speedwalker

don't @ me
2+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2017
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Pre-Medical
Trying to write my first resume ever to be a research assistant. Should I include volunteering, ECs, study abroad information? What about other languages I speak if I know it's the PI's first language? Or should it just be my education, GPA, courses with grades, and any scholarly stuff? I feel like my resume would be so empty with just that stuff since I never had a job or done research before.
Thanks
 
Jul 23, 2017
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Pre-Medical
If you have no research experiences you should highlight relevant coursework, and maybe provide details of any major lab projects. Long term volunteering might be good just to show you can be responsible and dependable if this is your first job.

I recommend focusing on a good cover letter. Show the PI you've read their papers and relate it back to your interests and coursework. Email the PI directly and ask if there is an opening, rather than intermediaries if you are able. I got 5 interviews that way. I got 0 applying to postings, which are sometimes a formality and not real jobs.

Don't bloat your resume too much. You want to show what you can do for them, not that you've had the more "well-rounded" experiences that medical schools are looking for. Study abroad and languages spoken aren't really relevant unless you're specifically doing clinical research with a certain population.
 
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boogiecousins94

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May 16, 2017
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I would argue that your references are just as important if not more important than the actual experience for these jobs. At least in my PIs case they called my two other PIs literally 5minutes after I got off the phone with them discussing the job. Just make sure whatever you write on your resume will be backed up my a reference check and that the PI that gets called speaks to your abilities well.

Edit: Sorry if I misinterpreted this, is this for a real paid job like post graduation or like during school year? I think those two warrant different types of info, but if it's for a lab during the year then I would definitely put relevant coursework and labs completed, major, probably volunteering to show your communication skills etc.
 
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speedwalker

speedwalker

don't @ me
2+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2017
198
250
CA
Status
Pre-Medical
I would argue that your references are just as important if not more important than the actual experience for these jobs. At least in my PIs case they called my two other PIs literally 5minutes after I got off the phone with them discussing the job. Just make sure whatever you write on your resume will be backed up my a reference check and that the PI that gets called speaks to your abilities well.

Edit: Sorry if I misinterpreted this, is this for a real paid job like post graduation or like during school year? I think those two warrant different types of info, but if it's for a lab during the year then I would definitely put relevant coursework and labs completed, major, probably volunteering to show your communication skills etc.
Yeah, just undergrad research tasks
 

MCATISEZ

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May 31, 2016
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Put whatever you have that highlights your qualification for the job/volunteer position. I agree you should write a cover letter. It might not be a lot, but early in your undergrad I don't think a PI would expect you to have a lot of experience. But they still like freshman/sophomores because they can stick around for longer than the upperclassmen with more experiences.
 
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Oct 1, 2017
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Contact PIs that don't have current openings, but ask if they might have openings in the near future. This shows initiative and it makes it easier to make a lasting impression because you are competing with no one. If you impress them enough and it turns out their lab will have an opening in the near future, it saves the PI the trouble of going through dozens of applications, so it's a win-win.
 
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DameJulie

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Apr 23, 2016
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When I applied, I included the following:

1. My education background (major, GPA, graduation date)
2. My skills (e.g. computer, bioassay, whatever lab technique you know)
3. Your previous lab experience / publication / poster / conferences
4. References (I think they're useful, as I would call them for my lab's new hires)
5. Any other experiences you want to include (some PIs only want research-related experience, but some like to see what else you have been doing too)

It's okay to have an empty resume when you just first started college. When you graduate, you will have that resume filled with achievements!
 
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