Oct 13, 2017
1
1
I have wanted to study in Italy ever since I was 13. I'm 21 now, so it is a pretty big life goal though I don't want to stay there for the rest of my life. Its taken me time along with a failed career path to find out what I want to do, but I've decided I want to become a psychiatrist.

From my understanding medical school in Italy is 6 years, and you do not need a bachelors degree(Italian bachelor degrees are 3 years) to enter. Residency is around 5 years. In USA you need a 4 year bachelors degree, 4 years of medical school, and then 4 years of residency. I have heard that it is hard to get a USA residency when you come from a foreign school, but that your chances are better depending on what you are going to become. Supposedly psychiatry is one of the easier ones to get a residency in.

Basically I was wondering if I would be better off getting my bachelor degree in Italy and going to medical school here in the USA, or if I should take my chances with medical school in Italy and try to get a USA residency once I graduate?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 6, 2017
120
68
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
1. Three years of residency for Family Medicine
2. Yes, its hard to get a residency as a Foreign Grad
3. Study and graduate from US Medical School
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I am currently studying in Italy and I do like it. However, Italians are very disorganized in general so things at school can be frustrating at times, but so far I am enjoying it and I am in my 2nd year. It's very weird system for exams and classes, one exam worth 100%, so not like in north america where it can be 25%, then 40%, etc. There are a bunch of med schools in English so you can have many to chose from. Once you get to clinicals though, you have to speak relatively well Italian, otherwise it's a problem so that is the extra burden on top of class.

I would just do med school straight in Italy, but that's me. It will save you a lot of time. As for returning to the US to practice, it's definitely doable. Harder as an IMG, but doable for sure. However, you actually might find that you might like to stay in Europe. There is France, Switzerland, beautiful countries. Lots of opportunity here and doctors may not earn as much, but they are WAY happier. Health system in the states is so messed up. I am Canadian and I never had any interest in going to the states, and a lot of our profs who are physicians think it's not the best idea to practice in the US. Up to you though!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
About the Ads

rico_suave

2+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2017
12
0
I am currently studying in Italy and I do like it. However, Italians are very disorganized in general so things at school can be frustrating at times, but so far I am enjoying it and I am in my 2nd year. It's very weird system for exams and classes, one exam worth 100%, so not like in north america where it can be 25%, then 40%, etc. There are a bunch of med schools in English so you can have many to chose from. Once you get to clinicals though, you have to speak relatively well Italian, otherwise it's a problem so that is the extra burden on top of class.

I would just do med school straight in Italy, but that's me. It will save you a lot of time. As for returning to the US to practice, it's definitely doable. Harder as an IMG, but doable for sure. However, you actually might find that you might like to stay in Europe. There is France, Switzerland, beautiful countries. Lots of opportunity here and doctors may not earn as much, but they are WAY happier. Health system in the states is so messed up. I am Canadian and I never had any interest in going to the states, and a lot of our profs who are physicians think it's not the best idea to practice in the US. Up to you though!
Hi Maskchamp,

I am also considering applying to medical school in Italy next year. If you don't mind, can you tell me which school you are attending? How was the application process? Is there a certain level of italian you have to know from the start or can you just enter with little knowledge and work your way up for when you enter year 3? Btw what is the level of italian needed at year 3? How many international students are in your year? And lastly, how easy/difficult is it for international students to get scholarships?

If you are able to answer any of these questions (i know it's a lot) i'd be super appreciative. Thanks!
 
Oct 29, 2017
23
3
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I am currently studying in Italy and I do like it. However, Italians are very disorganized in general so things at school can be frustrating at times, but so far I am enjoying it and I am in my 2nd year. It's very weird system for exams and classes, one exam worth 100%, so not like in north america where it can be 25%, then 40%, etc. There are a bunch of med schools in English so you can have many to chose from. Once you get to clinicals though, you have to speak relatively well Italian, otherwise it's a problem so that is the extra burden on top of class.

