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Really Need Help On Some Stuff Before I Decide!

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by BrittMed, Aug 5, 2000.

  1. BrittMed

    BrittMed Junior Member

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    Its about time for me to choose a career choice here before i graduate from high school and Im EXTREMELY interested in medicine-thats my first choice but I have alot of questions about it. So if ANYONE can answer these for me i'd love you FOREVER!!!

    1. When you go into college-say I pick NYU-will my major be Pre-Medicine? If not what will it be?

    2. Approx. how long does it take me to finish school all together? I've heard between 7 and 13 years!!!

    3. Do i have to be BRILLIANT in science and math to be a medicine major?

    4. Is it as hard to get into a good premed school as people make it out to be?

    PLEASSSEEE SOMEONE ANSWER THESE!!! Im so nervous about this stuff!!!!! Thanks!!
     
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  3. jasmineH

    jasmineH Member
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    Usually people get a Bachelors degree in either Biology or Chemistry. A biology or Chemistry degree usually takes four years. Either of these degrees will INCLUDE Med school prerequistes, thats why its smart to go with one of these. Then you can apply to med school which is also four years.After med school you also have to do an additional year or so residency, its kind of like on the job training.So in the end your looking at 8 or so years of school.
     
  4. WingZero

    WingZero Senior Member
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    I don't think many schools have a "premed" major and even if they did, there's no good reason to do that major. Med school requirements can be met through almost any major - typically one year of bio, orgo, chem, phys with lab as well as english and a few upper level science courses. Major in something you're interested in, and if it's biology or chemistry, so be it. More and more applicants are applying to medical schools with humanities majors - they definitely get more "attention" or at least they have more to talk about at interviews, but again, don't choose a major based on what you think will increase your chances of acceptance. Just excel at whatever you choose. As for science course grades, it all depends what kind of medical school you want to get into, but you definitely want A's and B's for all science courses. If not, it puts you at a severe disadvantage, requiring you to really shine in other areas of your application. Many see people college simply as a means to an end (med school). Not surprisingly, they're the ones who enjoy their college years the least.

    I wouldn't say that people classify schools as being good "premed" schools. Medical school admissions committees do take into account what school you went to, but that is based on the school's overall reputation, not just the premedical aspect. As for difficulty, it's all relative and whether or not it's hard to get into a good "premed" school depends on what kind of person you are and how you've done in high school. Getting into medical school is much, much harder than getting into college. Getting into a good residency is even harder than getting into medical school (varies with specialty). Medical school is four years. Residencies range anywhere from 3 years (Internal Medicine) to Neurosurgery (7 years). This is not counting any fellowship work after residency for board certification. So including undergrad, you're looking at 11-15+ years of post-HS work. Jasmine's comment about "one year or so of residency" is referring to the intern year, after which you can be licensed to practice (only as a general practicioner). Going this route is not very common nowadays and you will have difficulty getting a good position and cannot be board certified. Almost everyone goes through an entire residency training program.

    It's great that you're planning so far ahead, although there's really no need to sweat these kinds of details at this point in time. Doing well at any reasonably recognized college and keeping the same intensity throughout while maintaining a "big picture" perspective will serve you well.

    Good luck.
     
  5. moo

    moo 1K Member
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    Wingzero pretty much sums it up. Volunteer, work at some health care facility, and get involved! Your major should be a carefully considered decision... Don't major in biochem or biology just because it seems like what all other premeds are doing. I almost made the stupid decision of majoring in biochem... thank God I didn't... I'm in physics/math and enjoying every minute of it.

    There's no such thing as a "medicine major". As Wingzero says, some schools have "pre-med/pre-dent" majors but I think these are a complete waste of time. You'll be bombarded enough in med school with biochem, anatomy and other rigorous courses. There's no need to do these courses now... In fact, some schools even discourage it.
     
  6. BrittMed

    BrittMed Junior Member

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    thanks alot everyone you've been a HUGE help! See Im still KINDA confused about my major though because i want to go to NYU and in the course book it says "pre-medicine" as a major so Im thinking if I get into there thats what I should take-also i've heard that your 3rd year of med school everyone drops out! Why?!!! Is it harder or something! Oh geesh im all nervous now!!! But thanks everyone!
     
