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Recent "Minor" Academic Institutional Action and T20 chances... Seeking Advice

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mikesheree

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LizzyM, I will grant that my perspective is much different than other physicians who had their histories examined with a fine-toothed comb, because I was a pathologist (although I did a clinical internship in the “good old days” and a couple years of gp). It may well have a higher significance to my clinician colleagues. Darned few people knew who it was who diagnosed their cancer. The majority, I am quite sure, thought it was their surgeon, etc!
And, I applauded you for the years of effort you have devoted to trying to help the bright young folks on this board with your expertise. You do it out of selflessness and you deserve the undying gratitude of the prospective students.
As to your cultural reference, it had zero impact on my comments. Perhaps it should have, but it did not. When you
are 70 yo with the decades behind me that I have had, medical school is medical school, college is college and high school is high school.
 
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mikesheree

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I hear you, but you're not seriously suggesting we should all withdraw all of our applications as soon as we receive our first acceptance, are you? If not, why shouldn't OP apply out if it's allowed by the program? What's the difference?

You have a point and, I believe, a very valid one. On the other hand, consider the analogy of roulette.

You scatter 12, $100 chips over 12 separate numbers. ANY one you hit ( and they were all YOUR choices) makes you a 35 to 1 winner and you lose the other 11 grand. You have done very well among YOUR choices. I would immediately cash out after that one spin.
 
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KnightDoc

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You have a point and, I believe, a very valid one. On the other hand, consider the analogy of roulette.

You scatter 12, $100 chips over 12 separate numbers. ANY one you hit ( and they were all YOUR choices) makes you a 35 to 1 winner and you lose the other 11 grand. You have done very well among YOUR choices. I would immediately cash out after that one spin.
In a world where Harvard really equaled Kutztown State, you'd be right, but that's not the world we live in.

To some, NY is more attractive than Cleveland, and #3 is more attractive than #73. Moreover, and this where the rubber really hits the road, more acceptances means more opportunities at merit scholarships, that can often be used to leverage discounts at your top choice, even if that turns out to be the first school that accepted you.

In fact, unless you have tremendous demonstrable financial need and have an acceptance at your top choice that has a very generous financial aid budget, THIS is the very reason people soldier on after receiving an acceptance at a school they'd be very happy at. Beyond ego and prestige, this is likely another reason OP is applying out.
 
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mikesheree

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In a world where Harvard really equaled Kutztown State, you'd be right, but that's not the world we live in.

To some, NY is more attractive than Cleveland, and #3 is more attractive than #73. Moreover, and this where the rubber really hits the road, more acceptances means more opportunities at merit scholarships, that can often be used to leverage discounts at your top choice, even if that turns out to be the first school that accepted you.

In fact, unless you have tremendous demonstrable financial need and have an acceptance at your top choice that has a very generous financial aid budget, THIS is the very reason people soldier on after receiving an acceptance at a school they'd be very happy at. Beyond ego and prestige, this is likely another reason OP is applying out.

As I said, you have a valid point. My point is: goal #1— Get into a US allopathic or osteopathic medical school.
Goal #2—— any other considerations you may have.
 
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I also completely disagree that no one cares where you went to school. When my mom needed her cancer excised she felt much more relieved when she found out her surgeon graduated from Penn. I see judgement very frequently towards doctors based on where they graduated.
Of all examples, Penn? The most confused school on the planet? I think 99% of the U.S. population thinks Penn is a state school, not to mention that it is a medical school (and a great one). Somehow even some people in philly don't know. :p I don't think the majority of the united states can identify 'prestigious' schools beyond the hyp and stanford colleges and the best school in their local vicinity that they were told about in high school.
 
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DoctorFate

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Of all examples, Penn? The most confused school on the planet? I think 99% of the U.S. population thinks Penn is a state school, not to mention that it is a medical school (and a great one). Somehow even some people in philly don't know. :p I don't think the majority of the united states can identify 'prestigious' schools beyond the hyp and stanford colleges and the best school in their local vicinity that they were told about in high school.
Haha, we live in Pennsylvania, so that may be why. I certainly agree that a school like Pitt, a top med school, would be barely known outside of medicine and outside of PA.
 
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Pyroman

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No interview invites yet, as I'm still working on secondaries :oops:

Also, an additional question here. One of my recommenders is part of the faculty/Deans at my school and is asking if they should specifically address the IA and speak to my character in the letter. I'm conflicted on whether it'll be bad to call more attention to this IA, or helpful to have a faculty member's comments on this in my application. I am not sure what to tell them, do you all have any advice on what to do?
 

LizzyM

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No interview invites yet, as I'm still working on secondaries :oops:

Also, an additional question here. One of my recommenders is part of the faculty/Deans at my school and is asking if they should specifically address the IA and speak to my character in the letter. I'm conflicted on whether it'll be bad to call more attention to this IA, or helpful to have a faculty member's comments on this in my application. I am not sure what to tell them, do you all have any advice on what to do?

If it was the faculty member whose rule you broke, then maybe it would help. If it is someone who sees you as an honest person but knows of your transgression either because they were on the review board or otherwise involved in adjudication or someone who knows of it only because you've talked of it with them, that's debatable. On the one hand, it is nice to have someone vouch for you but what is that really saying.... I could say that someone never cheated in my class, or never assaulted me, or whatever and it doesn't mean that they didn't behave badly with someone else. Also, it is possible that a school would restrict access to the IA section of the AMCAS and not make that viewable by reviewers and/or interviewers so as not to bias them but if the LORs are shared and something is in a letter, now you've introduced that bias to the interviewer, and without the benefit of hearing your side of the story.
 
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Pyroman

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If it was the faculty member whose rule you broke, then maybe it would help. If it is someone who sees you as an honest person but knows of your transgression either because they were on the review board or otherwise involved in adjudication or someone who knows of it only because you've talked of it with them, that's debatable. On the one hand, it is nice to have someone vouch for you but what is that really saying.... I could say that someone never cheated in my class, or never assaulted me, or whatever and it doesn't mean that they didn't behave badly with someone else. Also, it is possible that a school would restrict access to the IA section of the AMCAS and not make that viewable by reviewers and/or interviewers so as not to bias them but if the LORs are shared and something is in a letter, now you've introduced that bias to the interviewer, and without the benefit of hearing your side of the story.
That clears things up a lot, thank you!! It's not the same faculty member, so I'll ask them to withhold writing about the IA in their letter.
 
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