I would just do med school straight in Italy, but that's me. It will save you a lot of time. As for returning to the US to practice, it's definitely doable. Harder as an IMG, but doable for sure. However, you actually might find that you might like to stay in Europe. There is France, Switzerland, beautiful countries. Lots of opportunity here and doctors may not earn as much, but they are WAY happier. Health system in the states is so messed up. I am Canadian and I never had any interest in going to the states, and a lot of our profs who are physicians think it's not the best idea to practice in the US. Up to you though!

Are you from north america? I am a Canadian and I am heavily considering going to an MD school in Europe. Only I am a non-eu and my options for post graduation are what? I wouldn't mind staying in the EU.

What are you plans post graduation?
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hi Maskchamp,

I am also considering applying to medical school in Italy next year. If you don't mind, can you tell me which school you are attending? How was the application process? Is there a certain level of italian you have to know from the start or can you just enter with little knowledge and work your way up for when you enter year 3? Btw what is the level of italian needed at year 3? How many international students are in your year? And lastly, how easy/difficult is it for international students to get scholarships?

If you are able to answer any of these questions (i know it's a lot) i'd be super appreciative. Thanks!

I am Canadians and at Humanitas in Milan, pretty new, been around since 2014. The good thing is that the application process is very very easy. You just register for the exam. It's not like in North America where you need transcripts, letters, volunteer hours, all that cap, etc. There were 40 spots for non-eu students last year, about the same again I think. If you score in the top 40, you're in no matter what. It is not as hard as it seems to be honest, some people who score in the top 40 end up choosing another school or deferring so you get that spot say if you were number 41. We have 40 internationals, with the rest being Italians. 3 Canadians, 2 Americans, lots from Germany/France/Switzerland, and the rest from other places around the world. For the first year people, there were a few Canadians, nobody can freakin get in there.

Ages range from about 19-35 or so. Mostly early/mid 20s and some older. The big obstacle is the bureaucracy...oh man, I can't even describe the process and how inefficient and annoying it is. That's what really, really p***es people off.

Private schools each have their own exam. For Humanitas, it's the UKCAT, which is much much easier than the MCAT. For public schools, it's the IMAT which is very easy (compared to other exams, only 2 hours). You get 1.5 points for a correct answer, and -.3 for a wrong one. If you can afford to go to a private school, I would definitely suggest it. Public schools are good an all, but a mess compared to private. There are a few private schools to chose from too, 2 in Milan, a new one in Torino, and one in Bologna. Also, a huge plus is that if you have done a biology or say a pre-med degree, you can get a TON of exemptions. My first year in terms of course load was a total breeze, I got something like 30 credits. Also, San Raffele is the other private school in Milan and they have an agreement with OSAP which I thought was pretty cool.

You don't need to know any Italian whatsoever. All classes, tests, etc, are in English. You just have to know basic Italian when you start your 3rd year, which is not too hard considering you'll be in the country for 2 years. Like pretty much what the doctor asks you when you go for a visit, how are you feeling, taking patient history, etc. Only the clinical contact in the 3rd year is in Italian, all the tests and all are still in English. We just can't ask a 65 year old from Naples in English how he's feeling.

For scholarships, you have to score either number 1 or 2 on the entrance exam out of the 40 spots they have for internationals. I scored in the 20s cause I'm no genius if I remember right, but the two kids who were number 1 and 2 got scholarships. You do have to maintain an 90% to keep, which I personally think is too high, puts a lot of pressure on the student. Doesn't mean you need to ace every test, some you can ace and the other might do bad on, but the overall average has to be a 90. But the interesting thing is that if you do bad on a test, you can reject the mark and take it again (lots of times). I know people that have rejected a mark 3 times.

In terms of the future, I'm just trying to get through school, lol. But I always do think about Canada, but speaking fluent French and soon Italian, the EU options open up. Don't forget about the UK, heard it's good to work.

For the Canadians and Americans, I heard it's hard for IMGs to go back to North America, but I'm sure it's not impossible. Funny thing, our school does have specific USMLE prep courses that you can take at no charge. I have NO interest in going to the States, but some people are taking them.