  7. Hercules

    Hercules Son of Zeus
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    Just b/c your school has a "premed" major doesn't mean you have to take it. I know Wingzero and moo both told you that already, but sometimes it helps assure people to keep hearing the same advice over and over again. So here goes:
    The premed major at your school is probably a specialized track of Biology. Don't do this unless you just have an undying love for bio. The name of the game in applying to med school is differentiating yourself (in a good way) from the other applicants. If you go with the premed major, then you're just another bio major( which med schools see plenty of). If you have other interests besides biology I highly advise you to major in them, as this is the last real chance you'll get to explore those interests, and it will also help to make you stand out in an applicant pool.
    -Mike
    P.S. I'm a Classics major so I'm biased towards humanities [​IMG]
     
  8. BrittMed

    BrittMed Junior Member

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    Thanks SOOO much you guys that helps a ton! I really dont like Biology alot so I guess i'd be pretty screwed if I did a pre-med major! I like it but not enough to study it for 4 years! I really like law-if I wasnt going into Medicine I would go into Law-so would that be an OK major to center around? Or is it too far off from Medicine? Thanks again!!! Your all the biggest help EVER! I cant thank you enough!
     
  9. moo

    moo 1K Member
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    Brittmed, you can't "major" in law. Law is a profession, it's just like medicine. For mostlaw schools, I think you need at least two, maybe three years of undergrad before you can apply. If you're interested in law, but want to become a doctor, I suggest you major in poli sci or something like that. You'll have a better idea of what to do when you actually start college.
     
  10. GeoLeoX

    GeoLeoX Ancient
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    Yeah it's harder! Just kidding. Actually, most medical schools are set up that for your first 2 years you are involved in mostly "classroom education", after which the third and fourth years are the "on the job training" years. It is a very difficult transition to go from reading about a disease to seeing and helping a patient with said disease. That being said, many schools try to ease the transition by giving medical students patient contact from the get-go. Also many schools teach patient skills in a classroom setting during the first two years and then a "Transition to Clerkships" (i.e., third and fourth years) outlining your responsibilities and expectations as you begin to learn how to practice medicine.

    Geo

     
  11. BrittMed

    BrittMed Junior Member

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    Hey all again-I dont actually mean MAJOR in law-I know you cant do that-but there is pre-law and i checked the credits and everything and there up to standards to get into medical school but Im just wondering because its not really medical related will it be acceptable to med schools-also another thing (hehe-you guys are just so helpful Im gonna keep asking questions-hehe) im in a medical program at my high school-its #1 in the nation and it involves medical related classes-medical terminology, anatomy, all that kind of stuff-do you think it will be helpful for me?? Some say it will be some say it wont? Its a 2 year program and your second year (when your a senior) you go to the hospital for half the day and do hands on procedures and lab work-just wondering if in your opinion you'd think it is helpful?! THANKSSSSS!!!!!
     
  12. GeoLeoX

    GeoLeoX Ancient
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    Any major is "acceptable" to medical schools. You will just have to fulfill the science requirements as previously mentioned. The most important thing is that you enjoy what you are studying and you do well in your classes.

    Also, whoever told you that program wouldn't be helpful is wrong. I don't know you, I don't know the program, and I don't know the naysayers, but if you are accurate in your representation of the program it will give you something you will need to make your decision to enter medicine - EXPERIENCE.

    Nothing will help you decide whether medicine is for you or not like being in a hospital or clinic and seeing how it works. Plus, it will help you set up contacts that you will need later (Believe me, if you are like me, you will need all the help you can get).

    Geo

    ps. do you go to McKinley?

    [This message has been edited by GeoLeoX (edited 08-07-2000).]
     
  13. BrittMed

    BrittMed Junior Member

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    ps. do you go to McKinley?

    No-I go to Perry High School-I'll be in the Med-Tech program there-ranked first in the nation! Are you from here? Do you work at Mercy or Aultman???

     
  14. GeoLeoX

    GeoLeoX Ancient
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    no sir, I'm from Cleveland. I got my Ph.D. from Case and went to high school out in Mentor.

    Geo
     

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