Oct 22, 2013
17
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi all,

My question is regarding doing research for medical school. I have some research experience in psychology as that was my previous major. I will be involved in scientific research. I am now pre-med

Can my research in psychology still help me for medical school?

I would greatly appreciate your input. Thank you for your time!

:)
 

Lya

5+ Year Member
May 13, 2013
1,231
290
NY
Status
Medical Student
Yes, it will help. Publications will help even more.
 
Jun 25, 2013
570
260
Status
Medical Student
It depends on the research I think...
Psychology research can be distributing surveys and interviewing people on the street...or it can be working in a lab studying addiction in mouse models.

Either way, research is good experience. At least psychology is related to medicine...=)
 

youmed

7+ Year Member
Jul 17, 2011
230
101
California
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi all,

My question is regarding doing research for medical school. I have some research experience in psychology as that was my previous major. I will be involved in scientific research. I am now pre-med

Can my research in psychology still help me for medical school?

I would greatly appreciate your input. Thank you for your time!

:)
Do the type of research that you enjoy. If you don't enjoy what you are researching, then you will have a miserable time.
 

sat0ri

Everything we see hides another
5+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2013
512
295
742 Evergreen Terrace
Status
Pre-Medical
Yes psych research certainly counts. I'm told that adcoms like diversity even in research experience (and in choosing majors--so psych is not a bad major). You're getting an understanding of the empirical method (which generally is the most the actually expect from undergrads in research), and even in ways that might be more relevant. It's very stats heavy, for one, which is likely to be far more than you might get out of harder sciences, and has parallels to biostats for instances, processing human data, etc. Psych is regarded as almost an illegitimate science, which I think is unfair and ignorant, but at the same time, I wouldn't want only psych research on my application, personally.

Again, it would depend on things like level of involvement, length of stay, if research was continued after you changed majors (leaving immediately after might reflect lack of value of your experience); the content would matter somewhat--neuroscience or behavioral psych would likely be seen better than animal psychology of turtles--but really, the difference between having research in even say botany and biomedical cancer research will be smaller than the difference between research in botany and no research at all. That is, the benefit of having more clinically-relevant research is modest compared to having research experience at all.

Hope that dead horse is thoroughly beaten :beat: