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This fellowship is designed for graduates of a residency program in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with a strong interest in Interventional Sports and Spine Medicine with a focus on orthobiologic therapies. Qualified applicants must have a strong interest in clinical research. This fellowship is 12 months long and takes place at premier sports and spine private practice on the Upper East Side in Manhattan, New York City. Time spent in the program will be divided into approximately 60% clinical and 40% research each week. Candidates who have completed training and have been out in practice but are interested in further skill development are encouraged to apply.

Qualifications:

Successful completion of residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Interventional musculoskeletal and or spine fellowship is preferred but not required. Candidates must feel comfortable with the basics of ultrasound diagnostics (minimum of 20 diagnostic scans required), ultrasound-guided injections (minimum of 20), and fluoroscopically guided spine injections (minimum of 100).

Clinical Goals:

o Hone skills in the clinical evaluation, diagnosis, and management of painful spine and musculoskeletal pathologies. This includes review of diagnostic imaging.

o Gain procedural skill in fluoroscopically interventional spine procedures (~20% cervical, 10% thoracic, and %70 lumbosacral) and peripheral joint and soft tissue injections (fluoroscopically and/or ultrasound guided).

Research Goals:

o Hone skills in collaborative research design, data collection, presentation, and manuscript preparation for publication.

o Research will include translational basic science topics, in addition to clinical outcomes for interventional spine, joint, and soft tissue orthobiologics.

Program start: July 1, 2021

Number of positions: 1

Length of Program: 12 months

Facility: Four fellowship trained attending physicians with academic affiliations, two procedure rooms both with ultrasound and one with brand new c-arm, MRI machine in house for each of diagnostics and research, diagnostic x-ray in house.

Program director: Greg Lutz, MD

To apply, please send your CV, a cover letter indicating reasons for interest, and two letters of recommendation commenting on research skills, clinical skill, and procedural skill to Dr. Mairin Jerome at [email protected] (please also send a text notifying of application sent with email address to 401-301-6247 to confirm receipt). Letters of reference should be emailed directly from the offices of the person writing the letter. For those still in training, one letter of recommendation must be from the program director of your current training program. Deadline to apply: February 21, 2021.

Applications will be screened and if you are selected for an interview, this will occur via zoom. A final selection will be made by March 15th.



New Jersey Regenerative Institute is pleased to offer a unique, non-accredited fellowship in Interventional Orthopedics and Orthobiologics. Under the direction of Dr. Gerard Malanga and in conjunction with Drs. Thomas Agesen and Jay Bowen, this 1 year fellowship will run from August 2021-August 2022, and will provide exposure to variety of sports and orthopedic conditions. The fellowship will include: sports coverage, electrodiagnosis, diagnostic and interventional ultrasound, peripheral joint and a variety of fluoroscopic spinal injections. The fellow will also be educated in the basic science and clinical application of Orthobiologics including: platelet-rich plasma, bone marrow and adipose procedures. An emphasis will be made on understanding the most current, scientifically validated measures in obtaining and delivering these tissues as well as the holistic approach to the patient both prior to and after treatment including important post-operative rehabilitation concepts.

New Jersey Regenerative Institute (NJRI) is a center of excellence with top ratings in clinical care, educational training for medical students, residents and fellows from Rutgers School of Medicine, Atlantic Sports Health and other programs across the country. NJRI is also a major research center working with the Kessler Foundation as well as a study site for several ongoing research activities with multiple publications in various journals. NJRI has had an ongoing database for several years and is an integral part of a national database registry in Orthobiologic treatments called Databiologics.

Applications will be accepted from December 2020-January 15, 2021. A select number of candidates will be called for interviews with a final selection occurring by February 2021.

All interested candidates should email Jacquie Wojak at: [email protected] for an application and other necessary items for their application.



The Centeno-Schultz Clinic was the first practice in the US to use stem cells for orthopedic injuries way back in 2005 by treating joints and low back disc problems. Since then, we’ve continued to advance the art of regenerative medicine and the specialty of interventional orthopedics. We’ve made many advances in how cells are harvested, processed, and re-implanted. We’ve developed new procedural techniques and devices. As examples, we run a state of the art stem cell biology facility that includes a large clean room processing space and a separate privately funded university style research lab. This allows us to custom fit cell based therapies to our patients rather than trying to fit our patients into to what a simple automated machine could produce. As another example, rather than blindly injecting stem cells into joints and hoping that they end up in the right place, we’ve developed new interventional techniques to precisely place cells in various areas of the MSK system. For instance, we pioneered the percutaneous placement of stem cells into the ACL ligament. This technique simply didn’t exist before we realized that many of these patients could avoid surgery by accurately placing stem cells into the ligament to heal partial and full thickness tears. Another example of our innovation is in house lab research that lead to a process to dramatically increase the number of stem cells that could be isolated from bone marrow in a same day procedure.

