• Please review the updated member agreement. Included is a new statement supporting the scientific method and evidence-based medicine. Claims or statements about disease processes should reference widely accepted scientific resources. Theoretical medical speculation is encouraged as part of the overall scientific process. However, unscientific statements that promote unfounded ideological positions or agendas may be removed.

Friday

TGIF
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2004
104
1
Washington, DC
Status
For those out there who did research work (RA's) after graduation before med school, how did you use it to your advantage in your applications?

In my case, I plan on sending out AMCAS real early (as soon as I realistically can) and because I haven't been with my current researcher for more than 3 months now, I don't think it would be realistic to expect an LOR from him, especially in the time-frame I'd want.

I know the question seems quite dumb because of course I need to mention it, but I'm just not sure if I should dedicate my AMCAS essay to the research (I didn't do research in college), write about it in my secondaries, or wait to discuss it in my interviews. I'll of course note the research under 'research experience' or whatever else on the forms...

comments/suggestion/testimonials/examples appreciated. Thanks.
 

jlee9531

J,A,S
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 25, 2002
5,470
8
CA
fantasysports.yahoo.com
Status
Attending Physician
i dont know if i would mention it in your personal statement since it doesnt seem like a significant part of why you want to enter medicine...

however you can put it down in your list of ECs you have done on your amcas and write your little one paragraph blurb about it...talking about what you are doing in it and if you are excited about it and why you decided to do research...

yes you should put that you are currently doing research...and if a secondary questions asks you to describe your research...then do it. but if its asking you for your most meaningful EC...your research prolly isnt the best idea to put down...since you just started.
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
42
Bay Area
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Friday said:
For those out there who did research work (RA's) after graduation before med school, how did you use it to your advantage in your applications?

In my case, I plan on sending out AMCAS real early (as soon as I realistically can) and because I haven't been with my current researcher for more than 3 months now, I don't think it would be realistic to expect an LOR from him, especially in the time-frame I'd want.

I know the question seems quite dumb because of course I need to mention it, but I'm just not sure if I should dedicate my AMCAS essay to the research (I didn't do research in college), write about it in my secondaries, or wait to discuss it in my interviews. I'll of course note the research under 'research experience' or whatever else on the forms...

comments/suggestion/testimonials/examples appreciated. Thanks.
I didn't do research until after I graduated. It wasn't insignificant or anything, but I refrained from elaborating too much on it in my personal statement because there is space in your EC's section to talk about it. Not to lessen your research accomplishments, but almost, everyone does reasearch and you probably wont get much good out of crafting your whole personal statment around your research experience, especially if you're not applying to MD/PhD programs. I think you could easily work in a line or two about your research, or just let them know you did it in your PS, but i think it would be a waste of an opportunity to not talk about something unique unto yourself. The PS is really a place to make yourself stand out and appear unique in a sea of similar research, ec's, and experiences.

Good luck.
 
About the Ads

CalBeE

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2003
2,062
1
Visit site
Status
I suggest having your research mentor writing a LOR for you. Usually a LOR like that will include info on the research project you worked on. Some schools also ask about your "scholarly activities" in secondaries; that will be where you can talk about your research.
 

duka

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 19, 2003
173
0
Visit site
Status
I was in a similar situaion, and I had my mentor send a LOR to schools that accepted additional info either just before or just after interviews. I think I got a better letter of recommendation out of him at that point because he knew me better, and it was considered at all the shcools who were still thinking about me.

CalBeE said:
I suggest having your research mentor writing a LOR for you. Usually a LOR like that will include info on the research project you worked on. Some schools also ask about your "scholarly activities" in secondaries; that will be where you can talk about your research.
 

lizzylu

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2003
111
1
SF
Visit site
Status
Resident [Any Field]
duka said:
I was in a similar situaion, and I had my mentor send a LOR to schools that accepted additional info either just before or just after interviews. I think I got a better letter of recommendation out of him at that point because he knew me better, and it was considered at all the shcools who were still thinking about me.
Duka had the right idea. Wait until your researcher knows some more about you so he/she can write a nice, thoughtful letter. There's nothing worse than a mediocre letter, then the committee asks "why would he send this?"
 

Friday

TGIF
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2004
104
1
Washington, DC
Status
Thanks for all the feedback. Ya, I think I'll wait til later on to get an LOR from him. In any case I already have LORs from my college science proffs to start my apps with.

I guess it also is kinda dumb to try and put alot about the research in my AMCAS (although it is tied to non-lab research I did in college). I guess it would be more prudent to save details, if I'm asked for them, at the interview stage. I guess I was putting some weight on the research because it is kind of clinical (working with patients) and I thought it could help me score interviews. I'll just put it in brief at the relevant portion though, as some of you suggested. Thanks.
 
About the Ads