J

jot

a lot of schools have scholarships for medical students or grants based on merit or need. for the most part you don't really apply to them they just give them to you, of may use them to sweeten a deal. i know pitt med gives out about 15 full scholarships a year, which is a pretty substantial number - to well qualified students. vanderbilt has scholarships for both need and merit. schools that recruit good students usually have some great scholarships. some "big name" schools also have deep pockets - others can comment but it seems like places like duke can help you out if needed.

-jot
 

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Even Ivy League schools, which don't give merit-based scholarships for undergrads, might give merit-based scholarships (in addition to need-based) to med students. I think Penn does?

-RA
 
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katem

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i, too, was wondering about scholarships.

tulane seems to have substantial amounts of money available - any idea what typical stats are for recipients (surely they are much higher than tulane's overall averages)? i've read also that GW, MCP/Drexel, and Wash U (although based on WU's averages, i can't even imagine what it takes to get a merit scholarship) have money for merit scholarships.

basically any info about competitiveness for scholarships, number available, and whether they are renewable would be greatly appreciated.

drexel has up to 6 (not sure of value)
 

secretstang19

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The pre-med advisor at my school says that, in order to be competitive for merit scholarships, you've got to have 36+ MCAT and be ranked in the top 10 or so in the class (around 420).

I've heard that the other thing that helps is having multiple acceptances. Top name schools (like Duke) that have a good bit of grant money to give out could honestly just pick someone at random from the entering class and justify giving them money - everyone who is accepted is qualified. They often use the money to lure students in who have been accepted at other places, too.

For example, a friend of mine graduated last year and was accepted to (among other places) Penn and Duke. He managed to play them off each other, with each school increasing their financial aid offers until finally Duke gave him a FULL SCHOLARSHIP. Sure, he was a super-talented applicant (3.9+GPA, 42 MCAT) but he probably wouldn't have gotten the aid that he did if he had not encouraged the schools to 'bid' for him.
 
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agent

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I guess what i was looking for is general scholarship criteria, i.e. students need a 4.0 and over 1000 hours of community service, but i guess all scholarships are different.

The only schools I will be applying to are Rush, Loyola, UIC, Pritzker..

edit>> nevermind. answered above while i was responding.
 

omores

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Originally posted by secretstang19
For example, a friend of mine graduated last year and was accepted to (among other places) Penn and Duke. He managed to play them off each other, with each school increasing their financial aid offers until finally Duke gave him a FULL SCHOLARSHIP. Sure, he was a super-talented applicant (3.9+GPA, 42 MCAT) but he probably wouldn't have gotten the aid that he did if he had not encouraged the schools to 'bid' for him.
Financial aid packages and merit scholarships come from two different departments. Although I've heard plenty of tales of people getting more need-based $$$ by pitting one school against another, talking a school into giving you a merit scholarship is a whole nother ballgame, since these decisions are made by the admissions committee, not the financial aid department.

I'd wager that your friend got the scholarship based on his credentials rather than the bidding war he set up -- even at Duke, a 42/3.9+ is pretty exceptional.
 

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Originally posted by secretstang19
I've heard that the other thing that helps is having multiple acceptances. Top name schools (like Duke) that have a good bit of grant money to give out could honestly just pick someone at random from the entering class and justify giving them money - everyone who is accepted is qualified. They often use the money to lure students in who have been accepted at other places, too.

For example, a friend of mine graduated last year and was accepted to (among other places) Penn and Duke. He managed to play them off each other, with each school increasing their financial aid offers until finally Duke gave him a FULL SCHOLARSHIP. Sure, he was a super-talented applicant (3.9+GPA, 42 MCAT) but he probably wouldn't have gotten the aid that he did if he had not encouraged the schools to 'bid' for him.
This is definitely a great idea. If one school offers you money, mention it to others. I've heard about this from law schools folks, where schools would match or surpass what other schools said (including a girl deciding between Harvard and some other Ivy school, and Harvard ended up giving her 2/3). Again, it can't hurt to ask. They're not going to reduce an award, but they might raise it.

-RA
 

kaos

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Originally posted by secretstang19
The pre-med advisor at my school says that, in order to be competitive for merit scholarships, you've got to have 36+ MCAT and be ranked in the top 10 or so in the class (around 420).

I've heard that the other thing that helps is having multiple acceptances. Top name schools (like Duke) that have a good bit of grant money to give out could honestly just pick someone at random from the entering class and justify giving them money - everyone who is accepted is qualified. They often use the money to lure students in who have been accepted at other places, too.

For example, a friend of mine graduated last year and was accepted to (among other places) Penn and Duke. He managed to play them off each other, with each school increasing their financial aid offers until finally Duke gave him a FULL SCHOLARSHIP. Sure, he was a super-talented applicant (3.9+GPA, 42 MCAT) but he probably wouldn't have gotten the aid that he did if he had not encouraged the schools to 'bid' for him.
Darn, I guess that means "nay" for me. :(
 

Blitzkrieg

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Stanford publishes that avg debt for their students is $66,000....they are in the most expensive place on earth..silicon valley....I hear that they are quite generous.
 
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