Research

Discussion in 'Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties' started by ERJunkie, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. ERJunkie

    ERJunkie Member
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    I'm a MS1 and was recently offered the opportunity to do obestiy/cv disease research. However, I'm interested in an academic surgery residency at this time. I know it can't hurt, but does doing research make a difference on your application? If so, where does the research fall in the list of important credentials? I've heard differing opinions on this topic.
     
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  3. PatrickBateman

    PatrickBateman Senior Member
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    Yes it does. I don't know where it falls on their list, but they ALWAYS talk about it in the interview.
     
  4. redsurgeon

    redsurgeon year 4 medical student
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    I have done two projects so far, in years I and II. Neither was in surgery. My current "project" is getting through year III. Then, I am considering doing another short project in surgery, starting with an elective in surgery, and continuing through year IV. I don't know if this looks sort of thing looks scattered, like I am not "dedicated" to surgery, but I'm having fun.

    I think that I could probably take it easy, and not do the surgery project. That is, I think they care more that you did research or a project, not specifically what it was in. It shows outside interest, motivation, planning, and enthusiasm. It also gives you something to talk about in an interview.
     
  5. guavero

    guavero Member
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    While red's comment is true, I have encountered in my interviews that the surgeons are more interested in "clinical" research a little more than the basic science. Exceptions are for surgeons who actually do basic science research themselves.

    I have done some research in the basic science mainly with microbio focus. I also did some clinical (chart review type) research and found that most interviewers were more interested in the latter.

    While having publications helped me get interviews to some good academic surgery programs, I would strongly encourage that you concentrate all your efforts in doing as well as you can on your Step I. That and your surgery clerkship grade are the most important things (IMHO) programs look at to get an interview spot. Once you get an interview, then research could be the "icing on the cake" (pardon the cliche).

    Good luck on whatever you decide to do :)
     
  6. Skialta

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    I don't know exactly how much the specific research will help for residency apps (I am a third year), but I have to believe it is helpful. I have been doing clinical research in surgery since I was a first year. I have been to a few confrences and have had contact with numerous academic surgeons from programs across the country, and I will have multiple publications and will be speaking at a national confrence. I think the more people you know the better off you are, especially if they personally see your work, but who knows for sure, just my 2 cents

    Skialta
     
  7. fishmonger69

    fishmonger69 deadly with a knife
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    i've been told by quite a few attendings that 'medical student' research is the equivalent of the stuff we all do in undergrad to pad our resumes. unless you're getting published in Nature, they're not all that impressed on a research level. case reports are a dime a dozen as well since you can basically write one over the weekend, so just be wary of things like that. what they do like to see is students who are interested in performing research and demonstrate an ability to balance class time, lab time, etc.

    to echo Skialta, it's a lot about who you know. most applicants get interviews within their region because academia is a small world, and someone knows someone at your program. i've actually been quite amazed at the name-dropping that has occurred during my interviews. just try to get in with your PD/Chairman, ask advice, get good letters, and score well on step1 and your 3rd year clerkship.
     
  8. sandg

    sandg Senior Member
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    I am also an M1 and have been advised to concentrate on classes and Step 1 as guavero suggested. Does this boil down to doing research more or less only in the summer between the first and second years? Has anyone here been able to produce something worthwhile/tangible in just a summer (poster, publication, etc.). It seems like there would be a lot of logistical and time obstacles (not to mention lab politics) to overcome to accomplish this in 2-3 months.
    There have been divergent opinions so far in this thread...any other input is appreciated.


     
  9. Skialta

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    I focused on clinical research because it was something where I didn't have to have a set schedule for, you could work on it when you had the time. I think the summer after MS1 is a great time to get started. You can't really do much for step 1 at this point, most of step one is MS2 in my opinion.
     

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