type of questions asked and the type of answers sought. The hardest part about VR, in my opinion, is timing. That's why reading outside material may not have a big yield.
 

scaredoflife

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tennisball80

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The short stories don't help so much because they don't ask like MCAT stories. I would recommend you going through Examkrackers 101 passages and find where you did wrong. I'm planning to do a bunch of reading passages before graduation.
 
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