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Reapplicants

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Rachmaninoff, Feb 2, 2002.

  1. Rachmaninoff

    Rachmaninoff New Member

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    Oct 14, 2001
    Hey all:

    How many times would you guys consider reapplying before you decided to pursue something else?
     
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  3. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    791
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    Jun 23, 2001
    i think this would depend upon how intelligently one goes about reapplying.
     
  4. THE instiGATOR

    THE instiGATOR Cow Tipper 7+ Year Member

    1,626
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    Sep 27, 2001
    I agree with sandflea.

    If I gave it my all, however, and still didn't manage to get in with 3 attempts; I'd pursue a masters degree. I don't think jumping into an advanced degree is the best initial response to rejection (unless your undergrad GPA is below a 3.0). It's much easier to boost the MCAT and accumulate more ECs than it is to acquire another degree (time-wise, at least). After getting a masters, I'd try again a couple times. If I still didn't get in, I might finish up grad studies for a PhD (and do a TON of soul searching) and give it one more shot. Hopefully nobody will be made to do this much, though!!!!
     
  5. Doctora Foxy

    Doctora Foxy Meow 7+ Year Member

    5,368
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    Jan 28, 2002
    I would reapply once, and if rejected I would try DO or orthodontics
     
  6. swampman, kuthastha, the town hero, has gone to those extremes. he didn't apply as many times (3 times BEFORE pursuing an advanced degree...geez i'm getting one in a year and this is my second time appying) but he's got the MS and PhD. but i think he wanted the PhD for his own sake, not to impress med schools. anyway, you'd be impressed how far and how much some people do. i think jalbrekt also went nutty with it. it's not JUST about the ends; the means matter most.
     
  7. THE instiGATOR

    THE instiGATOR Cow Tipper 7+ Year Member

    1,626
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    Sep 27, 2001
    Yeah, Caveman, some people do want advanced degrees. I, on the other hand, didn't feel the need or desire to get one. I absolutely hate my major, and don't want to dabble in anything else before going to med school. It's a long enough process without adding 4yrs required to attain a PhD.
     
  8. that's absolutely true. in my case, i was deciding between postbac and a one year master in science degree in biomedical sciences. i figured that although the postbac would help bring up my gpa and would only take one year, the master's degree would show my ability to handle an advanced grad curriculum, would also show my improvement grade-wise (although not helping my undergrad gpa), prepare me to ace the basic sciences in med school, and impress committees with that advanced degree.

    at this point, i'm thinking that doing the postbac would have helped me to get more interviews, so i'm pissed. but if i DO get in, i'll kick ass and end up with a better chance for a great residency than if I would have done the postbac. it's a trade off, but this (if it works!) will increase my chances to ace med school.
     
  9. otter

    otter Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    478
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    Oct 31, 2001
    Hi, I think I will apply three times before giving up and moving on to something else. At this point, I'm in the midst of my second try. With improved credentials this time around, and I was sure that I'd get at least 4 or 5 interviews. But no such luck.

    This second year of application has been a lot tougher to deal with than the first year. I left a very successful career to try my hand at getting into med school. I've been on a super-tight budget since and I have to say that my current situation is affecting my self-esteem. I'll apply again if I can't get in this year, but beyond that, I don't know if I can take any more of this emotional and financial beating. :confused:
     
  10. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    791
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    Jun 23, 2001
    well, if you all consider getting a masters as a way to improve one's credentials for med school as something 'nutty' to do, then i guess i went nutty too, although i don't see it as being such a drastic thing to do. getting a masters is what i actually was *advised* to do when i didn't get in the first time around, so that's what i did, and i'm 3 months away from an MPH. it's paid off. i did other things too, of course, things that i'm pretty proud of, but grades are such an important part of getting in that it was probably what made the most difference this time around (i didn't retake the MCAT). my undergrad GPA was the low-point of my first application so i knew that's what i had to fix. i took a year off before reapplying and took as many courses as i could for my masters in that year (while working full-time) so that i could bring my GPA up as much as possible before i reapplied.

    i never considered the post-bacc route. i'm of the firm belief that you shouldn't do something solely for the sake of impressing a med school adcom. i went for the masters in public health because once i finished the program, at least i would walk away with something tangible. plus i already had an interest in public health and knew it was a degree that would directly enhance my career. of course, whatever you do is worthwhile if it helps get you into med school, but at the same time, i didn't want to be miserable in the meantime.

    i don't think there's a set number of times that i would have 'planned' on reapplying before i gave up. not to sound all sappy, but medicine is what i've wanted to do my entire life so walking away from it wouldn't be easy at all. if i hadn't gotten in this year, i probably just would have continued taking classes to continue improving my GPA. it's not an adcom's job to tell me what to do with the rest of my life--that's my decision.
     