Overall, I'm quite happy to be honest. Italians, are very disorganized, so from an North American POV, it can be very very annoying at times. Hard to believe they built the Roman Empire...As they say however,
"Heaven is where the police are British, the cooks are French, the
mechanics German, the lovers Italian and it's all organised by the
Swiss. Hell is where the chefs are British, the mechanics French, the
lover's Swiss, the police German and it's all organised by the Italians."

At first it's tough, especially being far way and not speaking the language, but everyone is pretty much in your situation so you should make some good friends. I just didn't want to wait 2 years to get in, get more letters of recommendation, volunteer hours, etc. I found it really annoying. But keep exploring. More than happy to answer any other questions, I know that it feels like and have been through all of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users

rico_suave

2+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2017
12
0
I am Canadians and at Humanitas in Milan, pretty new, been around since 2014. The good thing is that the application process is very very easy. You just register for the exam. It's not like in North America where you need transcripts, letters, volunteer hours, all that cap, etc. There were 40 spots for non-eu students last year, about the same again I think. If you score in the top 40, you're in no matter what. It is not as hard as it seems to be honest, some people who score in the top 40 end up choosing another school or deferring so you get that spot say if you were number 41. We have 40 internationals, with the rest being Italians. 3 Canadians, 2 Americans, lots from Germany/France/Switzerland, and the rest from other places around the world. For the first year people, there were a few Canadians, nobody can freakin get in there.

Ages range from about 19-35 or so. Mostly early/mid 20s and some older. The big obstacle is the bureaucracy...oh man, I can't even describe the process and how inefficient and annoying it is. That's what really, really p***es people off.

Private schools each have their own exam. For Humanitas, it's the UKCAT, which is much much easier than the MCAT. For public schools, it's the IMAT which is very easy (compared to other exams, only 2 hours). You get 1.5 points for a correct answer, and -.3 for a wrong one. If you can afford to go to a private school, I would definitely suggest it. Public schools are good an all, but a mess compared to private. There are a few private schools to chose from too, 2 in Milan, a new one in Torino, and one in Bologna. Also, a huge plus is that if you have done a biology or say a pre-med degree, you can get a TON of exemptions. My first year in terms of course load was a total breeze, I got something like 30 credits. Also, San Raffele is the other private school in Milan and they have an agreement with OSAP which I thought was pretty cool.

You don't need to know any Italian whatsoever. All classes, tests, etc, are in English. You just have to know basic Italian when you start your 3rd year, which is not too hard considering you'll be in the country for 2 years. Like pretty much what the doctor asks you when you go for a visit, how are you feeling, taking patient history, etc. Only the clinical contact in the 3rd year is in Italian, all the tests and all are still in English. We just can't ask a 65 year old from Naples in English how he's feeling.

For scholarships, you have to score either number 1 or 2 on the entrance exam out of the 40 spots they have for internationals. I scored in the 20s cause I'm no genius if I remember right, but the two kids who were number 1 and 2 got scholarships. You do have to maintain an 90% to keep, which I personally think is too high, puts a lot of pressure on the student. Doesn't mean you need to ace every test, some you can ace and the other might do bad on, but the overall average has to be a 90. But the interesting thing is that if you do bad on a test, you can reject the mark and take it again (lots of times). I know people that have rejected a mark 3 times.

In terms of the future, I'm just trying to get through school, lol. But I always do think about Canada, but speaking fluent French and soon Italian, the EU options open up. Don't forget about the UK, heard it's good to work.

For the Canadians and Americans, I heard it's hard for IMGs to go back to North America, but I'm sure it's not impossible. Funny thing, our school does have specific USMLE prep courses that you can take at no charge. I have NO interest in going to the States, but some people are taking them.

