jumpman235023

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For those who have experience in submitting manuscripts and all that accompanies the process:

As a first year medical student submitting a paper for a research project for which all testing was completed at my undergrad institution, would I list 2 author affiliations? (i.e. one for the undergraduate lab I worked in and one for my current institution/med school) Or should I just do one or the other? Any help from someone with experience in this would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

Amba

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For me, if all funding was provided by my PI at my undergrad institution and all other authors are members of that institution, I only list that affiliation. If it's a collaborative project between institutions, I obviously list both.

Posters are different - I always list both affiliations, even if all data/funding was from the undergrad institution.
 
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Only list the institution affiliation where the funding came from and the research was done. It doesn't matter that you moved on to a different institution, especially as a medical student.
 
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194342

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For those who have experience in submitting manuscripts and all that accompanies the process:

As a first year medical student submitting a paper for a research project for which all testing was completed at my undergrad institution, would I list 2 author affiliations? (i.e. one for the undergraduate lab I worked in and one for my current institution/med school) Or should I just do one or the other? Any help from someone with experience in this would be appreciated. Thanks!
If I were you I would list where you performed the work at, i.e. the undergrad institution. However, you can list whatever you want. I wouldn't do both but still up to you.
 
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235009

I'm confused by the responses here…

In assuming there is a more senior faculty member that is going to be on this manuscript who is still affiliated with the institution. You add your current institution and can have two attributions.
 
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Haven't had this happen yet personally but probably will in the near future. As I'm trying to think of papers I've read or reviewed, I think they typically list their current affiliation. I can think of some that were done by people in fellowship but ultimately submitted and published after they started their new faculty position. In all the cases I can think of, the former fellow listed their new institution as their affiliation. I think a couple of them may have listed both.
 
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The paper will usually have a line that reads, "Investigation performed at ________." Funding sources will also be listed separately.

Author affiliations can be listed however you like. I always list my current affiliation. Others list their affiliation at the time the work was performed. Sometimes this depends on whether your institution requires approval before you publish an article. But there is no hard and fast rule, at least in my specialty.
You're also a senior resident, if I recall correctly. Sure you can list whatever you like, and I could see where being an attending or resident you might want to list your current affiliation, but OP is a first year medical student. IMO it would just look a little strange and irrelevant. Also, anytime I've listed affiliations or seen them listed it's always by department or divison, "department of orthopedic surgery" "division of nephrology", etc. OP just listing X school of medicine would look odd. Like others have said, I don't think anyone would care, but I would also not call it the norm for medical students to do, especially for an undergrad project.
 
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Don't be confused, I'm certainly at the mercy of those above me same as you are. I have exactly as much autonomy as people bigger than me let me have.

That being said, I was trying to answer the question of "What is the norm?" And I think my answer largely stands that there is no norm. You can provide the affiliation that is most advantageous to you.

Now granted, if you have a senior author or PI who feels strongly about how you should be listed, fine, you go along withen it. But I have found that most of the time no one cares, so put down whatever works best for you.

Haha not trying to make it an autonomy thing, just pointing out that I've always viewed my list of affiliations as the people who employed me to do the research. Just think, during undergrad did you list two affiliations? One for department of biochemistry, and another for the college itself? Of course not. I view education and research as two different things. Once you have an employer (eg in residency) it makes sense to list both your affiliations because you are now "supported" by both the department you did the research with and your current job. Also, especially as an attending, when you switch institutions it would make sense for your new institution to get some credit for your work, as you are now supported by them. For medical school though, I just don't see it as making sense, which is the only reason I pointed out that you are a resident so your situation now is a little different from OPs. As you pointed out, this is just my opinion and not a hard and fast rule.

TL DR- OP it doesn't really matter. I would say just the one institution, but that's just my opinion. You could also ask your PI what they think.
 

jumpman235023

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This does get complicated.

For example, I submitted a paper a few months back in which one of the authors (an attending surgeon) had conducted the research while at our institution. However, at the time of submission, he had moved on. His affiliation was listed as his new institution, since that was the most advantageous to his career.

If you like, you can think about this in terms of "what is right." But you'll be the only one doing that.

Figure out what is best for you, and if no one above you shuts you down, then great, you win.
Finally got back to this thread after a long week of exams... Thanks for all the responses. I ended up going with the undergrad affiliation. I should have some projects that get published from work I do while in med school also, so it will look decent to have a longitudinal record of publications.
 
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