School Reputation & GPA

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by scooter31, Feb 19, 2002.

  1. scooter31

    scooter31 'Ello Guv'nah!

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    Quick question- I graduated from a UC (UCD to be exact), and compared to some top notch schools- Ivy's and Stanford for example- your grades are lower due to grade inflation at those other schools. How does this fare for UC applicants? Is there some kind of levelling of the field, so that a 3.0 from a UC will hold the same weight as a 3.3 from, say, Yale? I was just told this by someone, who said that UC applicants can squeak by with SLIGHTLY lower grades because of not having the inflated grade policy (whatever that entails). I'm confused, can anyone straighten me out on this?
     
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  3. Test Boy

    Test Boy Senior Member

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    IMO, a 3.3 from Yale probably carries more weight than a 3.3 from any of the UCs, including Berkeley. In fact, I think a 3.3 from yale carries more weight than a 3.5 from Berkeley if all other things are equal. Prestige of undergrad carries a lot of weight.
     
  4. Naraku

    Naraku Senior Member

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    Not... necessarily.

    I graduated from Cornell with a 3.3, and was told flat out by one of my interviewers that the Dean of Admissions of that school was interested solely in the numbers- that he preferred a 3.9 from a no-name state school to a 3.7 from an Ivy League school. (And as I had neither a 3.7 nor a 3.9... but I digress.) My interviewer diagreed and told me that he personally felt that some schools (like Cornell, which is one of the few Ivy League colleges to _not_ inflate grades :) ) should be weighted differently, but it wasn't his decision to make.

    Does this mean that all med schools feel this way? Of course not- I still get an occasional impressed look when I mention that I did my undergrad at Cornell. It's just something to keep in mind. In other words... don't worry about it. Besides, the UCs have good reputations even here on the East Coast- they're not exactly no-name state schools.

    Good luck!

    Paige

    Cornell University '00
    UMDNJ-SOM '04
     
  5. tnt3

    tnt3 Member

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    Hey!
    Cornell rules! yeah! :)
    I went to Cornell too. C/0 '01, Engineering.
    Cornell definitely does not inflate grades. i think i'm going to TUCOM this Fall.
     
  6. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    Sorry to break it to ya, but you're undergrad school doesn't matter all that much. I know a handful of docs that graduated from a local community college and then a local state school with around a 3.3 GPA. I know some current med students that have done the same. Some of them went on to private, liberal arts schools in addition to the public universities. These schools weren't anything to brag about. They weren't Harvard or Hopkins if you get my drift. Earning decent grades from whatever school you go to and doing well on the MCAT is the most important thing. Don't worry about your undergrad reputation. It's pointless to do so. You have other, more important things to worry about I'm sure. Peace
     
  7. scooter31

    scooter31 'Ello Guv'nah!

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    Hey guys- appreciate the feedback.... So I guess it really doesn't matter where I went, just as long as I got a 4.0...... unlucky for me :( anyhow, thanks for the info, best of luck to you all!!!!
     
  8. Ben01

    Ben01 Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Atlas:
    <strong>Sorry to break it to ya, but you're undergrad school doesn't matter all that much. I know a handful of docs that graduated from a local community college and then a local state school with around a 3.3 GPA. I know some current med students that have done the same. Some of them went on to private, liberal arts schools in addition to the public universities. These schools weren't anything to brag about. They weren't Harvard or Hopkins if you get my drift. Earning decent grades from whatever school you go to and doing well on the MCAT is the most important thing. Don't worry about your undergrad reputation. It's pointless to do so. You have other, more important things to worry about I'm sure. Peace</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Regardless of whether or not it matters for getting into medical school, going to a good school does matter in other (more significant) ways. I wouldn't trade my educational experience at Cornell for anything. I didn't always make great grades but I worked very hard, was taught and mentored by some of the best professors in the world, participated in an exchange of ideas with professors as well as fellow students that has opened my eyes,ears, and mind, and was just generally nurtured in a unique educational environment that is drastically different than the environment at most schools. My experience there will stay with me forever.

    ps. the reputation of your undergrad does play a much larger role in the med school admissions process than you suggest (or want to admit). Example: it comes down to a guy from University of South Carolina and a guy from Yale (same scores etc) - a majority of the time it's going to the Yalie.
     
  9. jhug

    jhug 1K Member

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    this is a very interesting thread---
    being one who went to a community college and then a state school (univ. of utah) i was never once asked about my undergraduate work!! I did have a pretty high gpa-- 3.7-3.8 and many could have said that is what so high because of where i went-- fortunately no one did :) I guess my two cents are that the school reputation can most likely only help you-- not necessarily hurt you. But that doesn't really answer the question posted-- so my answer would be that i don't think i'd bet my medical education on what you've been told. Good luck!!!
     
  10. jcschultz

    jcschultz Junior Member

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    There is a great deal of variability from school to school, yes some will be harder than others, but a student chooses a college that is the best fit for them, and for that reason alone, I think that numbers are level across the board.
     
