woof_iamadog

2+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2016
22
5
Status
Medical Student
Hi. I will be starting med school at NYU in a few weeks. I am extremely interested in PM&R, so much so that I may apply for NYU's 3-year accelerated MD program (the MD program is consolidated into 3 years and you go directly into the NYU residency that you apply for).

A lot of the posts about the NYU PM&R residency seem to be pretty old (like at least 8 years old).

Does anyone have any recent descriptions / experiences with the NYU PM&R residency? Specifically...

- How much time is spent inpatient vs outpatient?

- How much focus is on MSK stuff vs TBI related stuff?

- What's the general atmosphere? More calm or high intensity? Friendly/collegial or cut throat?

- What are the main skills you are gaining, and what do you wish you spent more time on?

Thanks!
 

Bostonspine

2+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2016
40
23
34
Status
Attending Physician
I'll buy bite I finished 2yrs ago, half in patient and half out patient I did 1/3 va, 1/3 Rusk/NYU (mostly commercial/Medicare), 1/3 Bellevue indengent care. Broad experience good general training. Msk exposure is good but it's not mayo... if you wanna do true sport(university) or spinal injection you need a fellowship. Half went to fellowship half went to private practice


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Mar 27, 2013
14
0
Status
Medical Student
I just finished residency at NYU this year. I'm very happy with the training I received.

I saw a great deal of positive change over the three years I was there, probably the chief among them was the restructuring of the rotation curriculum. When I started, PGY2 year was 12 months of inpatient, and another 6 months of it during PGY3. It's now 12 months total spread out so that PGY2 residents get a few outpatient months in for sanity. The balance was made up with more sports, consult and EMG rotations. Residents were encouraged and empowered to take part in the residency improvement process, and I really appreciated the concern for our wellness.

I think the strength of the program is that you will see everything here (except for vented SCI), in fact NYU provides rotations in Peds and TBI for other residencies in the area. You'll work with veterans, the affluent and the destitute. I think the service responsibility continues to be an area for improvement. The inpatient sites are in different locations which probably make for more call than most residencies. The program has been consistently hiring midlevels to unburden residents, though, so I imagine that this will continue to improve.
 
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woof_iamadog

2+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2016
22
5
Status
Medical Student
These replies have been super helpful. Thanks everyone!

Did you have decent exposure in prosthetics and orthotics as well? I am super interested in prosthetics and that's one of the reasons I'm drawn to PM&R.

Do you all feel equipped enough to go into an Neuromusculoskeletal focused practice? Or is a fellowship necessary?

@trackrunner1500 How tough was intern year? Did you get to do a PM&R rotation?

I've heard that in general the PM&R residency isn't too crazy hour-wise, but that it varies by program.

What does an average week as a PM&R NYU resident look like? How many hours at its worst (I assume that's during inpatient time) and how many on average?

Sorry for all the questions.

Thanks!
 
Sep 6, 2018
1
0
The residency program has been making its steady curvature in a positive direction in many aspects. The evolution of the positivity of the residency program has been quite conspicuous, noted by the faculty, and current residents including myself. Dr. Moroz, the program director with his insightful, and unparalleled support of each resident’s well-being and education has been providing resident leadership team with a mandatory, and routine table discussion to identify areas needing improvement and turn ideas into action. The positive changes that I have witnessed in the past two years were more than I could have hoped for from a trainee perspective. Some of the changes include well-dispersed inpatient rotations, learning-oriented reconstruction of the curriculum/didactics, well-structured, mandatory faculty to resident feedback system, mentorship team, moonlighting opportunities, spine/pain interest group, EMG club, resident wellness events, lots of networking opportunities, and many more. This year, we have been rated as #1 in research productivity; the width of the variety of pathology (in both adults and children) one may expect to see during his/her training years here at Rusk, in my humble opinion, is unbeatable. During my PGY 3 year, my colleague and I had the highest number of case report acceptances at a single national conference in the nation (14 case report acceptances). It would not have been possible unless we were exposed to the wide variety of pathology seen at Rusk. If you come here as a resident, this is the place that can and will train you to become a leader in the field. If I could go back in time, I would still rank NYU as my number 1 choice with no hesitation and I mean every word stated above.
 
Aug 31, 2018
26
60
The review I had gotten on Rusk wasn't too good. 7am-7pm work days, night call covering 50-100 beds, huge class size, few in-house fellowships.

Their biggest selling point along other students I rotate with is the location. I havent head any other positives said of the program itself.

I cant imagine they do too well on the SAEs either when put up against residents from other programs who have much more study time. Is there a fellowship placement list published anywhere?
 
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rehab ready

2+ Year Member
Mar 15, 2017
1
0
The review I had gotten on Rusk wasn't too good. 7am-7pm work days, night call covering 50-100 beds, huge class size, few in-house fellowships.

Their biggest selling point along other students I rotate with is the location. I havent head any other positives said of the program itself.

I cant imagine they do too well on the SAEs either when put up against residents from other programs who have much more study time. Is there a fellowship placement list published anywhere?
This was several years ago back when the old RUSK building was around. It was destroyed in hurricane Sandy. Now the most beds we cover at once is on call at one of the 4 locations and is roughly 40 beds. On inpatient we really try to get residents out as close to 5pm as possible and really emphasize teamwork to make this happen. There has been much improvement in the program, especially in the past 3 years!
 
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