  11. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    2,615
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    Jul 26, 2000
    New York, NY
    I will reapply indefinitely until I'm in. :)
     
  12. gmendese

    gmendese Porn Star 7+ Year Member

    This is my third time applying and I've gotten two acceptances so far. All I got before was a stack of rejections. So, never lose hope!
     
  13. daisygirl

    daisygirl woof 15+ Year Member

    1,528
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    Nov 28, 2001
    perpetually cranky
    If I don't get in this time, I will retake the mcat and then reapply. The biggest weak spot on my application is my mcat score. I don't know if I would reapply a third time. That would take a lot of soul searching. Being a physician is the only thing that would make me happy professionally and personally, but waiting another two years to get in would be difficult on me b/c of personal issues (I'm married and my husband is older than me and we'll have family planning issues if I have to wait, etc.).

    Good luck to everyone, I am rooting for all of you! :)
     
  14. Doctora Foxy

    Doctora Foxy Meow 7+ Year Member

    5,368
    2
    Jan 28, 2002
    I was looking at the amcas website and it says the application for 2003 matriculation will be available on May 1, 2002. Didn't it used to be June 1st?

    If you might have to reapply and are considering the August MCAT, when do you plan on submitting AMCAS? Now that it appears to be available a month earlier, I don't want to apply in Ju ne and have it be considered late. :rolleyes:
     
  15. omores

    omores sleep deprived 10+ Year Member

    572
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    Jul 2, 2000
    Seattle
    I think May 1st is the first date you can access the application, not the first date you can submit it.
     
  16. Pip413

    Pip413 Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    13
    0
    Aug 28, 2001
    Connecticut
    I heard that applying to a school and then getting rejected hurts your chances when you reapply any time thereafter... do any of you guys know whether that's true or not. I mean do the schools actually keep your application on file or something?
     
  17. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    791
    1
    Jun 23, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Pip413:
    <strong>I heard that applying to a school and then getting rejected hurts your chances when you reapply any time thereafter... do any of you guys know whether that's true or not. I mean do the schools actually keep your application on file or something?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">this is not true--your chances aren't helped or hurt by having been rejected previously (unless there is some particular med school out there that does things this way). some schools do keep your previous application on file but often it's just for one year. however, i wouldn't bother reapplying *anywhere* until you make drastic changes to your application. you were rejected the first time for a reason--you need to fix that reason if you want to get in.
     
  18. pwrpfgrl

    pwrpfgrl Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    351
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    Jan 3, 2002
    school
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by sandflea:
    </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">this is not true--your chances aren't helped or hurt by having been rejected previously (unless there is some particular med school out there that does things this way). some schools do keep your previous application on file but often it's just for one year. however, i wouldn't bother reapplying *anywhere* until you make drastic changes to your application. you were rejected the first time for a reason--you need to fix that reason if you want to get in.[/QB][/QUOTE]

    I'm not 100% positive, but I think that Einstein will not accept your application if you have been rejected 2x before - I don't know if any other schools do this also
     
  19. Ceez

    Ceez Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    387
    4
    Mar 31, 2002
    I need a backup plan if I don't get in this year. Is it too late to apply to a master's program? And can it be done in one year?
     
  20. Assassin

    Assassin Assassin 7+ Year Member

    331
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    Jan 28, 2002
    Lebanon
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by sandflea:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Pip413:
    <strong>I heard that applying to a school and then getting rejected hurts your chances when you reapply any time thereafter... do any of you guys know whether that's true or not. I mean do the schools actually keep your application on file or something?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">this is not true--your chances aren't helped or hurt by having been rejected previously (unless there is some particular med school out there that does things this way). some schools do keep your previous application on file but often it's just for one year. however, i wouldn't bother reapplying *anywhere* until you make drastic changes to your application. you were rejected the first time for a reason--you need to fix that reason if you want to get in.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">you're DEFINITELY hurt by reapplying to the same schools, I speak both from experience and as corroborated by one of my pre-med advisors. If you're to reapply to the same school, they'll be expecting to see (as sandflea mentioned) DRASTIC changes in your file (for the better of course <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" /> ). On the other hand, even if you don't change a thing about your application (assuming it was ok to beging with of course), you may have an excellent shot at being admitted to a different school you haven't applied yet, cause well, it's all a crapshoot!
     
