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Research relevance to desired speciality (Residency Applications)

Necr0sis713

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    I'm curious about how relevant my research experience has to be to my desired residency and fellowship. My goal is to do an IM residency and then a fellowship in Heme/Onc. I'm finding possible research opportunities in topics such as ALS and HIV research (molecular biology type research) but i'm kind of worried that I won't find any research in cancer or hematology.

    I know Step 1 scores matter most, but i'm just trying to set myself up for my desired match in the future. Any input will be appreciated.
     

    ERDOC555

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    Feb 13, 2016
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      I'm curious about how relevant my research experience has to be to my desired residency and fellowship. My goal is to do an IM residency and then a fellowship in Heme/Onc. I'm finding possible research opportunities in topics such as ALS and HIV research (molecular biology type research) but i'm kind of worried that I won't find any research in cancer or hematology.

      I know Step 1 scores matter most, but i'm just trying to set myself up for my desired match in the future. Any input will be appreciated.

      IM research is a lot more flexible than let's say derm or ortho research. IM is so broad and has so many subspecialties that a lot of research is "applicable". I would say go for research projects that somehow relate to IM/Subspecialty and then choose specific projects based on what has the highest likelihood of resulting in a publication, or what you'll have time to do. If you get into a good IM program I'm pretty sure your chance of Heme/Onc are great, especially if you do research during your residency.
       
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      LyMed

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      May 4, 2017
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        I've felted that primary care is more flexible with it's research. Also, your main goal is to get into an IM residency. Afterwards, you getting into Heme/onc fellowship depends on research and LOR during residency - which I feel will be much more focused then. Just do something productive during medical school.
         

        bachprotege

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        Mar 6, 2017
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          What if you decide to switch from IM to a "more specialized" specialty like optho, ortho, or ENT after your 2nd or 3rd year? As an entering M1 next week, I think I'll have a tendency to follow my previous research experiences because I already have a knowledge base and it would be easier to get started right away, but that may not be fruitful/relevant for other specialty applications. At least, it will show a drive, interest, and capability for research (assuming I publish well)...

          But, of course, it would be better to choose the specialty research earlier than later. However, that will be difficult for a youngling like me who still has little idea what to pursue. I guess earlier shadowing/networking can help alleviate this issue, or choosing a research topic that covers multiple specialty bases. Then, in residency interviews you can try to make it relevant and/or explain that your seemingly less relevant research interests were due to a late specialty switch. But, choosing a specialty is another issue, another thread...
           

          IslandStyle808

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            What if you decide to switch from IM to a "more specialized" specialty like optho, ortho, or ENT after your 2nd or 3rd year? As an entering M1 next week, I think I'll have a tendency to follow my previous research experiences because I already have a knowledge base and it would be easier to get started right away, but that may not be fruitful/relevant for other specialty applications. At least, it will show a drive, interest, and capability for research (assuming I publish well)...

            But, of course, it would be better to choose the specialty research earlier than later. However, that will be difficult for a youngling like me who still has little idea what to pursue. I guess earlier shadowing/networking can help alleviate this issue, or choosing a research topic that covers multiple specialty bases. Then, in residency interviews you can try to make it relevant and/or explain that your seemingly less relevant research interests were due to a late specialty switch. But, choosing a specialty is another issue, another thread...

            There are people who have published chart reviews during 3rd year for the field of their interest. So this can help if the research between MS1-MS2 wasn't in your intended field.
             

            Lya

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              IM research is a lot more flexible than let's say derm or ortho research. IM is so broad and has so many subspecialties that a lot of research is "applicable". I would say go for research projects that somehow relate to IM/Subspecialty and then choose specific projects based on what has the highest likelihood of resulting in a publication, or what you'll have time to do. If you get into a good IM program I'm pretty sure your chance of Heme/Onc are great, especially if you do research during your residency.

              This.

              What if you decide to switch from IM to a "more specialized" specialty like optho, ortho, or ENT after your 2nd or 3rd year? As an entering M1 next week, I think I'll have a tendency to follow my previous research experiences because I already have a knowledge base and it would be easier to get started right away, but that may not be fruitful/relevant for other specialty applications. At least, it will show a drive, interest, and capability for research (assuming I publish well)...

              But, of course, it would be better to choose the specialty research earlier than later. However, that will be difficult for a youngling like me who still has little idea what to pursue. I guess earlier shadowing/networking can help alleviate this issue, or choosing a research topic that covers multiple specialty bases. Then, in residency interviews you can try to make it relevant and/or explain that your seemingly less relevant research interests were due to a late specialty switch. But, choosing a specialty is another issue, another thread...

              You may also consider taking a research year after your 3rd year if you feel more research is needed. It's completely normal to feel like you have no idea as an entering M1, so feel free to explore early with open mind and ask residents/attendings about why they chose certain fields or how they narrowed down specialties of interest, etc. As you said, the earlier you find out about your specialty, the better it will be for you in the long run.
               
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              judb16

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                Related but slightly different question...I'm interested in multiple specialties and was worried about the idea of spreading my research too thin and trying to get involved in multiple areas. So I committed to doing research in the most competitive area I could see myself pursuing.

                My question is, lets say I decide to apply to a different residency than the one that all of my research is in. And the one I apply to is still competitive, but not as much as the one with all my research. Will that be a problem for me?
                 
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