Apr 4, 2011
90
2
Status
Anyone else feel a little self-conscious if you driving your parent's old hand-me down luxury cars to school or social events? Most of my classmates seem to drive Honda Civics and Toyota Corollas? Do you get labeled as the "spoiled princess" or "douchebag" tag if you drive a nicer car than what most of your attendings drive?
 

Dial71

10+ Year Member
Jun 5, 2008
143
2
Status
Medical Student
Wow, you're not familiar with SDN, are you?

In before the flames.
 
About the Ads

LossForWords

PGY-1
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 29, 2008
4,388
16
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Anyone else feel a little self-conscious if you driving your parent's old hand-me down luxury cars to school or social events? Most of my classmates seem to drive Honda Civics and Toyota Corollas? Do you get labeled as the "spoiled princess" or "douchebag" tag if you drive a nicer car than what most of your attendings drive?
Pffft. Who cares? I guess you might get some haters if your parents consider a 2 year old Benz a "hand-me-down" but if it's something that looks like my sister-in-law's 12 year old Lexus, no one will mistake you for spoiled.
 

metallica81788

Keeper of the Llamaworm
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2007
12,119
348
Status
Attending Physician
Anyone else feel a little self-conscious if you driving your parent's old hand-me down luxury cars to school or social events? Most of my classmates seem to drive Honda Civics and Toyota Corollas? Do you get labeled as the "spoiled princess" or "douchebag" tag if you drive a nicer car than what most of your attendings drive?
No one really cares in my class. Our cars range from 20 year old clunkers to brand new Infinitis and BMWs. Most probably fall in the 2004 mid level sedan class.

Most of the people that have the really nice cars have rich families and the class knows that so I don't think anybody really cares.
 

2012mdc

Enjoying the Dark Side
5+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2010
2,269
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Anyone else feel a little self-conscious if you driving your parent's old hand-me down luxury cars to school or social events? Most of my classmates seem to drive Honda Civics and Toyota Corollas? Do you get labeled as the "spoiled princess" or "douchebag" tag if you drive a nicer car than what most of your attendings drive?
as long as you're not a douche or a spoiled brat no one will care
 
Jun 1, 2009
419
2
Status
Medical Student
If your car cost less than your tuition, you will have no friends because nobody likes poor people.
 

DrBowtie

Final Countdown
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Feb 24, 2005
15,488
1,878
Classyville
Status
Resident [Any Field]
People care less about the cars in the class and more about the vacations people take during breaks. That's the status symbol in med school.
 

JimmyChitwood

All eyez on me
Mar 15, 2010
139
1
Midwest
Status
Medical Student
Your car "situation" can be easily fixed in the future. Unfortunately, your dearth of self-confidence cannot.

I push a 1999 Toyota Echo around and I'll rock that thing until the wheels fall off. Nothing like whipping through the parking lots with my windows down and my swag turned up. Plus that beast gets like 94 mpg.

Had my undergrad basketball team won either of the last 2 ncaa basketball championships my friends and I were going to put my car in the canal that runs through downtown.
 

vasca

En la era postpasambre
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 7, 2008
1,155
23
Chilangolandia nuevamente
Status
I´m a doctor and don´t own a car. Heck, I don´t really know how to drive all that well. In the real world nobody really cares what you drive, but if you carpool a classmate they will be grateful.
 
About the Ads

mdquestion

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2009
157
0
Status
I mean, as someone who drives a 12 year old car with 100,000 miles on it and has worked before coming to med school...I can say that when I saw some 21/22 year old's in my class who had just graduated from undergrad driving $80,000 brand new Audi's/BMWs in my class....it did make me think poorly of them. I'm not jealous of the wealth or admonishing them from coming from a wealthy family...I just don't understand what sort of family would think that's an appropriate car for a medical student. Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.

Having said that, on practical terms you can run into awkward situations with your professors. A friend of mine lives in a luxury apartment building well out of the normal price range for a medical student (we're talking a $6,000/month two bedroom). He was talking to a prof about where he lived only to get a comment: "oh. I looked there with my wife, but we couldn't afford it." I think some of the mentality of "I need to mentor and guide and help out this poor, lowly new med student" goes away when your prof realizes you're richer than he/she is.
 