  11. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    Sure, with identical numbers, the Yalie would get preference for the interview. But lets say, both students get an interview and the Yalie is all brains and can't communicate worth crap. The community college/state school guy razzles and dazzles them with his knowledge and charm. Who wins out now?
     
  12. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    Oh yeah...one more thing. DO schools could give a crap where you went to school. Check out UHS's admissions site. They have a listing of ALL of the undergraduate institutions that their students attended. You'll notice a TON of community colleges on that list. If you're interested in osteopathic medical school, don't worry so much about your undergrad school. They care more about you as a person rather than an alum of some fancy college.
     
  13. Ben01

    Ben01 Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Atlas:
    <strong>Oh yeah...one more thing. DO schools could give a crap where you went to school. Check out UHS's admissions site. They have a listing of ALL of the undergraduate institutions that their students attended. You'll notice a TON of community colleges on that list. If you're interested in osteopathic medical school, don't worry so much about your undergrad school. They care more about you as a person rather than an alum of some fancy college.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">I'm not "worried" about and I don't think that I'm smarter/better than anyone because of where I went to college. Obviously there are many very smart people who didn't go to Ivy/"top" colleges and got into med school. That being said I think you are fooling yourself if you think that med schools "could give a crap where you went to school". Regardless of what you want to think it does play a role (albeit probably a small one).
     
  14. Ben01

    Ben01 Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Atlas:
    <strong>Sure, with identical numbers, the Yalie would get preference for the interview. But lets say, both students get an interview and the Yalie is all brains and can't communicate worth crap. The community college/state school guy razzles and dazzles them with his knowledge and charm. Who wins out now?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">uh....of course. I never said it was the ONLY factor or even a really important one. I just said that it DOES play a role.
     
  15. Ben01

    Ben01 Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by jcschultz:
    <strong>There is a great deal of variability from school to school, yes some will be harder than others, but a student chooses a college that is the best fit for them, and for that reason alone, I think that numbers are level across the board.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">how is it possible that some schools will be harder and have better teachers and resources but because a student chooses a schools that's "the best fit for them" all the numbers are equal (!?!?). Sorry but I've lost you here.
     
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  17. careerchanger

    careerchanger Member

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    don't fool yourself -- the school(s) attended do matter and matter a lot.
     
  18. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    It's understandable that you wish to stand up for your school, but the fact of the matter is that not everyone has the opportunity to attend Yale or Cornell. Medical schools recognize this and that is why they emphasize enrolling a diverse class. I agree, that if you do well from a good school, that looks very very impressive. It's not the entire picture, however. I understand this. I merely was saying that schools "don't give a crap" to make a point. Schools also know that poor kids, like myself, can't afford to go to Yale or Cornell. We had to take a different route to medicine. Community colleges, although they don't have much of a reputation, are (in my opinion) tougher than they appear. My old CC was more difficult than my 4 year, private liberal arts school (which BTW is listed in USNEWS as a top college...for what its worth!). I felt the teachers at the CC were out to prove something. They wanted to weed out the slackers and make those who wanted it bad enough had to earn it on their own. Our success was entirely up to us. Either we swam or sank and I learned my [email protected]#t because of it. Listen, I'm glad you have such pride in your schools and I know you'll do well in life. I wasn't fooling myself about the fact that schools put CCs on the same level as four year schools. Every DO school I emailed about this has returned saying that they accept credits from a CC with just as much weight as those earned at a 4 year school. Sure, you may go to a really great university and pay a hefty price, but I'm sure you'll reap the benefits after you're done. I don't mind sticking up for my old stomping grounds...the CCs that is. I didn't have the opportunity to attend such fancy schools. Consider yourself lucky to be where you are (in addition to really smart). You'd agree with me when I say that undergrad schools don't matter much because if you've seen some of the success stories I've seen, you'd be a believer too. God bless.
     
  19. Naraku

    Naraku Senior Member

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    Atlas-

    While I certainly agree with the main thrust of your argument (as per my comment upthread), I just wanted to point out that there are plenty of "poor kids" at Ivy schools. I was one of them. Thanks to the the Nice People in Financial Aid, I graduated with no more debt than I would have from Rutgers (my state school).

    Does everyone end up with that kind of financial aid package? Nope. My family had to essentially
    "haggle" with Financial Aid to get them to raise my grants. I thought that it was worth it, and I wouldn't trade my experience for anything (although I wouldn't mind getting rid of the loans). Other people feel differently, and that's all right, too. No matter where you go, you're the one who makes sure that you learn what you need to... no college (not even Cornell, as much I as love it) will do that for you. Med schools know that. That's why they have the MCAT. :)

    tnt3-

    Congrats on your acceptance! Just be warned- med school is possibly the only thing that can make Cornell Engineering look _easy_. :)

    Bests,
    Paige (Arts - biology '00, and _really_ missing DP Dough calzones right now)

    Cornell University '00
    UMDNJ-SOM '04
     
  20. Atlas

    Atlas Senior Member

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    Naraku,

    We are on the same page.
     

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