harrothere

Pre-Med Student
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Jul 5, 2007
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Boston
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Pre-Medical
I am wondering if anyone has found med schools that look kindly on applicants who are open about their interests in clinical practice AND research.

I'm currently working with a ton of MDs (not just MD/PhDs) who are practicing and doing research, 50/50, and I think that this path would be great for my interests!

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zpiff

10+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2007
451
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Attending Physician
The biggest determinant in the US News rankings (not the primary care ones) is science funding I think. So you can start your search there.

From that point, I'd go to school's websites and see if the curriculum and other aspect of the school suites you. There are many great medical schools with lots of great research but you might want to see if a school is particularly strong in the types of research that you are interested in.
 

DoctaJay

bone breaker
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Jan 23, 2005
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The medical schools are ranked by the amount of NIH funding they get, so any of the top 20 will suit, but realistically every medical school will be able to accomodate their students who have an interest in research. I don't go to a top 20 but a couple of my classmates have been doing serious work along with classes and some have even switched over to the MD/PhD program. So I say all this to say that every medical school will give you these opportunities. What you have to figure out is which medical school has PIs or physicians that are working on projects that you are actually interested in. Its pretty hard to figure that out as an applicant unless you know someone already at the institution.
 
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flip26

10+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2007
4,795
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Medical Student
The medical schools are ranked by the amount of NIH funding they get, so any of the top 20 will suit, but realistically every medical school will be able to accomodate their students who have an interest in research. I don't go to a top 20 but a couple of my classmates have been doing serious work along with classes and some have even switched over to the MD/PhD program. So I say all this to say that every medical school will give you these opportunities. What you have to figure out is which medical school has PIs or physicians that are working on projects that you are actually interested in. Its pretty hard to figure that out as an applicant unless you know someone already at the institution.
I agree here - research is being done in every med school.
 

Narmerguy

Moderator Emeritus
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Jul 14, 2007
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Most medical schools will be fine with a student interested in clinical research as well. Research is a significant portion of the medical field and you'll find that the vast majority of the schools will have research opportunities (of varying difficulty to get involved with and sustain) available to the students.
 

gopher22

10+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2008
151
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Medical Student
Schools with more research funding have more investigators and therefore more areas of research to choose from. The options are helpful if you do not know what you want to research. Otherwise you could pick schools based on the presence of your interested research. Beware though, that some laboratories will not take students who are not seeking a masters or PhD, so don't assume you can work with someone at a particular school.

Finally, Duke and UPenn have a year of independent study built into their curricula, during which you could do research.
 

CCLCMer

CCLCM Alum c/o 2011
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Jul 10, 2006
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CCLCM is a five year research MD program. Some of us are getting MD/MSs, which you take a few extra classes to do. Whether we get the research MD or the MD/MS, everyone is required to do a year of research plus two summers of research rotations as part of the standard curriculum. One of the research rotations is basic science and the other is clinical research. You can do either basic or clinical research for your research year. Research experience is also a pre-req for applying here. Some people did research during college, some took a year or two off between college and med school to do research, and some people came in with grad degrees, including a few with PhDs.

There are other schools that have research MD programs too, like Pitt, AECOM and Harvard. Duke has a four year program where you do your rotations second year and then third year you do research. But you don't have to go to one of these formal research MD programs. Probably all schools will give you the option of taking a fifth year for research or using some of your elective time to do research.
 
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