  21. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    791
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    Jun 23, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by player:<strong> you're DEFINETELY hurt by reapplying to the same schools, I speak both from experience and as corroborated by one of my pre-med advisors. If you're to reapply to the same school, they'll be expecting to see (as sandflea mentioned) DRASTIC changes in your file (for the better of course <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" /> ). On the other hand, even if you don't change a thing about your application (assuming it was ok to beging with of course), you may have an excellent shot at being admitted to a different school you haven't applied yet, cause well, it's all a crapshoot!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">simply submitting the same application to a school that previously rejected you doesn't necessarily *hurt* you per se--it's just that submitting an app that hasn't changed isn't going to help, simply because the credentials you present on that app have already been demonstrated to not be enough to get you into that particular school. this doesn't mean you can't get in there, however--just that the odds are against it, because you were rejected for a reason the first time around. but i have known people who have been accepted to schools the second time without having changed a thing on their applications. was this a wise move to make? definitely not--they are *extremely lucky* to have gotten in anywhere. but it just goes to show you how random the process is--it's the same logic that explains why you can get an interview at a certain school one year but then not the next, all things on your app being the same.

    yes, some schools limit the number of times you can apply, not just einstein. loyola is the only other one i can think of at the moment but i know there are others.
     
  22. CoffeeCat

    CoffeeCat SDN Angel 10+ Year Member

    1,041
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    Jun 3, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Ceez:
    <strong>I need a backup plan if I don't get in this year. Is it too late to apply to a master's program? And can it be done in one year?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Check out Georgetown Masters in Physiology degree...I've been impressed with it so far. The website is: <a href="http://www.go.to/physio" target="_blank">Georgetown</a> And there's also a discussion board where current "physios" will talk with you about the program, <a href="http://group.yahoo.com/group/physios" target="_blank">Yahoo Physios</a> . They take applications until June, it's a one year program and you take classes alongside med students. It's main goal is to improve your GPA. Good luck!! :D
     
  23. Samoa

    Samoa Physician Pharmacist 10+ Year Member

    8,324
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    Feb 14, 2002
    I too considered getting a masters in public health vs. taking postbacc classes. The MPH would have helped my current career immensely, since it would have required a statement of support from my employer, who was more than willing to give it at that time. But I already have a graduate degree with a reasonable GPA. So I asked for advice from one of the schools where I'd been rejected, and was basically told that a strong postbacc record would help me more than an MPH. I was told that the rest of my application is fine, but that my undergrad GPA is what's keeping me from getting accepted. They were also curious why I had no LOR from my employer.

    Having decided to take postbacc classes instead of getting my MPH, and in asking for a letter of recommendation, it was clear to my employer that advancing in my current career was not my priority. Which has had some serious consequences for me.

    So right now, I really feel like the personal cost of pursuing this goal has gotten far higher than it ever ought to be for anyone. And having sacrificed so much, I may still never get in. Anyway, I don't mean to whine. It's just that i'ts been a difficult year for me, and after not even getting an interview, it seems like a huge waste to have endured so much crap from all sides.

    So now my MCAT scores have expired, and I have to retake it. It's actually a good thing, because although no one would say it, I know that one of my scores was conspicuously low. Now I have a chance to fix it.

    In answer to the main question on this thread, I don't know how many times I'm willing to apply. I don't even want to deal with it this year, and I may very well find that I like my new job enough to stay in my current profession. For sure, I am having lots of trouble writing YET ANOTHER personal statement. What is there left to say? And it's not like any school is even reading it--I can't even get past the initial screen because of my GPA.

    Anyway, I have no wisdom to share on this topic. Only frustration.
     
  24. otter

    otter Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    478
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    Oct 31, 2001
    Samoa, looks like you've put in a lot of sacrifices that haven't paid off. I'm really sorry. If you don't mind, what is your graduate degree in, and what are your undergrad GPA and your MCAT scores?
     
  25. Samoa

    Samoa Physician Pharmacist 10+ Year Member

    8,324
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    Feb 14, 2002
    I've been hesitant to share too much about my degrees or profession, for a lot of reasons I won't go into here. But the rest I'll be happy to share. MCAT 33-35O, UGPA 2.5, GGPA 3.4 at a very high-ranked, competitive school for that program, PBGPA 3.85, should go up to 3.9 after this semester. I can only take 1-2 classes per semester, so I'll have about 20 hours after this semester. I've had an enviable career so far, and my colleagues think I'm completely nuts to want to go to med school.
     