Overall, I'm quite happy to be honest. Italians, are very disorganized, so from an North American POV, it can be very very annoying at times. Hard to believe they built the Roman Empire...As they say however,
"Heaven is where the police are British, the cooks are French, the
mechanics German, the lovers Italian and it's all organised by the
Swiss. Hell is where the chefs are British, the mechanics French, the
lover's Swiss, the police German and it's all organised by the Italians."

At first it's tough, especially being far way and not speaking the language, but everyone is pretty much in your situation so you should make some good friends. I just didn't want to wait 2 years to get in, get more letters of recommendation, volunteer hours, etc. I found it really annoying. But keep exploring. More than happy to answer any other questions, I know that it feels like and have been through all of it.
Wow! Thanks so much for the detailed reply!

Few things that I wanted to clear up. You said that "For the first year people, there were a few Canadians, nobody can freakin get in there." What did you mean by nobody can get in there? Isn't the entrance exam fairly easy as you said?

Also "I just didn't want to wait 2 years to get in, get more letters of recommendation, volunteer hours, etc." were you referring to Canada? As in having to get all this stuff and waiting 2 years to attend a Canadian med school vs the Italy where things are much simpler?

And for the admissions test, did you have to travel to Italy to take it?

Anyhoos, thanks so much again!
 
Last edited:

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Wow! Thanks so much for the detailed reply!

Few things that I wanted to clear up. You said that "For the first year people, there were a few Canadians, nobody can freakin get in there." What did you mean by nobody can get in there? Isn't the entrance exam fairly easy as you said?

Also "I just didn't want to wait 2 years to get in, get more letters of recommendation, volunteer hours, etc." were you referring to Canada? As in having to get all this stuff and waiting 2 years to attend a Canadian med school vs the Italy where things are much simpler?

And for the admissions test, did you have to travel to Italy to take it?

Anyhoos, thanks so much again!

I meant no Canadians can get into med school in Canada (me being one of them); yes, I was referring to Canada and the US with the 1 or perhaps even 2 year wait and getting your stats up and all. You just take an exam here and you're in or not. The IMAT for the public schools is just basic bio/chem and logic. Pretty easy, as a university student you have definitely had harder.

No, did not have to travel to Italy actually. The good thing was that they have a lot of locations you can take the test worldwide. Few in Canada, in US, all over Europe and even in Oceania and South America. Pretty cool.

On another note, they have some great schools in the UK as well, and in Czech Republic, Charles University, I hear it's quite good. Let me know if you have any questions, happy to answer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

rico_suave

2+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2017
12
0
I meant no Canadians can get into med school in Canada (me being one of them); yes, I was referring to Canada and the US with the 1 or perhaps even 2 year wait and getting your stats up and all. You just take an exam here and you're in or not. The IMAT for the public schools is just basic bio/chem and logic. Pretty easy, as a university student you have definitely had harder.

No, did not have to travel to Italy actually. The good thing was that they have a lot of locations you can take the test worldwide. Few in Canada, in US, all over Europe and even in Oceania and South America. Pretty cool.

On another note, they have some great schools in the UK as well, and in Czech Republic, Charles University, I hear it's quite good. Let me know if you have any questions, happy to answer.
I am looking into the public school route for financial reasons. For the calculations of fees, do you know if they calculate it based on family income or just on the category thing based on country of origin? For instance my country and the US is in the highest category with the fees being about EUR 4500/yr. I'm guessing since Humanitas is private, you may not know about this but I figured I'd still ask.

Also, I know you said it's crazy disorganized with bureaucratic issues especially at public schools. Can you elaborate a bit more on that?
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
They calculate based on family income, doesn't matter where you're from.

For the bureaucratic crap, there is so much. First you have to get your high school diploma validated and declared, which is a pain in the ass. Gotta go to back to your high school, have them print it, then to another office for validation and all. Then you have to apply for a student visa at the Italian embassy. You need proof of admission and a bunch other statements, they will let you know. Like making sure you have a place to stay, paid first tuition installment, etc. Good luck making an appointment and actually being seen at the time of your appointment...

