mpdoc2

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One of my presentations was acceted for a poster presentation at a national meeting that has its own journal (American society of Hematology, publishes in the Blood Journal) Should I list my research as a poster presentation or published abstract in Blood?
 

WhoisJohnGalt

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One of my presentations was acceted for a poster presentation at a national meeting that has its own journal (American society of Hematology, publishes in the Blood Journal) Should I list my research as a poster presentation or published abstract in Blood?
Poster presentation.
 

Good Mountain

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Poster presentation.

So if you present a poster or oral presentation in a Congress that publishes your abstract in a journal, then you should write it as poster/oral presentation and not by published abstract?

What qualifies as a published abstract then?
 

ResidentMD

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So if you present a poster or oral presentation in a Congress that publishes your abstract in a journal, then you should write it as poster/oral presentation and not by published abstract?

What qualifies as a published abstract then?
I agree - I have the same question. One of my abstracts was published in CHEST last year. I'm inclined to submit it, as it does come under a 'peer-reviewed abstract publication'.

Anyone has thoughts on this? Any feedback at interviews?
 

aProgDirector

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There are no hard and fast rules here, so you need to do whatever seems ethically valid to you.


My feeling:
If they take all of the posters from a meeting and put them in a journal (usually in a supplement) then it's just a poster

If you're poster is felt to be outstanding, and is chosen as a subgroup to be pulished in the main journal, then that's a published abstract.
 

Jinterpol

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Simply b/c it's "in print" somewhere doesn't mean it's the same as an accepted abstract to a journal. For instance, if you presented at the American Tranplant Conference and they print your abstract in a book that may or may not have also been printed in a journal they are affiliated with like Tranplant Proceedings or whatever, your submission is for a PRESENTATION. If you submit your article to a journal as an abstract or a publication, it is a PUBLISHED abstract.

BUT...these rules are bent all the time.
 

Pinkertinkle

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My view is that if you have real publications i.e. full length peer reviewed papers, then designate those under the peer reviewed paper/abstract and put all your published abstracts as posters so you don't get them mixed in with the legitimate stuff. If you however have no real papers, then you might as well put your published abstracts in that section.
 

doc20

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so I have a publication that has been accepted but not published yet, so i can still include this?
 

ResidentMD

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My view is that if you have real publications i.e. full length peer reviewed papers, then designate those under the peer reviewed paper/abstract and put all your published abstracts as posters so you don't get them mixed in with the legitimate stuff. If you however have no real papers, then you might as well put your published abstracts in that section.
I agree - the issue is that the abstract is actually traceable when you do a Google Scholar search. It has a page number,etc so I thought it may be worth it. aProgDirector, is the "ethical issue" something to worry about? I mean, would one be making a fool of himself/herself by putting it under "Published Abstracts"?
 

doc20

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Yes, I believe there is an option for "in press" or "accepted"
no there is no such option as in press or accepted
neither does ERAS allow to enter a publication with a future publication date, volume, page # of journal! obviously that information cant be available until the paper is published
and some of this journals has a delay of 2-3 months from acceptance to publication !!!! by that time the ERAS applications would have already began?
ehh what do I do?
 

Rogue Synapse

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Under the "publications" subtab in the "application" tab, choose "Peer Reviewed Journal Articles/Abstracts (Other Than Published). That will let you list pubs that aren't fully published yet, using the "Publication Status" selector.
 
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doc20

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ooh ok thanks!!!
so now what exactly is the different between 'ACCEPTED' and 'IN PRESS'
 

Rogue Synapse

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If they have been accepted and are just awaiting a pub date then in press is appropriate. Otherwise it's "submitted."
Once you have the acceptance letter in your inbox, "in press" is totally safe to put. Nowadays the e-pub comes well before the actual print version, so once papers are accepted they are pretty much by default "in press".
 

doc20

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thats what I would have thought!!!
Why would ERAS make so many drop down boxes just to confuse the $%^& out of the poor Med student brains?
 

Rogue Synapse

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Well, "provisional accepted" is a valid choice, too. I've got a paper that has been accepted by a journal under the condition that we add a small experiment. This should take less than a month, but it's nice to be able to put that my paper has been "provisional accepted" rather than just "submitted".