What is Interventional Orthopedics?
We believe that due to advances in regenerative medicine, the rapid evolution in interventional cardiology that happened in the 1980-90s to today will happen in orthopedic care. In the 1980s, most major heart problems were treated with CABG. However, a quiet revolution took place that changed the status quo. Cardiologists began experimenting with percutaneous angioplasty. With every passing year from the 1980′s through the 1990′s, fewer and fewer patients needed open heart surgery and a new medical specialty was born – interventional cardiology. As time went by, more and more surgical procedures were switched to percutaneous. We believe the same thing is happening in orthopedic care with interventional orthopedics replacing more and more surgical procedures using various platelet, cytokine, and growth factor treatments as well as stem cells. We also believe that an interventional orthopedics expert needs to be able to place needle and regenerative therapeutics everywhere from the C0-C1 facet joint to the ankle TT joint or in any accessible tendon or ligament under fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance. In summary, our fellowship is the best of an interventional spine fellowship combined with the best of a sports fellowship, but focused on the future by providing extensive experience in PRP and stem cell treatment.

Interventional Orthopedics Fellowship Overview and Qualifications

The fellowship being offered by the Centeno-Schultz Clinic (CSC) in Interventional Orthopedics and Regenerative Medicine is 12 months long, interviews typically occur in the first part of the year with the final selections made by early fall. The fellowship year will be broken up as follows:

60% Clinical Care with a focus on the use of various percutaneous stem cell and platelet technologies in regenerative medicine.
40% Research- The fellow must complete a research project under CSC supervision and submit same for publication. This includes interaction with the onsite, stem cell research lab.

Qualifications- has or seeking board certification in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Anesthesiology Pain Medicine or Family Practice, Sports Medicine.

The candidate will be proficient with basic lumbar spine procedures:
At least 100 performed lumbar joint injections (facets, MBBs and SI joint) under fluoroscopy
At least 100 performed lumbar epidurals (TFs, caudals, ILs)
The candidate will be familiar with basic diagnostic ultrasound exams and have experience with needle guidance under ultrasound for basic procedures:
40 or more performed peripheral joint diagnostic ultrasound examinations (shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, etc.)
20 or more performed peripheral joint injections under ultrasound guidance (shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, etc.)

How do I Apply?
To apply, please contact Eric Speer at [email protected] and submit the following information below by June 29th, 2020:

A signed letter by your Program Director verifying the prerequisite training will be completed by the end of your residency (letter attached)
CV

A writing sample: A literature review with a maximum of one page in length. The topic is the “correlation between lumbar multifidus atrophy and axial lower back pain and radiculopathy”

A letter of recommendation from an outpatient MSK attending

We will start interviews via Skype for early candidates in June followed by in-person interviews July and August.
 
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Bostonspine

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Sounds like a great way to get cheap labor I feel like 20yrs ago this would have been part of an associate track and now they are capitalizing on the desire for validation without a meaningful certification.
 
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Sounds like a great way to get cheap labor I feel like 20yrs ago this would have been part of an associate track and now they are capitalizing on the desire for validation without a meaningful certification.
Learning to make mu shu for beaucoup dollareenos.
 
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Bostonspine

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Learning to make mu shu for beaucoup dollareenos.
So to be clear what I mean is you don’t learn multi-disciplinary pain like and ACGME pain fellowship, you don’t learn a focus approach to spine like a NASS fellowship presumably and you don’t learn full MSK like a sports doctor. You learn a bunch a billable or cashable procedures but truly master nothing. I think it’s too niche and job opportunities afterwards my be challenging because they may not know what to do with you.(not good enough in pain or spine to join a pain practice, not good at sport or fracture care for ortho, how will you feed yourself while waiting for $1k prp and $10k stem to fall out the sky) the’ll probably give you a job when you have no prospects afterward since they probably have the demand
 

lobelsteve

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So to be clear what I mean is you don’t learn multi-disciplinary pain like and ACGME pain fellowship, you don’t learn a focus approach to spine like a NASS fellowship presumably and you don’t learn full MSK like a sports doctor. You learn a bunch a billable or cashable procedures but truly master nothing. I think it’s too niche and job opportunities afterwards my be challenging because they may not know what to do with you.(not good enough in pain or spine to join a pain practice, not good at sport or fracture care for ortho, how will you feed yourself while waiting for $1k prp and $10k stem to fall out the sky) the’ll probably give you a job when you have no prospects afterward since they probably have the demand
They prefer folks who already did spine/pain fellowships. Human experimentation for profits.
 
