jmm03m

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Hey everyone!! I was just wondering if anyone who has interviewed at Samford has been asked whether or not they would be comfortable dispensing the morning after pill??

I am lost on how to answer this question. I mean I know how I feel about the pill but since Samford is a Christian-based school I question whether my answer would not be conservative enough for them. Please let me know what you think!! Thanks!
 

eddavatar

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Just one thought, is making admission decision based on religious belief legal?

But technically Plan B does not cause abortion. It's the same as every other birth control pill except that it works "after the fact"
 

fmbzp5

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Just one thought, is making admission decision based on religious belief legal?

But technically Plan B does not cause abortion. It's the same as every other birth control pill except that it works "after the fact"


Even though I agree that not allowing implantation isn't an abortion, I doubt that people against it would change their mind based on the technicalities.

My response to the question is very simple. Having not received training on how the drug works, exactly what people are given it for and not having been placed in that situation, I do not feel that I can give an honest opinion on what my reaction would be.

you can't argue with that. It is no different than any other situation where a person may feel one way but the complete opposite if placed in that position. For example think of the numbers of people that go into the military train feel confident to go into battle and then a certain percentage will always freeze up and not shoot back.
 
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sdn1977

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That question now is only relevant for those who are under 18.

For the over 18 crowd - its now OTC & is not "dispensed" - rather it is sold & can be sold by anyone in the pharmacy - doesn't have to be a pharmacist.

For the under 18 crowd - the case law defines pretty clearly what you can & cannot do.
 

Slntwolf

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I recently did a speech regarding Plan B and had to do some research on it. Basically, it's main mechanism of action is that it inhibits the LH surge responsible for ovulation just like any other birth control pill. It's secondary mechanisms are that it increases cervical mucus viscosity which would inhibit sperm migration and also alters the lining of the endometrium of the uterus to inhibit implantation. The controversy is whether it's abortion or not? Medically, they don't consider the fetus a viable life form until implantation and you won't be considered pregnant until then, but the other side of the coin is life begins at fertilization which occurs in the fallopian tubes long before implantation in the uterus. People keep comparing this to RU-486 which in fact will cause the shedding of the lining of the uterus along with any implanted fetus up to 3 months I think. Plan B won't cause this and is only an option for up to 72 hours after the act.

I was never asked this in my interview, but I had an answer already prepared. I was just going to say that as a pharmacist I don't believe that is the forum for me to express my personal and moral beliefs on people I'm supposed to be helping. We're supposed to remain objective. Anyways, not really sure how a christian-based school would take that answer.
 

Caverject

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Hey everyone!! I was just wondering if anyone who has interviewed at Samford has been asked whether or not they would be comfortable dispensing the morning after pill??

I am lost on how to answer this question. I mean I know how I feel about the pill but since Samford is a Christian-based school I question whether my answer would not be conservative enough for them. Please let me know what you think!! Thanks!
They are just looking for some logic in your answer. I doubt it was a trick question to weed out the "baby killers" If your cool with dispensing it, then why? If your not cool with dispensing it, then why?
 

Farmercyst

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Originally Posted by eddavatar
Just one thought, is making admission decision based on religious belief legal?



The refusal to sell/dispense based on moral grounds can be religiously motivated (abortion type issues). It doesn't have to be, but can be. If California doctors can refuse to give a lethal injection on moral grounds, I find it hard to believe you could get yourself in trouble for refusing to sell/dispense on moral grounds (besides all you'd have to do is have the tech standing next to you dispense, or the pharmacist on your right if there are multiple pharmacists on the same shift). Of course having said that, I seem to recall reading that judges in MA were not allowed to deny marriage to homosexual couples on "moral" grounds. I think that had to do with the lack of ability for couples to go to multiple JPs for that service vs pharmacy/medical profession where within a square mile there are countless people that could sell Plan B.
 

pharmacology

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Even though I agree that not allowing implantation isn't an abortion, I doubt that people against it would change their mind based on the technicalities.

My response to the question is very simple. Having not received training on how the drug works, exactly what people are given it for and not having been placed in that situation, I do not feel that I can give an honest opinion on what my reaction would be.

you can't argue with that. It is no different than any other situation where a person may feel one way but the complete opposite if placed in that position. For example think of the numbers of people that go into the military train feel confident to go into battle and then a certain percentage will always freeze up and not shoot back.

[you can't argue with that.] - I can and I will: So you want to be a pharmacists yet you seem to have no interest in learning about some of the latests medications or areas that concern pharmacists nationally. I'm sure there are many, many other interviewees that have at least attempted to kept up with what is current as it relates to pharmacy, the direction of pharmacy, the role of a pharmacist, and controversial medications.

