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Recommendation Letters

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Mossjoh, Jan 2, 2001.

  1. Mossjoh

    Mossjoh Mayo Clinic-PGY2
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    I'm beginning to start the process of getting ready to ask for recommendation letters. What information should I give the docs? I was thinking my resume, a personal statement, my experience/community service record, and a copy of my transcript. Any other suggestions?
     
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  3. wooo

    wooo Senior Member
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    sounds good.

    Just when you ask, use the word favorable in the sentence.

    I was wondering if you would be willing to write a "favorable" letter of recommendation for my application package to medical school?

    Stress the word and pay close attention to their reaction? I asked one prof. and he said yes, but I could tell by his reaction that it was going to be a standard letter. I never got back in touch with him.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. I basically said "I'm applying to medical school. Would you be comfortable writing a strong positive letter of recommendation for me?" I asked everyone, no matter what grade I got in their class, and observed their reactions. From about 15 professors, I narrowed it down to the 4 that ended up having an hour long conversation with me after asking that question. Trust me, you'll know if they're going to do it or not.



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    Imtiaz
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    I write messages on money.
    It's my own form of social protest.
    A letter printed on paper that no one will destroy.
    Passed indiscriminately across race, class, and gender lines, and written on the blood that keeps the beast alive.
    A quiet little hijacking on the way to the checkout counter, and a federal crime.
    I hope that someone will find my message one day when they really need it.
    YOU ARE NOT A SLAVE.
     
  5. Also, I'd like to add that they all said yes. Just goes to show that just because they say yes doesn't mean they'll follow through with it.

    ------------------
    Imtiaz
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    I write messages on money.
    It's my own form of social protest.
    A letter printed on paper that no one will destroy.
    Passed indiscriminately across race, class, and gender lines, and written on the blood that keeps the beast alive.
    A quiet little hijacking on the way to the checkout counter, and a federal crime.
    I hope that someone will find my message one day when they really need it.
    YOU ARE NOT A SLAVE.
     
  6. Dodge This

    Dodge This Senior Member
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    I prepped a portfolio for each of my letter-writers. I don't think presentation should be overlooked. If you take the time to hand them something (complete with "Prepared for Dr. ____" on the cover), they'll remember you and know you take their recommendation seriously. This is what went into mine:

    1. cover letter

    2. complete AMCAS application (personal statement, schools applied, basic info, etc.)

    3. official transcript

    4. photo

    5. envelope and form to send to my advising office, which forwarded letters to each school

    If you're already asking for letters for admission in 2002, you're way ahead of the game. Plenty of time until June 1.
     
  7. SammyK

    SammyK Senior Member
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    I agree completely with adding the word favorable to your request. I know of a person who asked a peer (my pre-professional comittee accepts peer references when compiling their evaluation) because she heard he was a good writer. This aforementioned person had great academic stats (3.9 GPA, 34 MCAT, lots of research, etc) but her personality was a bit on the grating side to say the least. So the peer reviewer wrote in his letter that although she had the academic ability to be a good medical student, he felt she lacked the people skills and the maturity to be a good physician as well as other comments along the same line. She ended up getting accepted to one school that was her safety net after applying to 10+ schools. I think she ended up deferring and reapplying. She eventually got into a school she felt was better. The point being what a lot of extra headaches that could perhaps have been avoided. It is an interesting story.

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    the only normal people are the ones you don't know yet

    [This message has been edited by SammyK (edited 01-05-2001).]
     

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