Retirement rank

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by dtrainer, May 9, 2008.

  1. dtrainer

    dtrainer San Antonio bound!

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    I am curious as to how long an individual must hold a rank before one can retire at said rank? As I have mentioned before, I am contemplating the Navy's HSCP program. I have been trying to do a cost/benefit analysis to determine if it is worth it.

    If my understanding is correct I will only need to practice medicine for seven years in the Navy (beyond residency) to retire. My calculations are based on 20 years - 6 years active AF - 4 years HSCP - 3 years military residency (assuming a primary care specialty) = 7 years. Does this sound right?

    I am wondering if in those 10 years of commissioned services it is possible to achieve the rank of CDR (O-5). I believe I can be given time in grade credit for my MSPH. Even if I did make CDR in that time period would I be able to retire at that rank?
     
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  3. 73BARMYPgsp

    73BARMYPgsp Post Doc

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    Not sure if it's the same for Navy, but Army is 2 years at the highest grade earned.
     
  4. dentalOH

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    Retirement pay is based off the average basic pay of the highest 36 months of your career and is the same for all services. At 15 years, you must choose between the High-3 or the CSB/REDUX retirement systems. Descriptions of these systems can be found at:

    http://www.defenselink.mil/militarypay/retirement/ad/index.html
     
  5. 73BARMYPgsp

    73BARMYPgsp Post Doc

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    Ahh, so its 3, not 2. My mistake.
     
  6. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky

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    What is HSCP? Do you mean HPSP? If so, your math is wrong I think. HPSP years are tacked onto the end, once you've already gotten 20 years on active duty.

    So, assuming your training isn't interrupted, you'd have 6 years active + 3 years in residency + 11 years practicing to get your 20. At that point, the 4 years of HPSP are tacked onto the end to give you 24 years. Confused yet?

    You said 6 years active duty; is that as an officer? If so, and if the Navy is like the Army, then you'll get 1/2 time credit for those years as a non-MD officer. That gives you 3 years toward O-4 as soon as you start residency. If you got your MPH on your own without military aid, then they might give you an extra year toward promotion. I understand that process is now being more closely scrutinized.

    If I'm right, then the best case scenario is that you'll pin on O-4 at the end of your PGY-2 year. That gives you 12 more years to gain toward rank before you'd be eligible for retirement. You should make O-5 halfway through that, and you'll probably make O-6 5 years later (with 1 year left before 20). That means, you'll retire as an O-6 with O-5's retirement pay. You'd have to stay 22 years to retire with O-6 pay.

    Somebody check my math.
     
  7. dtrainer

    dtrainer San Antonio bound!

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    HSCP is a unique Navy program. You are considered an active duty E-6 or E-7 while in medical school and the time counts toward retirement.
     
  8. dtrainer

    dtrainer San Antonio bound!

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    It was opened up for medical school this year. I guess the HPSP was such a poor deal for those of us that attend state school that they decided to open up the HSCP program for medical school. It is great for prior service.
     
  9. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky

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    I see. Am I right in assuming that this program would not be available to people who have previously held a commission as an officer?

    If so, then you'd be starting internship as an O-3 without any time in rank. I think that means you'd be 2 years shy of making O-5 if you retire at 20. And I think you'd have to stay 25 years to retire with O-5 pay.
     
  10. dtrainer

    dtrainer San Antonio bound!

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    Actually, it is open to those that have held a commission as well but in my case I was enlisted. So what are the promotion points for various ranks? 0-4 = O-3 + 6 years; O-5 = O-4 + 6 years? My masters program was two years so my understanding is that you can get up to two years contrustive credit for masters degrees in such areas as public health.
     
  11. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky

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    Correct. For most people it takes 6 years to pin on O-4 and O-5. If you're a stud, then you could be promoted above the zone. Although, I wouldn't count on it.

    Again, my understanding is that there has been a recent revisiting of additional degrees and how they apply to your military job. I hear that it is no longer automatic that a physician with an MPH will get credit toward rank for that master's degree.
     
  12. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member

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    Going on the premise your prior service is enlisted and not commissioned. No, it is not likely you will make CDR prior to the 10 years. Standard time to Commander is 12.
     
  13. a1qwerty55

    a1qwerty55 Attending

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    Small correction -

    Above the zone is bad - it means you have been passed over when in the zone of promotion.

    Ideally you'd like to get promoted Below The Zone (one year early). Frankly impossible to control as it usually goes to only 2-3 doctors/yr, and they in my estimation aren't stars but are in the right place at the right time.
     

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