Once you get to Italy, then you have to apply for your residency permit, get a tax code, go to the police station for fingerprints, get your passport and citizenship confirmed, open a bank account which is a requirement, the list goes on and on. NOBODY at the government offices speak English....I really do think getting into med school was easier than dealing with Italian bureaucracy, not even joking. I had to go to the immigration office freaking 3 times because of how inefficient things are even though I had all the necessary papers. I was shocked, seriously.

Each school has a student office, so they should be able to give you some information and guide you through the process once you get into the country. You can give the school that you are thinking of applying a call, they should be able to help.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

DokterMom

SDN Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Mar 1, 2013
5,421
12,628
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
@Diabla - If you still need to finish your bachelor's degree and want to practice medicine in the U.S., your best bet is to do your college in the U.S. and study abroad in Italy for a year, then return to the U.S. for medical school.

Of course, if you want to practice medicine in Italy, my answer would be very different.
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Yes, if you go to a US med school, you will definitely practice there. However, there are a ton of IMGs in the US. Some people who graduate from a European school do score very high on the USMLEs. And you can always apply while you are employed here, it's not like you will be out of a job or anything. If you hear that IMGs don't score high on the USMLEs its mainly that English is not their first language, it has nothing to do with the education. Some people who are European or from SA their English is not as fluent. Up to you ultimately. Although since the application process is so easy, and is free except for the exam registration which I think is about 200 USD, you should definitely apply. Honestly, the IMAT will be so easy for you if you are in university. Chances are you will get in. You have definitely had harder exams. Once your in, at least you have a back up.
 
About the Ads
Mar 7, 2018
1
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I am currently studying in Italy and I do like it. However, Italians are very disorganized in general so things at school can be frustrating at times, but so far I am enjoying it and I am in my 2nd year. It's very weird system for exams and classes, one exam worth 100%, so not like in north america where it can be 25%, then 40%, etc. There are a bunch of med schools in English so you can have many to chose from. Once you get to clinicals though, you have to speak relatively well Italian, otherwise it's a problem so that is the extra burden on top of class.

I would just do med school straight in Italy, but that's me. It will save you a lot of time. As for returning to the US to practice, it's definitely doable. Harder as an IMG, but doable for sure. However, you actually might find that you might like to stay in Europe. There is France, Switzerland, beautiful countries. Lots of opportunity here and doctors may not earn as much, but they are WAY happier. Health system in the states is so messed up. I am Canadian and I never had any interest in going to the states, and a lot of our profs who are physicians think it's not the best idea to practice in the US. Up to you though!

What do you think your chances are of getting a residency spot in Canada after your Italian degree? Is there opportunity for electives, etc?
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
What do you think your chances are of getting a residency spot in Canada after your Italian degree? Is there opportunity for electives, etc?

I'm not sure actually. The school does have a lot of electives in the US and elsewhere in Europe, but not yet in Canada. It's a pretty new school though so they probably will have some in Canada in the next few years I'm assuming.

I think it will be hard, but French is also my first language, so that opens up Quebec. Everyone asks/tells me that it will be tough to go back to Canada, and yes, I agree, but I also never state that I really do want to move back there. I LOVE Canada, it's my country, and if a job opened up, I probably would take it, however, I do like Europe a lot, the history, languages, accessibility, there is a lot to do and many options to chose from in terms of where you want to practice. Honestly, I was just so happy to get into med school, at some point, I really didn't care where I would go as long as I could study. I had no shot in North America.

So I guess I'll see what comes along in terms of Canada and the future. At this point I'm just trying to get through exams :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Jul 4, 2018
2
2
I'm not sure actually. The school does have a lot of electives in the US and elsewhere in Europe, but not yet in Canada. It's a pretty new school though so they probably will have some in Canada in the next few years I'm assuming.

