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Scottish residency as an American DO student?

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evaduarte3

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Hi all,

I know some threads have addressed some of these topics, but I don't think there are any that address how American, DO students fare in the residency pool for the UK (particularly for emergency medicine).

I am interested in doing my residency in Scotland and it seems like they are really trying to recruit for international applicants if they qualify. Despite the million times I've reviewed their website, I still don't get it: can someone dumb down the residency application process (with respect to an American residency system) and which years correspond to which training?

Perhaps most importantly, how do DO applicants compare to their MD counterparts on the international scene for residency positions (or are DO applicants even allowed to apply?).

Thank you in advance! I received the following info from the national recruitment website after I inquired about a Scottish residency (which just redirected me to the same websites and left me just as confused) in case you are interested:

"Dear Doctor,

Thank you for your interest in medical training in Scotland.

All information regarding applying to specialty training programmes can be found on the Scottish Medical Training websitehttp://www.scotmt.scot.nhs.uk/

This includes the person specifications which specify the essential requirements for applying for posts and the timeline for when posts are advertised/applications open etc. It also shows the number of vacancies that are in Scotland.

Programme descriptors and clinical contacts can be found at the following link http://www.scotmt.scot.nhs.uk/specialty/specialty-programmes.aspx

For Emergency Medicine CT/ST1 posts, this recruitment is lead by Health Education London on behalf of the UK. Please see their website for more details http://www.lpmde.ac.uk/

For Emergency Medicine ST4 posts, this recruitment is lead by Health Education Yorkshire and Humber on behalf of the UK. Please see their website for more details http://www.yorksandhumberdeanery.nhs.uk/

Kind Regards

Michele"
 

Medstart108

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    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/registration_applications/join_the_register.asp

    This is the best website for you to figure out if you are eligible. You'll need provisional registration and you likely will need EU citizenship to be able to apply to the foundation programme. To get provisional registration I believe you'll need to write the PLAB test. If you pass it and u have citizenship I think you can apply to the foundation programme.

    About the DO issue, I believe they do accept it but on their website they say you need to have a degree in allopathic medicine. However, because the DO in the US is really a allopathic + osteopathic degree whereas in the UK it is just an osteopathic degree they may still recognize it.

    Unless you went to this college:

    Touro University of California College of Osteopathic Medicine (TUCOM) (this only applies to graduates who graduated on or after 1 January 2010)

    You should be fine but better ask. If you did go to TUCOM then you are under the "may be recognized" list and you need to follow the instructions here:

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/registration_applications/14389.asp

    Overall, I believe that if you don't have EU citizenship you probably won't get a foundation spot, unless you have the "right to work" in the UK which at this point I have no clue how you can possible get.

    If you haven't done an intern year in the US you basically have to do foundation years in the UK, you can't go straight into speciality training.

    Foundation years don't really have an equivalent in the US because its post med school but pre-residency. You spend 2 years working as a junior doctor and rotating through different specialities for 4 months at a time, and you get paid. Your responsibilities are less than a PGY-1 i've heard, procedurally you'll probably be taking blood, inserting cannulas, seeing and clerking patients as your core duties.
     
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