So tell me...who would you want to enroll? Someone who seemed not too interested in learning about the field they've chosen as a career or the person who has gone out of their way to learn about pharmacy and current events in the field of pharmacy?

Now if you have shown in other areas of the interview that you have knowledge of the field and an interest that is one thing. I would just hope your "I do not feel that I can give an honest opinion..." answer wasn't the first thing you said. To me that would be a turn off.
 

Zeke1955

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[you can't argue with that.] - I can and I will: So you want to be a pharmacists yet you seem to have no interest in learning about some of the latests medications or areas that concern pharmacists nationally. I'm sure there are many, many other interviewees that have at least attempted to kept up with what is current as it relates to pharmacy, the direction of pharmacy, the role of a pharmacist, and controversial medications.

So tell me...who would you want to enroll? Someone who seemed not too interested in learning about the field they've chosen as a career or the person who has gone out of their way to learn about pharmacy and current events in the field of pharmacy?

Now if you have shown in other areas of the interview that you have knowledge of the field and an interest that is one thing. I would just hope your "I do not feel that I can give an honest opinion..." answer wasn't the first thing you said. To me that would be a turn off.

That's exactly what I've thought as well. When I was asked this question my response was something along the lines of:

"This is something that has come up in my community (which it had) recently. I'm not 100% certain of how this issue is looked upon in civil and criminal law at the state or federal levels, so I can't comment on the legal perspective. However, when it comes to denying the Plan B drug based on religious beliefs it's important to remember that while all religions are founded on a basis of morals and ethics that are incredibly important to any profession, religious beliefs that conflict with a professional's day-to-day practice have no place in the working environment. Religious beliefs aside, I don't feel that I would have the ethical right to question someone's procurement of the drug because the patient could have been sexually assaulted and I would certainly have no right to question her motives nor to deny dispersal of the drug."

That's what I said since I had heard many conflicting reports on the legality of all of it.
 

KellyBean

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That's exactly what I've thought as well. When I was asked this question my response was something along the lines of:

"This is something that has come up in my community (which it had) recently. I'm not 100% certain of how this issue is looked upon in civil and criminal law at the state or federal levels, so I can't comment on the legal perspective. However, when it comes to denying the Plan B drug based on religious beliefs it's important to remember that while all religions are founded on a basis of morals and ethics that are incredibly important to any profession, religious beliefs that conflict with a professional's day-to-day practice have no place in the working environment. Religious beliefs aside, I don't feel that I would have the ethical right to question someone's procurement of the drug because the patient could have been sexually assaulted and I would certainly have no right to question her motives nor to deny dispersal of the drug."

That's what I said since I had heard many conflicting reports on the legality of all of it.

Very good answer!! :thumbup:
 

pharmhopeful

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That's exactly what I've thought as well. When I was asked this question my response was something along the lines of:

"This is something that has come up in my community (which it had) recently. I'm not 100% certain of how this issue is looked upon in civil and criminal law at the state or federal levels, so I can't comment on the legal perspective. However, when it comes to denying the Plan B drug based on religious beliefs it's important to remember that while all religions are founded on a basis of morals and ethics that are incredibly important to any profession, religious beliefs that conflict with a professional's day-to-day practice have no place in the working environment. Religious beliefs aside, I don't feel that I would have the ethical right to question someone's procurement of the drug because the patient could have been sexually assaulted and I would certainly have no right to question her motives nor to deny dispersal of the drug."

That's what I said since I had heard many conflicting reports on the legality of all of it.

That is an incredibly eloquent response. I honestly don't think you could have handled that in a better way. :) A+++++
 

Zeke1955

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I thought it was the best I could do since I don't have official community pharmacy experience. Hopefully it was a good enough response for my interviewer!
 

aboveliquidice

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I thought it was the best I could do since I don't have official community pharmacy experience. Hopefully it was a good enough response for my interviewer!

Touching on the aspect of being a "professional" and the separation of "religious beliefs" from the "working environment" are the keys to that response. As a professional in the medical field, you simply cannot allow your personal viewpoints overstep your professional responsibilities. Our practices are spelled out by law - thus are personal viewpoints are irrelevant (in truth) to the situation.

Even if we completely disagree with abortion (which I do) - I cannot, and will not refuse to provide Plan B if it is asked for, and the patient is over 18.

Good answer - I hope you get a great response to it soon...

~above~
 
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