crazypsychstudent

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I started reading about shared psychosis and I'm really interested in doing research on it. However, I can only find a handful of articles. Does anyone know of any good articles?
 

WisNeuro

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There isn't much, it is extremely rare. I wouldn't suggest pursuing it as a grad school project as you would likely be confined to case studies and very low n. As for measurements, I've never seen one. Psychosis in general relies more heavily on history and report rather than questionnaire data.
 
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crazypsychstudent

Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) Candidate
Sep 21, 2014
124
24
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Psychology Student
There isn't much, it is extremely rare. I wouldn't suggest pursuing it as a grad school project as you would likely be confined to case studies and very low n. As for measurements, I've never seen one. Psychosis in general relies more heavily on history and report rather than questionnaire data.
That's interesting. Maybe I could pursue it as a side project, but I would be limited to populations who have already been diagnosed with it, unless I could create a measurement for it. I feel like more people have it than are actually diagnosed and simply don't know what it is, or have it to a lesser degree. I say this because all of the case studies I read were pretty severe.
 

WisNeuro

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Well, you consider that schizophrenia and psychosis is about 1% of the population. Shared psychosis is a very small % of that population. There likely are more than present for treatment, but it's still just a very small number when you consider base rates. And, I don't think any short measure would be great for this. Psychosis in general can be complicated and needs a variety of data sources to accurately tease out.
 
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Peacemaker36

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Also, the concept of shared psychosis is kind of being phased out. In DSM5 folie a deux won't be a separate disorder, it will be considered a specifier for delusional disorder.
 
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PsychBiker

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In practice, I have only heard of it once and even then it was hearsay from someone else, so I imagine its very rare.
 

CheetahGirl

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An alternative idea is to examine transgenerational psychotic disorders or the underlying genetic component in some diagnoses, like schizophrenia. The SMI population is an interesting population and you may come across shared psychosis in your studies of the disorders across generations (as well as comorbidities such as the effects of intergenerational family violence). All would make for interesting and necessary research in behavioral health.
That's interesting. Maybe I could pursue it as a side project, but I would be limited to populations who have already been diagnosed with it, unless I could create a measurement for it. I feel like more people have it than are actually diagnosed and simply don't know what it is, or have it to a lesser degree. I say this because all of the case studies I read were pretty severe.