SN2ed

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Usually, it ends up working against you far more than helping. What happens is that you try to focus on those 7 or so questions while reading. By the time you're done reading the passage, you've forgotten most of the questions, not found your answers for the ones you did remember, and, most importantly, you don't have the main idea or author's opinion. Furthermore, reading the questions can color your judgment and/or split your concentration which makes it more difficult to find the main idea. Now if this was simply finding little details here and there, things would be different, However, MCAT verbal is primarily focused on capturing the main idea, not finding details.
 

Segovia

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Usually, it ends up working against you far more than helping. What happens is that you try to focus on those 7 or so questions while reading. By the time you're done reading the passage, you've forgotten most of the questions, not found your answers for the ones you did remember, and, most importantly, you don't have the main idea or author's opinion. Furthermore, reading the questions can color your judgment and/or split your concentration which makes it more difficult to find the main idea. Now if this was simply finding little details here and there, things would be different, However, MCAT verbal is primarily focused on capturing the main idea, not finding details.

Well said. This is a strategy that lends itself better to the standardized tests given in middle school, and perhaps to a lesser degree, the SAT. My aunt was an elementary school teacher and this is what she used to tell her kids to do for their mandated testing, and she touted this method's effectiveness. We got into a discussion about strategies on verbal tests, and it was clear by our discussion that the MCAT is a distinct beast with its own reward system. Of course, you can always try it out and see if it works for you.
 

LostInStudy

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It has worked for some people, not many but it has worked. Try it out and see how you do. Try it out more than once and see if you can develop it and get comfortable with it. If you do well then great, if not then go with something else.

-LIS
 
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sometimes i think it really pays off for those questions asking to refer to some specific word and its context. it saves me a lot of time to highlight it as i read it, instead of having to double back and find it. what do you guys think?
 

SN2ed

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sometimes i think it really pays off for those questions asking to refer to some specific word and its context. it saves me a lot of time to highlight it as i read it, instead of having to double back and find it. what do you guys think?
That's true, it will help for those questions. However, the pay off of losing focus on the main idea and author's opinion is still too high. Often times, the detail questions can be answered with those two tools. I didn't believe it at first either, but it works.
 

Simplify

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I save the word hunt questions for last on each passage. No matter how well I pay attention during the read, I find that I'll go back for clarification on at least 2 or 3 questions. By the time I've answered the other questions I usually know exactly where the italicized word is. I'm getting 10-12 on every AAMC FL verbal FWIW.
 
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I actually find it to help a lot. It gives you a focus and point when you read so you can quickly skim the things you know aren't in the questions. When you reach a question you can stop and answer it right there. I think most people are too concerned with reading fast but I think it is useful to get a sense of what they want you to get out of it. I also think people are too lazy to try this effectively. Don't just give it a one-go. Try it on a Verbal section (whole test) and see how you feel. Practice it again. It isn't something that comes naturally and needs to be refined as a skill.
 
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To me, reading the questions first is a huge waste of time. I do typically scan for the "word" questions so that I know which word I need to understand and will have a better idea of the context and meaning for it (and it's easier to find that way, too).
 
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Did not work for me personally. TPR suggested i do it that way and i was getting 5 and 6 on the verbal section. I even believe a 4 once. Mainly due to rushing i think. I changed up my tactic and read the passage first and then went right into answering the quetions. My score isn't amazing but it got me by.