AlexMorph

10+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2007
5,527
19
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I mean, as someone who drives a 12 year old car with 100,000 miles on it and has worked before coming to med school...I can say that when I saw some 21/22 year old's in my class who had just graduated from undergrad driving $80,000 brand new Audi's/BMWs in my class....it did make me think poorly of them. I'm not jealous of the wealth or admonishing them from coming from a wealthy family...I just don't understand what sort of family would think that's an appropriate car for a medical student. Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.

Having said that, on practical terms you can run into awkward situations with your professors. A friend of mine lives in a luxury apartment building well out of the normal price range for a medical student (we're talking a $6,000/month two bedroom). He was talking to a prof about where he lived only to get a comment: "oh. I looked there with my wife, but we couldn't afford it." I think some of the mentality of "I need to mentor and guide and help out this poor, lowly new med student" goes away when your prof realizes you're richer than he/she is.
well said
 

Isoprop

Fascinating, tell me more
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2007
4,197
34
Status
Medical Student
Judging people by their cars is stupid. So is judging parents by their children's cars.
 

2012mdc

Enjoying the Dark Side
5+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2010
2,269
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I mean, as someone who drives a 12 year old car with 100,000 miles on it and has worked before coming to med school...I can say that when I saw some 21/22 year old's in my class who had just graduated from undergrad driving $80,000 brand new Audi's/BMWs in my class....it did make me think poorly of them. I'm not jealous of the wealth or admonishing them from coming from a wealthy family...I just don't understand what sort of family would think that's an appropriate car for a medical student. Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.

Having said that, on practical terms you can run into awkward situations with your professors. A friend of mine lives in a luxury apartment building well out of the normal price range for a medical student (we're talking a $6,000/month two bedroom). He was talking to a prof about where he lived only to get a comment: "oh. I looked there with my wife, but we couldn't afford it." I think some of the mentality of "I need to mentor and guide and help out this poor, lowly new med student" goes away when your prof realizes you're richer than he/she is.
I agree but you have to admit that if someone's parent's can afford that car for them as well as tuition they are really well off and their "real world" is going to be quite different.

I'm sure there are some med students out there who's families are worth tens of millions. Their real world is different from yours and mine
 

ArcGurren

only one will survive
Aug 6, 2010
1,920
14
Status
Medical Student
I mean, as someone who drives a 12 year old car with 100,000 miles on it and has worked before coming to med school...I can say that when I saw some 21/22 year old's in my class who had just graduated from undergrad driving $80,000 brand new Audi's/BMWs in my class....it did make me think poorly of them. I'm not jealous of the wealth or admonishing them from coming from a wealthy family...I just don't understand what sort of family would think that's an appropriate car for a medical student. Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.

Having said that, on practical terms you can run into awkward situations with your professors. A friend of mine lives in a luxury apartment building well out of the normal price range for a medical student (we're talking a $6,000/month two bedroom). He was talking to a prof about where he lived only to get a comment: "oh. I looked there with my wife, but we couldn't afford it." I think some of the mentality of "I need to mentor and guide and help out this poor, lowly new med student" goes away when your prof realizes you're richer than he/she is.
I agree with this for the most part... I spoke about this in another thread... while I don't have any personal issue with people who drive good/fancy cars, it doesn't stop me from getting irritated that they have more money to throw than I do. I'm driving a car from 1996 which still works just fine and since it's MY car I feel very fond of it.

Not much you can do. I do agree that those people should be generally more sensible about how they talk about money and expenses in front of other people though. It's pretty distasteful to be cavalier about it, even if you don't mean it in a bad way.
 

ArcGurren

only one will survive
Aug 6, 2010
1,920
14
Status
Medical Student
I agree but you have to admit that if someone's parent's can afford that car for them as well as tuition they are really well off and their "real world" is going to be quite different.

I'm sure there are some med students out there who's families are worth tens of millions. Their real world is different from yours and mine
You're right, but I don't think it does much for teaching self-reliance either. Though I guess they could live off of mommy and daddy's family trust fund forever if they wanted to...
 
