• Set Yourself Up For Success Webinar

    October 6, 2021 at 2 PM Eastern/11 AM Pacific
    SDN and Osmosis are teaming up to help you get set up for success this school year! We'll be covering study tips, healthy habits, and meeting mentors.

    Register Now!

  • Funniest Story on the Job Contest Starts Now!

    Contest starts now and ends September 27th. Winner will receive a special user banner and $10 Amazon Gift card!

    JOIN NOW
  • Site Updates Coming Next Week

    Site updates are coming next week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Click the button below to learn more!

    LEARN MORE

Residencies care about undergrad research?

When you are applying for residency programs, are publications that you had when you are an undergraduate less important than ones you had during medical school? Do they even care what you did as an undergrad?

One other thing. The past two threads I've gotten some great responses. I really appreciate all those who contribute. I better step it up and start giving my two cents on more threads!
 

iduwanna

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 2, 2008
326
4
0
  1. Pre-Medical
When you are applying for residency programs, are publications that you had when you are an undergraduate less important than ones you had during medical school? Do they even care what you did as an undergrad?

One other thing. The past two threads I've gotten some great responses. I really appreciate all those who contribute. I better step it up and start giving my two cents on more threads!

I agree that you should step it up a bit with some advice, big C.

That said, UG research won't be ignored and considering your intensity, I'd place bets on you're matching into whatever you want.
 

SomeDoc

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2007
991
96
256
  1. Attending Physician
When you are applying for residency programs, are publications that you had when you are an undergraduate less important than ones you had during medical school? Do they even care what you did as an undergrad?

One other thing. The past two threads I've gotten some great responses. I really appreciate all those who contribute. I better step it up and start giving my two cents on more threads!


If published; absolutely. More recent publications hold more weight, so publications during medical school will be of more significance. Exceptions to the aforementioned include first authorship in undergrad publication(s), or publications in major journals as an undergrad.
 
About the Ads

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
221
  1. Attending Physician
If it got published it still counts. Also, a lot of these guys can't do math...they're in a hurry. If someone sees a paper published when you were a MS1, from stuff you did a year or two before med school, they won't necessarily know or care that it was stuff you did before med school. The medical relevance of the research matters too... i.e. was it endocrinology and now you are applying for internal medicine, or was it watching monkeys at the zoo and now you are applying for radiology?
 

Acherona

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 21, 2004
606
23
286
  1. Attending Physician
If it got published it still counts. Also, a lot of these guys can't do math...they're in a hurry. If someone sees a paper published when you were a MS1, from stuff you did a year or two before med school, they won't necessarily know or care that it was stuff you did before med school. The medical relevance of the research matters too... i.e. was it endocrinology and now you are applying for internal medicine, or was it watching monkeys at the zoo and now you are applying for radiology?

yea i've been asked about research I did back to freshman year of college (not published). They don't read the dates. I think they want to see if you can explain what you did, mainly. Also gives them something to talk about during the interview.
 

howelljolly

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 30, 2007
2,059
10
211
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I did research 8 years ago, and I did not publish...(the research has since been published without me) I can't discuss what I ate for lunch today, let alone what research I did 8 years ago. Should I not indicate having done this research on my ERAS?
 

dragonfly99

Full Member
10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
5,089
49
221
  1. Attending Physician
howelljolly,
You absolutely should be ready to discuss all research you have done in the past. Remember, you generally just have to know enough to basically explain what you did and have a 5 minute conversation about it. In my experience, research stuff was one of the main things I got asked about during interviews. If you don't remember your research at all, I'd get out any old abstracts, etc. that you wrote, and/or get the paper that was later published and reread it. Or you just have to get good at spouting some BS. Usually if it's not the interviewer's field of research, he/she doesn't really know about it anyway and as long as you say something that sounds reasonable they'll think you know what you are talking about.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 12 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.