I think it will be hard, but French is also my first language, so that opens up Quebec. Everyone asks/tells me that it will be tough to go back to Canada, and yes, I agree, but I also never state that I really do want to move back there. I LOVE Canada, it's my country, and if a job opened up, I probably would take it, however, I do like Europe a lot, the history, languages, accessibility, there is a lot to do and many options to chose from in terms of where you want to practice. Honestly, I was just so happy to get into med school, at some point, I really didn't care where I would go as long as I could study. I had no shot in North America.

So I guess I'll see what comes along in terms of Canada and the future. At this point I'm just trying to get through exams :)

Hi! I know this thread was from awhile back, but I still wanted to give it a shot and ask you a few questions. :)

I am European, and somehow after going to an international school I decided to pursue medicine in North America, so I am now a chemistry major in Canada; however, even though I really really like Canada as a whole, studying on PEI made me want to go back to Europe. Also, I finally realized that my chances of being accepted to a medical school here are very slim, if not impossible. So studying medicine Italy, particularly in Milan or Pavia, is currently my top option. I read that you liked your choice and now as more time has passed, do you still have the same point of view? Since you no doubt have met other international students and perhaps now that you know more about other universities, if you had a chance to study somewhere else in Europe where would that be?

I've been researching a lot, and now I am starting to doubt my options a lot. Obviously no place will be entirely perfect, but I also don't want to make a bad choice to go to a very disorganized university...sadly, this is what I am facing now, and it is a true struggle. I do plan to finish my studies in Canada, which will take another 2 years for a bachelors degree. I planned to apply for permanent residence after...but now that I am not sure if I'll be accepted in Canada/USA, I do not want to lose 1 full year. Another issue which I have experienced is just how fast the term goes by and there really isn't much time to soak in all of the information, nor is the information repeated anywhere else so it is easy to forget things. It's as if everything is on steroids. So studying for 6 years instead of 4, seems more reasonable to me. However, I heard that unlike in Canada/USA, in Italy there is not much hands-on practice, is that true? If yes, do you personally find it as a disadvantage? I am honestly torn from all of the possibilities, locations, and options...

Have a wonderful day, and I hope you get a chance to reply!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hi! I know this thread was from awhile back, but I still wanted to give it a shot and ask you a few questions. :)

I am European, and somehow after going to an international school I decided to pursue medicine in North America, so I am now a chemistry major in Canada; however, even though I really really like Canada as a whole, studying on PEI made me want to go back to Europe. Also, I finally realized that my chances of being accepted to a medical school here are very slim, if not impossible. So studying medicine Italy, particularly in Milan or Pavia, is currently my top option. I read that you liked your choice and now as more time has passed, do you still have the same point of view? Since you no doubt have met other international students and perhaps now that you know more about other universities, if you had a chance to study somewhere else in Europe where would that be?

I've been researching a lot, and now I am starting to doubt my options a lot. Obviously no place will be entirely perfect, but I also don't want to make a bad choice to go to a very disorganized university...sadly, this is what I am facing now, and it is a true struggle. I do plan to finish my studies in Canada, which will take another 2 years for a bachelors degree. I planned to apply for permanent residence after...but now that I am not sure if I'll be accepted in Canada/USA, I do not want to lose 1 full year. Another issue which I have experienced is just how fast the term goes by and there really isn't much time to soak in all of the information, nor is the information repeated anywhere else so it is easy to forget things. It's as if everything is on steroids. So studying for 6 years instead of 4, seems more reasonable to me. However, I heard that unlike in Canada/USA, in Italy there is not much hands-on practice, is that true? If yes, do you personally find it as a disadvantage? I am honestly torn from all of the possibilities, locations, and options...

Have a wonderful day, and I hope you get a chance to reply!

Ciao...I kind of still have the same point of view I guess, but I can really give you a more concrete answer once I start clinicals next year. At the moment it's only books and yes, the disorganization does get really annoying, and not just for me and I'm not even OCD. A lot, and I do mean a lot of students have complained about it. But some things are just ridiculous, but I'm not sure it's much better at Pavia or San Rafaelle for instance. I'm sure everyone reading this is thinking I'm making too big of a deal about such a small thing, but it really really does get to you after a while.