About the Ads
C

cowme

People driving 80,000 dollar cars, living in 6K/month apartments and having their tuition paid by mommy and daddy are probably never going to need to learn how to be self-reliant.
 

2012mdc

Enjoying the Dark Side
5+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2010
2,269
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
People driving 80,000 dollar cars, living in 6K/month apartments and having their tuition paid by mommy and daddy are probably never going to need to learn how to be self-reliant.
exactly
 

ArcGurren

only one will survive
Aug 6, 2010
1,920
14
Status
Medical Student
People driving 80,000 dollar cars, living in 6K/month apartments and having their tuition paid by mommy and daddy are probably never going to need to learn how to be self-reliant.
Unless they get cut off from mommy and daddy, or if mommy and daddy lose a lot of money (god forbid) for some reason...
 

Geekchick921

Achievement Unlocked: MD
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2007
8,813
166
36
Status
Resident [Any Field]
If it really bothers you, I'll be happy to trade you my 15 year old Ford Taurus wagon with a perpetual check engine light, almost non-existent heat and paint chipping all over it. Whaddya say?
 

jrod09071989

1984
5+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2010
42
0
Status
Medical Student
I really don't think a car will tell you much about a person, growing up my family was dirt poor as most immigrant families. I remember buying school supplies late bc we couldn't afford it by time school started. Now things are way better and my parents did buy me a nice car, that doesn't mean I lack the common sense to appreciate money or how the world works. I still drive my old neighborhood friends when we go out, and I try to help them as best as we can. If your parents raise you right, you can still get a good car, and heck even some of the tuition paid for and still appreciate money, granted it is a fortunate situation to be in nonetheless.
 

FIREitUP

10+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2007
2,873
518
TBL
Status
Resident [Any Field]
why do you people give a **** about other people being self reliant and having their parents buy them nice cars? if my parents were willing to buy me a ballin' car, I'd take it, and I'm sure you would, too. Stop the hatin' and enjoy life.
 

Marcus Brody

Already has the grail.
10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2008
3,120
83
Status
Attending Physician
If you're taking out loans it makes zero sense. "Yeah, I accept financial aid and accrue $60k/year in debt at 8% interest but I drive in style!" :thumbup:

But otherwise, I guess I can't blame 'em. I'd spend money if I had it. The haters are just gonna hate.
 

Slack3r

Sicker than your average
10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2008
2,873
1,413
Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.
If they can afford it, why not?
 
About the Ads

Isoprop

Fascinating, tell me more
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2007
4,197
34
Status
Medical Student
I love the parenting advice on here.

"Son, I'm gonna teach you to be self-reliant. I will not give you an expensive car. Instead, I will give you an inexpensive car. That will teach you people just don't give you stuff in the real world."
 
  • Like
Reactions: QueenJames

surftheiop

10+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2008
1,913
27
Status
I dont think its a big deal unless your driving a Ferrari or something else that looks blatantly out of place in a fast food parking lot.

My parents bought me a used car for like 8k in highschool, and some people would harass me about how lucky I was to have parents who would buy me a car. So there is no way I could turn around and give someone else a hard time about it.

Although, if I saw someone driving a brand new BMW I might assume the person is too "well connected" to want to be friends with me so I might not initiate trying to get to know them as much as somebody else. That being said, I have several very wealthy friends, I just didn't know that at first when I got to know them.
 

OpalOnyx

10+ Year Member
Aug 15, 2008
561
2
Status
No need to hate on people who are enjoying the money that they have. That being said, my old car is the least of my problems so long as it is running and getting me from point A to B.
 
Apr 4, 2011
90
2
Status
I mean, as someone who drives a 12 year old car with 100,000 miles on it and has worked before coming to med school...I can say that when I saw some 21/22 year old's in my class who had just graduated from undergrad driving $80,000 brand new Audi's/BMWs in my class....it did make me think poorly of them. I'm not jealous of the wealth or admonishing them from coming from a wealthy family...I just don't understand what sort of family would think that's an appropriate car for a medical student. Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.