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oreosandsake

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So to be clear what I mean is you don’t learn multi-disciplinary pain like and ACGME pain fellowship, you don’t learn a focus approach to spine like a NASS fellowship presumably and you don’t learn full MSK like a sports doctor. You learn a bunch a billable or cashable procedures but truly master nothing. I think it’s too niche and job opportunities afterwards my be challenging because they may not know what to do with you.(not good enough in pain or spine to join a pain practice, not good at sport or fracture care for ortho, how will you feed yourself while waiting for $1k prp and $10k stem to fall out the sky) the’ll probably give you a job when you have no prospects afterward since they probably have the demand


this is an incredibly high interest area for those interested in pain/spine/msk since it is where they intersect with anabolic options. I don't know all of them personally, but they are a high skilled and intelligent cohort. not learning a focused approach to spine? Have you ever met Gerry Malanga?

to say that finishing one of these fellowships would not make you "good enough in pain, or spine" is laughable. the job market is out there.
 
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Sounds like a great way to get cheap labor I feel like 20yrs ago this would have been part of an associate track and now they are capitalizing on the desire for validation without a meaningful certification.

How much regen should be taught in ACGME residencies and fellowship? Most academic centers are not leading in this area...
 
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this is an incredibly high interest area for those interested in pain/spine/msk since it is where they intersect with anabolic options. I don't know all of them personally, but they are a high skilled and intelligent cohort. not learning a focused approach to spine? Have you ever met Gerry Malanga?

to say that finishing one of these fellowships would not make you "good enough in pain, or spine" is laughable. the job market is out there.

 
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Bostonspine

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this is an incredibly high interest area for those interested in pain/spine/msk since it is where they intersect with anabolic options. I don't know all of them personally, but they are a high skilled and intelligent cohort. not learning a focused approach to spine? Have you ever met Gerry Malanga?

to say that finishing one of these fellowships would not make you "good enough in pain, or spine" is laughable. the job market is out there.
Forgive my bias I did a PMR residency at NYU and had may co-residents go to these private practice sports/spine/regen fellowship in nyc/Nj where they work 6day a week perform IME and round in subacute rehabs for the money making machine while churning out papers in the name of education. I admit I am usually skeptical. Regen medicine is exciting but if you already have ultrasound and floro skills do you need a year. With the stated requirements and cash pay after 6week there making bank.
 
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oreosandsake

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If you’ve already done fellowship wouldn’t a weekend course be sufficient?

if you had 1 on 1 training with someone maybe a weekend could give you a really good boost. but like previously mentioned, not all fellowships are equal.
 
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oreosandsake

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Forgive my bias I did a PMR residency at NYU and had may co-residents go to these private practice sports/spine/regen fellowship in nyc/Nj where they work 6day a week perform IME and round in subacute rehabs for the money making machine while churning out papers in the name of education. I admit I am usually skeptical. Regen medicine is exciting but if you already have ultrasound and floro skills do you need a year. With the stated requirements and cash pay after 6week there making bank.

this is what apprenticeship is supposed to be about. now that you're an attending, do you think you work less hard than you did when you were a resident? looking back, how much did your attendings shield from you so that you didn't have to deal with the bs parts of medicine and how much do you think it slowed them down to teach you how to do something as opposed to banging out 3 during the same time?

Yeah, I get it. you do make some money for the machine doing the less than glamorous parts of the job. (all worthwhile money making skills) but do those fellows get to stand next to the fountain of knowledge and glean pearls and have someone hold their hand while they screw up their 20th epidural? hopefully. Malanga is an incredible educator. Foye as well.

I can tell you, if life circumstances made sense, I would love to learn from these guys as well.
 
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this is what apprenticeship is supposed to be about. now that you're an attending, do you think you work less hard than you did when you were a resident? looking back, how much did your attendings shield from you so that you didn't have to deal with the bs parts of medicine and how much do you think it slowed them down to teach you how to do something as opposed to banging out 3 during the same time?

Yeah, I get it. you do make some money for the machine doing the less than glamorous parts of the job. (all worthwhile money making skills) but do those fellows get to stand next to the fountain of knowledge and glean pearls and have someone hold their hand while they screw up their 20th epidural? hopefully. Malanga is an incredible educator. Foye as well.

I can tell you, if life circumstances made sense, I would love to learn from these guys as well.

You articulate values that are rare now.
 
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oreosandsake

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this is what apprenticeship is supposed to be about. now that you're an attending, do you think you work less hard than you did when you were a resident? looking back, how much did your attendings shield from you so that you didn't have to deal with the bs parts of medicine and how much do you think it slowed them down to teach you how to do something as opposed to banging out 3 during the same time?

