DrBowtie

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So I'm trying to wrap my head around this topic and I was wondering if there were any resources that ranked or had sortable RVUs?

Also has anyone done any analysis on what procedure gives you the most RVUs per average time spent doing procedure?
 

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There's no "time" component to RVUs. Time and other factors are accounted for in the work portion of the RVU.

I haven't seen any published lists of procedures sorted by work RVUs, but I'm sure people have done this for their own use.

You can print out a list of RVUs for Medicare here: http://www.cms.gov/PhysicianFeeSched/PFSRVF/

I should also add that in figuring out time-per-procedure, you need to look at cycle time (which takes into account preparation, documentation, room turnover, etc.) rather than simply procedure time. In other words, you may be able to do a colonoscopy in 15 min., but that doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be able to do four of them every hour. It depends on how efficiently you and your staff can move from one to another, and complete all of the associated work.
 
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DrBowtie

DrBowtie

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Thanks for the link. I know that time isn't accounted for in the RVU, but as you said procedures have average lengths that can be used for comparison.

This topic is largely avoided at the medical school level, and I'm trying to understand how docs in my chosen specialty get paid in relation to other fields.
 

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I'm trying to understand how docs in my chosen specialty get paid in relation to other fields.
Not everyone is paid by RVUs, FWIW. RVUs ultimately determine reimbursement for a given CPT code or E&M service, but most people who have their paychecks calculated in this fashion are employed by health systems. The payment schemes are usually pretty inscrutable, which can work to the employer's advantage.

Physicians in private practice typically prefer to be reimbursed based on collections ("eat what you kill"), as it's much more transparent.