Having said that, on practical terms you can run into awkward situations with your professors. A friend of mine lives in a luxury apartment building well out of the normal price range for a medical student (we're talking a $6,000/month two bedroom). He was talking to a prof about where he lived only to get a comment: "oh. I looked there with my wife, but we couldn't afford it." I think some of the mentality of "I need to mentor and guide and help out this poor, lowly new med student" goes away when your prof realizes you're richer than he/she is.
Where does an apartment go for $6,000/month? Unless its in NYC or DC, or the Trump tower, I have a hard time imaging any apartment complex that manages to stay in business while charging that much.

Everything else, I totally agree with - even if most people aren't willing to admit it, unconsciously they will treat you differently if they see you driving a car that is beyond the means of most medical students or attendings. I feel as if this is true with at least one of my attendings who invited us to dinner. He probably understands that it used to be my parent's car, but I still think it rubbed him the wrong way. People's attitude of helping out the "lowly med students" goes way to condescenion especially if they feel that your parent's are pulling the strings and sheltering you from the real world.
 
Nov 4, 2010
126
0
GA
Status
Medical Student
I worry that others in my class will be jealous of my car as well. I drive a 2001 Honda Odyssey minivan that I just know will be the envy of my classmates. It also has some paint chipping off of it that gives it this super retro look.
 

IlDestriero

Ether Man
10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2007
7,832
7,682
The ivory tower.
Status
Attending Physician
Even if I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy my son or daughter something like that while at the same time footing a $300,000 tuition and living expenses bill. That's just not teaching them what the real world is like.
:confused:
My kids aren't going to pay a dime for their education and I'm sure they're going to be in my hand me down 6yr old former luxury cars as well. If they got into graduate school I might get them a entry level luxury car. What does that have to do with the real world. They don't live in the "real world". They're the children of 2 professionals. Our jobs allow us to provide the best for them. Their education, a stable home, some money, and sound advice is all we can give. They don't have to pretend their parents are on food stamps to fit in with their classmates. And, we don't have to deprive them of things we can afford to give them to teach them some theoretical lesson on how things "really" are. Neither my wife nor I struggled growing up. We both respect money and live well within our means.
It's how you're raised, not what you have.
BTW, there are >$6000/month 2 and 3 BR apartments in every major city in the country. They're the big penthouses on top of the luxury apartment buildings or the townhouses on the water. I paid almost $4000/mo for a 3 BR apartment as a fellow. It wasn't even that nice.
 
Last edited:

DrYoda

Space Cowboy
10+ Year Member
Jun 22, 2008
13,815
120
Dagobah System
Status
Attending Physician
These comments over the past month or so on SDN has been informative, I had no idea so many haters were among us.




People care less about the cars in the class and more about the vacations people take during breaks. That's the status symbol in med school.
lol so true.
 

Daedra22

10+ Year Member
Nov 20, 2009
781
37
Status
Attending Physician
People care less about the cars in the class and more about the vacations people take during breaks. That's the status symbol in med school.
qft x 2

I really don't care what cars people drive. Good for you if you came from a family that has cars to hand down to you - if I had a family like that, I'd drive a free car too.
 
Mar 6, 2011
111
3
Status
Medical Student
If I'm driving a Bentley, my kid is sure as heck not going to be driving a Toyota Corolla.

Everything is relative.

No reason to judge those with more wealth, because you know you wish that you were in their position.
 