Yeah, I get it. you do make some money for the machine doing the less than glamorous parts of the job. (all worthwhile money making skills) but do those fellows get to stand next to the fountain of knowledge and glean pearls and have someone hold their hand while they screw up their 20th epidural? hopefully. Malanga is an incredible educator. Foye as well.

I can tell you, if life circumstances made sense, I would love to learn from these guys as well.

if someone hires a midlevel, it's to save them from doing the parts of the job that don't need a physician, or are mundane. but that midlevel needs to break even and if you're lucky make some money on them. best case scenario they are ramped up in a very short period of time and you don't need to supervise them.

I have mentored and worked with dozens and dozens of residents and helped them with general life career goals or help them obtain their fellowships. I supervise residents and fellows now. it is a labor of love. when you see the old salty academic attending in the corner (Steve Lobel - JK) who tries hard to ignore the residents but can't help but engage with them, you understand why they stick around.

NYC/NJ is expensive HCOL area. these are privately funded fellowships, not paid for my CMS. overhead in many practices is well over 70%. in all likelihood, the fellows DO NOT make the practices as much money as trainees imagine. last note, medical writing is a tough skill. re-writing someone's paper who doesn't have the experience doing it is much tougher than actually sitting down and writing it well the first time.




 

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this might very well be a stepping stone to ACGME fellowship......tell Mayo and all the other universities doing regen med the same thing
 
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Ferrismonk

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I entertained these fellowships once upon a time, but then I realized they were basically just research machines. Now we definitely need better studies out there for Regen procedures, but that's not me. If you're ACGME/AOA fellowship trained, you don't need a full fellowship to learn Regen science/procedures.
 
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Bostonspine

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this is what apprenticeship is supposed to be about. now that you're an attending, do you think you work less hard than you did when you were a resident? looking back, how much did your attendings shield from you so that you didn't have to deal with the bs parts of medicine and how much do you think it slowed them down to teach you how to do something as opposed to banging out 3 during the same time?

Yeah, I get it. you do make some money for the machine doing the less than glamorous parts of the job. (all worthwhile money making skills) but do those fellows get to stand next to the fountain of knowledge and glean pearls and have someone hold their hand while they screw up their 20th epidural? hopefully. Malanga is an incredible educator. Foye as well.

I can tell you, if life circumstances made sense, I would love to learn from these guys as well.
Yeah I disagree bread and butter needle work isn’t that hard and I’m the PMR guy around here, maybe driving the stim or hammer the kyphosis or doing a perm. An ultrasound guided injection is just that the staff support will draw the blood and spin it. You may extract the bone marrow but Someone else will process it according to there protocol. Opportunity cost is to great when you can spend a weekend to learn their secret sauce after completing a Pain/spine fellowship. Hell there are chiros doing this stuff with dead cell and we want to create a “fellowship”. Tell me what fellowship did these guys do. None they just started doing it. We should promote life long learning and stop fellowshipizing everything. Next there gonna have a neuromodulation Fellowship for stims, DRG, and peripheral stims with perm implants and programming clinics
 
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Agast

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I think a one month regenerative medicine rotation built into fellowship would be ideal
 
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Ferrismonk

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Yeah I disagree bread and butter needle work isn’t that hard and I’m the PMR guy around here, maybe driving the stim or hammer the kyphosis or doing a perm. An ultrasound guided injection is just that the staff support will draw the blood and spin it. You may extract the bone marrow but Someone else will process it according to there protocol. Opportunity cost is to great when you can spend a weekend to learn their secret sauce after completing a Pain/spine fellowship. Hell there are chiros doing this stuff with dead cell and we want to create a “fellowship”. Tell me what fellowship did these guys do. None they just started doing it. We should promote life long learning and stop fellowshipizing everything. Next there gonna have a neuromodulation Fellowship for stims, DRG, and peripheral stims with perm implants and programming clinics
Then they'll require fellowship training and board certification for docs but allow midlevels ("Advanced Practice Providers" in my hospital) to do it without special training whatsoever.
 
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oreosandsake

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Yeah I disagree bread and butter needle work isn’t that hard and I’m the PMR guy around here, maybe driving the stim or hammer the kyphosis or doing a perm. An ultrasound guided injection is just that the staff support will draw the blood and spin it. You may extract the bone marrow but Someone else will process it according to there protocol. Opportunity cost is to great when you can spend a weekend to learn their secret sauce after completing a Pain/spine fellowship. Hell there are chiros doing this stuff with dead cell and we want to create a “fellowship”. Tell me what fellowship did these guys do. None they just started doing it. We should promote life long learning and stop fellowshipizing everything. Next there gonna have a neuromodulation Fellowship for stims, DRG, and peripheral stims with perm implants and programming clinics
There already is a Neuro mod fellowship at U of Minnesota. For someone who didn’t get enough volume as a fellow they might consider it.
 
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