1. Hey Guest! Check out the 3 MCAT Study Plan Options listed in the 'stickies' area at the top of the forums (BoomBoom, SN2ed, and MCATJelly). Let us know which you like best.

    Also, we now offer a MCAT Test-Prep Exhibitions Forum where you can ask questions directly from the test-prep services.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
  3. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

separation of enantiomers help

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by specialflava, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. specialflava

    specialflava Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    hey everyone, just had a question i can't seem to find the answer to. the aamc topic list includes "separation of enantiomers by biological means"...i've looked through my textbooks, review books, and did a google search, finding nothing but the formation of diastereomer salts and chiral chromatography as means of enantiomeric separation. does anyone know what aamc means by "biological means"? thanks in advance!
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. IckeyShuffle

    IckeyShuffle MS1 t-minus 1.5 months..
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    613
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    freaky, i just looked at that literally 30 seconds ago and thought the same thing.
     
  4. Noeljan

    Noeljan Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hey there
    I believe you can react a sample of enantiomers with another chiral compound, producing diasteromers (bc it will selectively act) then you can separate by physical means.
     
  5. Moses MD

    Moses MD I got a staff
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    hmm, could mean several things. i mean, you can't distinguish enantiomers from one another by physical means, and the only react differently when other chiral reagents are involved. So, it makes sense if you want to separate them to make them into diastereomeric salts or using chiral chromatography. Biologically it is simple - enzymes. Enzymes are very specific for their substrate, right down to the substrates chirality, so you can use an enzyme specific for, let's say, R configuration, have it convert all R's to a new product, then separate based on the now different chemical properties, then revert the new product back to the old product. Also, you could probably genetically engineer E. Coli or yeast to produce a certain enantiomer by transfecting a plasmid encoding for an enzyme specific too that configuration.

    Hope that makes sense.
     
  6. Kikaku21

    Kikaku21 Senior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    704
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Thats about it. But really... I don't think this stuf is going to be on the exam without a decent amount of background.
     

Share This Page