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Residency for UK student

Discussion in 'General International Discussion' started by geezer, Mar 20, 2002.

  1. geezer

    geezer Member

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    Hi

    I'm a UK med student with an interest in obtaining a residency in the US. My preferred choices are:

    Neurosuegery
    General/Transplant surgery
    Gastroenterology/Hepatology
    Cardiology
    Neurology

    I'm not sure how the procedure works in the US but do I have any chance on getting into a residency programme in any of these specialties, or would I be better off staying in the UK.

    geezer
     
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  3. robin1

    robin1 Junior Member

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    The story with post-grad training in the US isn't quite as simple as "obtaining a residency." Some things to consider:

    --Most of the specialities you indicated as having an interest in do not even have direct residency programs. For example a cardiologist or transplant surgeon would first have to compltete a residency in Internal Medicine or General Surgery respectively followed by a fellowship in these specialist fields. The fellowships for these fields are extremely competitive to get into and would proabably require that you first completed an IM or GS residency at a university affiliated program, which is considerably more dificult to obtain (especially for a foreign grad) as compared to a community based program.

    --The qualifications you earn in the US may not be recognized at all should you have to return to the UK. Or you may have to take the Royal College exams for your field, which I understand are very difficult to pass for people who haven't trained under a UK-style system.

    --Although this wasn't much of a concern even at this time last year I would say that it may definitely be an uphill battle for anyone looking to enter the US right now who doesn't already have citizenship or permanent residence (i.e. green card holder). The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has very recently come under alot of fire for the way they simply gave out entry visa's to anyone who said they were in the US for training or educational purposes. After what happened this week when a 9-11 hijacker just had his visa renewed I would say a crackdown on immigration is imminent.

    All of this should be considered in addition to your having to take the USMLE I & II and CSA (and TOEFL) in order to even be eligible for residency.

    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">would I be better off staying in the UK</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Only you (and maybe the US government/INS) can decide that. Good luck whatever you decide. :)
     
  4. andy toth

    andy toth Member

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    i would give it a try. it's not as difficult as publicized. what stage are you in currently? as the woman above mentioned, you might have to do a generic residency prior to completing the speciality training.

    as long as you know the procedural system prior, you're cool. but you would be leaving behind the beauty of england behind for...america? :p

    there are five systems you should work with. (listed in holographic order)

    ECFMG -- the national proxy
    <a href="http://www.ecfmg.org" target="_blank">www.ecfmg.org</a>

    ACGME -- the definer
    <a href="http://www.acgme.org" target="_blank">www.acgme.org</a>

    FREIDA -- the database for public viewing <a href="http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2997.html" target="_blank">http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2997.html</a>

    ERAS -- the communication system
    <a href="http://www.myeras.aamc.org" target="_blank">http://www.myeras.aamc.org</a>

    NRMP -- the algorithm that 'does it'
    <a href="http://www.nrmp.org" target="_blank">www.nrmp.org</a>

    of course there is more (to it), but this is the backbone.

    Andy
     
  5. andy toth

    andy toth Member

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    re: immigration

    immigration = america
    <a href="http://www.dos.gov" target="_blank">http://www.dos.gov</a> = <a href="http://www.dos.gov" target="_blank">http://www.dos.gov</a>

    hijacker /= gastroenterologist

    there is not going to be a 'crackdown' on physicians. unless they are spy-gastroenterologists. but who would have time?
     
  6. andy toth

    andy toth Member

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    <a href="http://www.state.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.state.gov/</a> -
    <a href="http://www.state.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.state.gov/</a>
    -------------------------
    <a href="http://www.dos.gov" target="_blank">http://www.dos.gov</a>
     
  7. geezer

    geezer Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. I currently have 1 year left at med school and after that, I will spend another year in the UK to get fully registered with the UK General Medical Council.

    The reason for my interest in practising in the US is because it takes approximately 12 years training after graduating form med school before I can apply for consultant status. in the UK. Infact, consultant status is not guaranteed even if I complete the full training as the UK government tightly controls the number of consultants in each specialty. I am getting the impression that the same does not apply in the US and that all trained medics attain consultant status, plus the post graduation training is shorter.

    My concern however is that I do not want to go through the whole process of studying for the USMLE if I will be hindered in my specialty choice because of my IMG status.

    geezer
     
  8. LukeA

    LukeA Junior Member

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    I'm too thinking of doing a residency in the USA. I'm also in my final year - at UCL. I understand completely over your "12 years" comment. General Surgery in the US would take about 5 years if you include a fellowship - and then you're on good money.

    Neurosurgery is perhaps a little bit too competitive for us FMGs - even coming from a country highly rated for its medical education.

    I did a rotation at the Barrow in Neurosugery (one of the more highly sort after residencies)which comes highly recommended.

    If you want a green card, marry a nurse! That's what I'm doing (not just for the card) and it beats bothering with a J-1 visa (you HAVE to go home for 2 years).

    Please write if you want a chat.
     
  9. geezer

    geezer Member

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    Luke,

    Have you taken the USMLEs and if so, what's the best way to go about it as a UK student and how difficult would you say it is.

    You also mention your elective in neurosurgery at a competitive school in the US. How do I go about finding which schools are highly rated for the specialties that I'm interested in. The reason I ask is because I am particularly interested in persuing an academic career in the US.

    geezer
     
  10. vincentyim

    vincentyim Junior Member

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    British Medical education is excellent. The medical students are long in history, traditional.
     

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