SDN's book club

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by whoanelly, Apr 7, 2002.

  1. whoanelly

    whoanelly Member

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    Now that Oprah is going to stop her book club, why don't we start one of our own..since we all have so much spare time for reading. My first nomination for fiction is The House of God. It's hilarious, irreverent, and scary as ****. Here's blurb on it:
    They've come from the top of their med school class to begin the most harrowing year of their lives. Six eager interns, fashioning themselves as saviors in the world of the healing arts, are about to serve a year in the time-honored tradition of the hospital internship. Their year will be grueling--no sleep, stress, and insanity, tempered with love, humor and priceless rewards.
     
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  3. Hero

    Hero Senior Member

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    Harry Potter

    Lord of The Rings

    As a huge movie fan i saw the movie first but just had to find out what happens next! Greaatt books!
     
  4. vyc

    vyc Senior Member

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    are we looking for medical-related books?
    or just any book?
     
  5. MUN2005

    MUN2005 Miner?

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    "Emergency" by Mark Brown is a good one. He has compiled several non-fictional stories written by MD's, RN's PA's etc. from EDs around the country.
    Also, for a little suspense, "A Simple Plan" by Scott Smith is great too, it's a novel.
     
  6. ckent

    ckent Banned
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    If you guys are looking for some light reading to do before med school, I would recommend purchasing the book "Iserson's Getting into a Residency". The title says it all, and it tells you a lot of things that most med schools don't bother to tell you.
     
  7. Assassin

    Assassin Assassin

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    for those who can brave it...Brian Greene's "The Elegant Universe" - fun read that will take your mind off the med school crap.
     
  8. aquapants

    aquapants Member

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    OK, for my first post ever -- I have to recommend Richard Selzer's "Mortal Lessons: Notes on the Art of Surgery"

    I read a lot of literature (I'm an English major) and this book absolutely blew me away.

    Also, Oliver Sacks' "The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat"
     
  9. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats

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    Any book by CLIVE BARKER
     
  10. Assassin

    Assassin Assassin

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Scooby Doo:
    <strong>Any book by CLIVE BARKER</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Don't know about his books, but "undying"-the game kicks a$$!
     
  11. vyc

    vyc Senior Member

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    i'm an english minor who wanted to be a major and in any case, an avid reader.

    the only medically related book i can recommend is "The Physician." i can't remember the author... i think it started with an N, like Noah or something. i read it many years ago but remember it being quite good.

    i'm also a big fan of:
    Paolo Coelho (particularly "The Alchemist")
    Ayn Rand ("The Fountainhead" and "We, the Living")
    Virginia Woolf ("To The Lighthouse" and "Mrs. Dalloway")
    Milan Kundera ("The Unbearable Lightness of Being")
    Don DeLillo ("White Noise" and "The Body Artist")

    i can go on forever.
    don't read James Joyce's "Ulysses" unless you're a masochist like me.
     
  12. My nominees:

    Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert Heinlein
    TaiPan - Clavell
    To Kill a Mocking bird - Harper Lee
    The Island of the day Before - Umberto Eco
    (and Focoult's Pendulum too)
    * Relativity - Albert Einstein

    More when/if I can think of them.
     
  13. deva

    deva Senior Member

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    I firmly believe that all doctors (or people who want to be doctors) should read Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down." Fadiman follows the story of a Hmong girl with epilepsy. The Hmong have much different ideas about illness and medicine than the American doctors that the girl must see. The clash between them is tragic. The book is interesting and well-written, and says much about how doctors should deal with cultural differences (and gives a powerful example of what can go wrong).
     
  14. souljah1

    souljah1 Attending

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    The Glass Bead Game - Herman Hesse
    Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates - Tom Robbins
    A People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
    Grace and Grit - Ken Wilber
    Crime and Punishment - Doestoevsky
    White Teeth - Zadie Smith
    Arrowsmith - Sinclair Lewis
    The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran

    those are the first that came to mind. Good idea for a thread.
     
  15. Doctora Foxy

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by deva:
    <strong>I firmly believe that all doctors (or people who want to be doctors) should read Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down." Fadiman follows the story of a Hmong girl with epilepsy. The Hmong have much different ideas about illness and medicine than the American doctors that the girl must see. The clash between them is tragic. The book is interesting and well-written, and says much about how doctors should deal with cultural differences (and gives a powerful example of what can go wrong).</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">This book was the basis of my personal statement! <img border="0" alt="[Clappy]" title="" src="graemlins/clappy.gif" />

    Well, kind of. I was telling my cousin my ideas for a personal statement, and he's like, "you HAVE to read this book!".....I still have to!
     
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  17. watto

    watto Sleek White Pantsuit

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    "Et Tu, Babe" by Mark Leyner.

    Also, "Be True To Your School" - Greene, Greene, what was his first name...he wrote a book with Michael Jordan, I know....anyhow, this is his high school diary circa 1965, when the Beatles were hitting the U.S. and such. You won't be able to put it down.
     
  18. whoanelly

    whoanelly Member

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    Any would-be surgeons out there? US News has a write-up on a new book: "Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science" by Atul Gawande who is finishing his surgical residency in Boston. Sounds interesting.

    An excerpt from his interview:
    "Most people think having great hands is the measure of how good a surgeon you'll be. It's the decisions that are really the most important thing. A lot of the time the seemingly small decisions, like what suture you're going to use in a given situation, turn out to be what really matters."
     
  19. Suz177

    Suz177 Senior Member

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    Everyone should read Tuesdays with Morrie! Morrie is a retired professor who is dying and relates the entire experience weak by weak as a means of living and loving life to a former student of his.
     
  20. jmejia1

    jmejia1 Senior Member

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    "When the air hits your brain" by vertosick (sp?)
    I don't recall the spelling of the guys last name.
    Anyway, it was a very good book. i gurantee most of you will like it alot.
     
  21. strokchik

    strokchik Member

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    Call It Sleep, Henry Roth
    Invisible Monsters, Chuck Palahniuk
    White Noise, Don DeLillo
     
  22. deva

    deva Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Doctora Foxy:
    <strong>I was telling my cousin my ideas for a personal statement, and he's like, "you HAVE to read this book!".....I still have to!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Foxy, I think you would love it! (Actually, I would expect everyone to love it, so I'm sort of biased :D )

    For anyone interested in the history of medicine in the US, I would recommend "Major Problems in the History of American Medicine and Public Health," edited by Warner and Tighe. It consists of a series of essays and primary sources (meaning, if you are reading about 18th century practices there will be something that was published in the 18th century along with an article analyzing the situation). It is good because you can skip around and just read the articles or time periods that interest you.
     
  23. slipslap

    slipslap Junior Member

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    Sports Illustrated
    Rolling Stone
    Spin
    Maxim

    I'm quite well-read........ :)
     
  24. Catalyst

    Catalyst Enjoying Life

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    I'd have to say Measure of Our Days by Jerome Groopman and Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky (what an amazing book)..

    Sachin
     
  25. Dr. Geoff

    Dr. Geoff Mzungu

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    Intern Blues by Robert Marion

    Good because it is comprised of just voice diaries, so It gives you a feel of what it is really like.

    -Jeff
     

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