salary?

Discussion in 'Physician Scientists' started by shiraz, Nov 4, 2002.

  1. shiraz

    shiraz Junior Member

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    Hi there everyone,
    Does anyone have any idea how much a MD,PhD makes once he graduates with both of his degrees?
    IS it even close to a Physician or is it like any other professor? some figure will definitely help.
    thank you
     
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  3. MeganRose

    MeganRose Senior Member

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    The PI that I work for (MD,PhD) makes $130k. He is also 10% on a few other projects so he probably makes anywhere from 130-150k. Hope that helps,
    M
     
  4. Simon

    Simon Member

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    Here's something I never understood. What about if the professor supports himself completely from grants? In this case, does he just set the salary to whatever he wants....?

    For example, if he has a 1 million dollar grant from Howard Hughes, can he set his salary to $500,000 and use the remaning money for research (primarily grad student and postdoc salary from what I understand)?

    ~Simon
     
  5. MeganRose

    MeganRose Senior Member

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    I review account stuff and for NIH money the way it goes down is this: All the money is divided into different areas; equipment, salary, participant compensation, etc. In the grant proposal, all requested salaries are clearly specified (ie., Pi-100k, Clinic Coordinator 30k, Research Assist- 25k, etc) Theoretically, I suppose the PI could give himself as much of the salary allotment as he wanted to, but then again paying a research associate $10,000 a year bc the PI wanted a $500k salary might not be such a good idea...
     
  6. whodenie

    whodenie Member

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    Actually, the way that PI salary relates to grants is based on percent effort. For example, if a PI has two NIH RO1s then she likely is at 30-40% effort on each grant. This means that the corresponding percent of her salary comes from that specific grant. The total pay she can earn is, however, controlled by the institution that employs her. That said, the way that universities get money from grants ( ~30%) means that PIs who generate lots of money in the form of grants are more likely to receive higher salary offers. Particularly, since the school won?t have to pay most of the salary. Also tenure promotions tend to be tied to a track record of funding.
     
  7. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    This depends what department your work for. If you're employed in a clinical department and see patients, then your salary is comparable to the clinicians in the department. On the other hand, if you're purely basic science, then your salary is dictated by how much professors get paid by the department.

    We have a MD-PhD in our department who has clinics 1 day per week. He spends the rest of the week in the lab. His salary is close to $200K. He's a full professor in the deparment however.
     
  8. qdefiant

    qdefiant Member

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    how do you find out a salary of somebody?
     
  9. Andrew_Doan

    Andrew_Doan Doc, Author, Entrepreneur
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    Being a state medical school, all salaries are published. Take a look at this site:

    http://www.presscitizen.com/salaries2002/uiindex.htm

    This site has the salaries of ALL state, city, and University employees.

    The link above is the list of all University of Iowa employees including faculty and physicians.
     
  10. jot

    jot

    the NIH salary cap for md/phds is about 152k. this means that you can only pay yourself that amount from your grants and no more. it is possible to supplement your income from other sources like clinical work, bartending, or consulting.
    -jot
     
  11. shiraz

    shiraz Junior Member

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    Thank you all for all these responses.
    But I was wondering if all these salaries that you have mentioned like 130k or the guy who makes 200k are the starting salaries? If not what can you expect to make once you have completed your MD. PhD. I mean the starting pay?
    thank you
     
  12. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    2002 Fiscal year limits are $166,700. However, this doesn't mean that $166,700 is the maximum you can earn - it really depends on your set-up. Or to
    put it in NIH terms:

    " An individual's base salary, per se, is NOT constrained by the legislative provision for a limitation of salary. The rate limitation simply limits the amount that may be awarded and charged to NIH grants and contracts. An institution may supplement an individual's salary with non-federal funds."

    For example if you are a faculty member at an educational institution then you will (probably) have a 9-month 'protected' income, or 'institutional base income'. You are then allowed to raise additional salary for the remaining 3 months out of grant money eg NIH funds. Now, how much you get from NIH depends on how much your 'institutional base income' is. If your 9-month income adjusted to 12 months is *less* than $166,700/year you can only claim that same, lower rate for the remaining 3 months from the NIH grant (at whatever % effort of time you state - 100% of time for 3 months, or 25% of time for one month or whatever). If your 12-month adjusted income is say $250,000 then you can claim up to $166,700/12 per month from NIH. ie you still earn more than $166,700 per year but their cap prevent you from drawing more than this pro-rated per summer month.

    There is a further 'out'. That is you can adjust your 12 -month calculation to maximize the NIH funding if you have non-NIH funding. Then you draw whatever salary from your other grants to bring your salary up to $166,700/12 per month.

    The other 'out' is that the NIH salary cap does *not* apply to consultant fees under NIH research ie it is more profitable to consult under someone elses grant and let them consult under yours, than to work on your own grants! Some small amount of this mutual back-scratching occurs, but obviously it can't be excessive or NIH would clamp down and insist you make it a sub-contract (in which case nothing in gained as the cap does apply to subcontracts). Consultant fees are must still meet the test of reasonableness, as applied by NIH peer review.

    Is this clear? I've been playing these silly grant-salary games for a few years now and there are almost always "ways and means"...but I think you may be worrying about it a little too early! ;)
     
  13. Sonya

    Sonya Senior Member

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    are you a prof or something???:confused: I was under the impression you were, like a high school student...

    Anyway, in general, i'd think in academics, you'd get around 30% less than academics. but, i don't have real numbers. darn. that U Iowa Site lets you be very nosey
     
  14. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    No, I'm neither. I am a non-trad who works in research (since leaving college). I read MSTP therefore because you guys are also interested in research, but I am just applying to MD programs.

    High school?? :laugh: lord no...
     

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