  26. THE instiGATOR

    THE instiGATOR Cow Tipper 7+ Year Member

    1,626
    3
    Sep 27, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by player:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by sandflea:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Pip413:
    <strong>I heard that applying to a school and then getting rejected hurts your chances when you reapply any time thereafter... do any of you guys know whether that's true or not. I mean do the schools actually keep your application on file or something?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">this is not true--your chances aren't helped or hurt by having been rejected previously (unless there is some particular med school out there that does things this way). some schools do keep your previous application on file but often it's just for one year. however, i wouldn't bother reapplying *anywhere* until you make drastic changes to your application. you were rejected the first time for a reason--you need to fix that reason if you want to get in.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">you're DEFINETELY hurt by reapplying to the same schools, I speak both from experience and as corroborated by one of my pre-med advisors. If you're to reapply to the same school, they'll be expecting to see (as sandflea mentioned) DRASTIC changes in your file (for the better of course <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" /> ). On the other hand, even if you don't change a thing about your application (assuming it was ok to beging with of course), you may have an excellent shot at being admitted to a different school you haven't applied yet, cause well, it's all a crapshoot!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">The school I will be attending in the fall rejected me without an interview last year. :cool:
     
  27. otter

    otter Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    478
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    Oct 31, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Samoa:
    <strong>I've been hesitant to share too much about my degrees or profession, for a lot of reasons I won't go into here. But the rest I'll be happy to share. MCAT 33-35O, UGPA 2.5, GGPA 3.4 at a very high-ranked, competitive school for that program, PBGPA 3.85, should go up to 3.9 after this semester. I can only take 1-2 classes per semester, so I'll have about 20 hours after this semester. I've had an enviable career so far, and my colleagues think I'm completely nuts to want to go to med school.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Samoa, let me talk a bit about myself because I see a bit of similarities, then give you some advices.

    Like you, I had a very enviable career. I was an engineer and got paid tons. In fact, the money I saved up in two years from that job has supported me for 3 years since I left to take on this medicine thing. My ex-boss told me to reconsider it, because this was equivalent to a financial suicide. But I was determined, so quit I did. It took me 2 years to get my candidacy up to a respectable shape. I did a lot of volunteer work and took some classes. I love my volunteer work and work hard at it, but clearly some aspects of community work and volunteering were not suited to my strengths. While I shot up the ladder as an engineer, I almost got fired by one of my volunteer supervisors. Anyways, I applied in 2000 with good GPA (3.6) but bad MCAT (27). I got rejected everywhere. I improved my MCAT to 30 and reapplied in 2001. So far, I've got 4 interviews and 0 acceptance, although I'm still holding out some hope. These 3 years have been rough; in a lot of ways, I feel like I'm naturally good in engineering and I have to work hard to become good in some aspects of medicine. But I am absolutely passionate about medicine, and I'll reapply if I don't get in this year. I think it's important to follow through on things you feel passionate about.

    As for your situation, what you need to do is get your postbac classes up to about 35 hours with ~3.8 gpa. Seeing that your undergrad GPA is 2.5, you'll never get your GPA above 3.0 unless you take like 90 PB hours (not worth it). But you don't necessarily have to. I've come across so many posts here by people who've gotten into med schools after making amends through excellent postbac work following washed-up undergrad years. By the way, you may still have a chance to get your BCPM GPA up to a respectable level. You'll also need to take on some clinical activities (volunteering). You say that your MCATs will expire. I think it's more like each school sets different expiration date. I think it's 3 years for many schools, while it's longer for others. I could be wrong about this, but check to see if you really need to retake your MCAT. As long as you'll have about 20 mainly 2nd and 3rd-tier schools to apply to, you may not need to retake it because your scores are really good. If this is not the case, then forget what I said. Finally, you'll really need to sell yourself in the next application as a person who's turned things around, rededicated himself to his goals and will not give up, but now feels really well-prepared to take on med schools as evidenced by good grad gpa and even better pb gpa. I'm sure that a majority of schools will continue to be unforgiving of your undergrad gpa but that some schools will take notice of your subsequent performance and forgive you for your lack of focus years and years ago.
     
  28. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    791
    1
    Jun 23, 2001
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Bubba Swamp:
    <strong>The school I will be attending in the fall rejected me without an interview last year. :cool: </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">the school i'll be attending rejected me too without interview the first time around. :cool:
     

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