C

cowme

:confused:
My kids aren't going to pay a dime for their education and I'm sure they're going to be in my hand me down 6yr old former luxury cars as well. If they got into graduate school I might get them a entry level luxury car. What does that have to do with the real world. They don't live in the "real world". They're the children of 2 professionals. Our jobs allow us to provide the best for them. Their education, a stable home, some money, and sound advice is all we can give. They don't have to pretend their parents are on food stamps to fit in with their classmates. And, we don't have to deprive them of things we can afford to give them to teach them some theoretical lesson on how things "really" are. Neither my wife nor I struggled growing up. We both respect money and live well within our means. My wife's friend's husband just bought a Rolls Royce. WTF is that stupidity all about? $400k on a car. (Yes, he's short, bald AND overweight.) Their kids are damaged goods, and they're all getting worse. The more he makes, the more comically ridiculous their lives get. Fortunately we only see them around once a year.:smuggrin:
It's how you're raised, not what you have.
BTW, there are >$6000/month 2 and 3 BR apartments in every major city in the country. They're the big penthouses on top of the luxury apartment buildings or the townhouses on the water. I paid almost $4000/mo for a 3 BR apartment as a fellow. It wasn't even that nice.
QFT. My parents are physicians and paid for every cent of my education. Yet I drove a 15 year old minivan throughout college and med school, while my friends taking out loans drove mustangs. I pay half the rent for my apartment that my friends in mega-debt paid while in med school. If I wanted a nicer or car or bigger apartment I'm sure my parents would have supported it, but I never even thought to ask because I thought it was absurd to see some of the places my friends lived. Now, I'm cut off, and still live in my crappy studio apartment and have plenty of money to put away with my residency paychecks. I know that I am in an extremely lucky position, but just because your parents support you doesn't mean you can't learn how to value money and be self sufficient in the real world.
 

thecalccobra

10+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2007
214
20
Status
QFT. My parents are physicians and paid for every cent of my education. Yet I drove a 15 year old minivan throughout college and med school, while my friends taking out loans drove mustangs. I pay half the rent for my apartment that my friends in mega-debt paid while in med school. If I wanted a nicer or car or bigger apartment I'm sure my parents would have supported it, but I never even thought to ask because I thought it was absurd to see some of the places my friends lived. Now, I'm cut off, and still live in my crappy studio apartment and have plenty of money to put away with my residency paychecks. I know that I am in an extremely lucky position, but just because your parents support you doesn't mean you can't learn how to value money and be self sufficient in the real world.
:thumbup:
 

Narmerguy

Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Jul 14, 2007
6,878
1,308
To be honest I don't want my parents to buy me an expensive car. It doesn't mean anything if I didn't even earn it but had to get it as a gift from someone else's hard work. If I buy something expensive I'll care because I purchased it through my own hard work and my own productivity, not my parents.

At some point (which I consider college graduation) the cord needs to be cut and I need to function as an adult on my own.
 

DeadCactus

SDN Lifetime Donor
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2006
2,700
903
Status
Attending Physician
A car is a tangible hint at where you come from and what you value. Similar to tattoos or your clothes, people are going to use it to draw conclusions about your personality. It's part of how you present yourself.

And yes, it will probably play a role in your interactions with peers. Only the rare idiot will try to paint you as a bad person over something like your car, but the kid who grew up on food stamps probably isn't going to hold his breathe on being able to relate to you.

Additionally, it's asinine to pretend it's a one-way street. The 22-year old driving dad's Audi isn't scrambling to get to know the 34 year old ex-paramedic driving an old Honda Civic. Hell, most people on this board have probably drifted apart from many of their old friends as our experiences in life drifted further and further apart.

It's human nature, we associate with people similar to us. Everyone can pretend they're above that, but it's bulls--t. It's not a value judgement against dissimilar people; we all just find people we can relate to more palatable to be around and externally visible identifiers are going to be the preliminary round of sorting into like and unlike...
 

perutz

10+ Year Member
May 19, 2008
51
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I think what matters more is how you drive lol. I was stuck in traffic because of an accident one day and usually when this happens, a few drivers cut out of the lane and drive in the shoulder and then cut back into traffic. Being a self-respecting person I usually shift my car to the very edge of the right lane (I believe this is technically legal since I am still within the lane) so as to intimidate drivers so they won't cut in front of me. It turns out that when I did this, I realized the person trying to cut in was my attending!
 

Slack3r

Sicker than your average
10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2008
2,873
1,413
Where does an apartment go for $6,000/month? Unless its in NYC or DC, or the Trump tower, I have a hard time imaging any apartment complex that manages to stay in business while charging that much.
Clearly you've never been to a major metro area.
 
About the Ads