I don't know of anyone who "loves" Humanitas or med school in general, but there are definitely much worse places to be. I mean we all get used to things so I guess we can "like" it more but it is school.

I wouldn't have minded studying in the UK I guess, 4 years, but the process is just as tedious, but from what I hear, it's much better organized and there is something called management. But I have no interest going to the US and the UK med schools have a lot of affiliations there so they are more prone to attract student who want to go there.

The term does go by fast, but kind of the same thing here. The 6th year is a thesis so it's pretty much 5 years of academics but the amount of material is still the same as any 4 year program I would say, it's just more spread out because of the exam schedule Last year, they raised the standards, which a lot of us got annoyed at since we were the first class of which it was implemented on. It used to be 8 hours of lecture per credit, they raised it to 12...so now you learn a lot more detail which is quite unnecessary and even more tedious. We have a class this year that is 22 credits...don't even do the math, and the exam comes down to 60 questions...

As for hands on practice, I have heard that quite a bit too actually. We had a conference on how some people want to go to France for instance, but the Italian educated have a hard time with the national exam there because it is so much more practical/hands on there so the Italians struggled a lot. So like I said, I can give a better answer next year, but I'm sure that is quite a disadvantage. But that is also why a lot of people do summer internships elsewhere. A friend of mine went to Brussels for the summer for surgery and she said she learned so much there cause she got a lot of hands on experience, so there are definitely ways to get that.

I had no shot in Canada so I came here, but to an extent, I have also enjoyed it. It's pretty cool stuff to learn no? Let me know I can answer anything else, more than happy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
Jul 4, 2018
2
2
Ciao...I kind of still have the same point of view I guess, but I can really give you a more concrete answer once I start clinicals next year. At the moment it's only books and yes, the disorganization does get really annoying, and not just for me and I'm not even OCD. A lot, and I do mean a lot of students have complained about it. But some things are just ridiculous, but I'm not sure it's much better at Pavia or San Rafaelle for instance. I'm sure everyone reading this is thinking I'm making too big of a deal about such a small thing, but it really really does get to you after a while.

I don't know of anyone who "loves" Humanitas or med school in general, but there are definitely much worse places to be. I mean we all get used to things so I guess we can "like" it more but it is school.

I wouldn't have minded studying in the UK I guess, 4 years, but the process is just as tedious, but from what I hear, it's much better organized and there is something called management. But I have no interest going to the US and the UK med schools have a lot of affiliations there so they are more prone to attract student who want to go there.

The term does go by fast, but kind of the same thing here. The 6th year is a thesis so it's pretty much 5 years of academics but the amount of material is still the same as any 4 year program I would say, it's just more spread out because of the exam schedule Last year, they raised the standards, which a lot of us got annoyed at since we were the first class of which it was implemented on. It used to be 8 hours of lecture per credit, they raised it to 12...so now you learn a lot more detail which is quite unnecessary and even more tedious. We have a class this year that is 22 credits...don't even do the math, and the exam comes down to 60 questions...

As for hands on practice, I have heard that quite a bit too actually. We had a conference on how some people want to go to France for instance, but the Italian educated have a hard time with the national exam there because it is so much more practical/hands on there so the Italians struggled a lot. So like I said, I can give a better answer next year, but I'm sure that is quite a disadvantage. But that is also why a lot of people do summer internships elsewhere. A friend of mine went to Brussels for the summer for surgery and she said she learned so much there cause she got a lot of hands on experience, so there are definitely ways to get that.

I had no shot in Canada so I came here, but to an extent, I have also enjoyed it. It's pretty cool stuff to learn no? Let me know I can answer anything else, more than happy.

Thank you so much for making the time to reply to me!

Pursuing medicine in Canada/USA was really a dream, and perhaps that is what it should stay as haha...I honestly never realized how hard it was to get accepted into a medical school as an international student. No doubt that citizens like yourself have a hard time, and it's even hard for those who have been raised to go a medical school. The competition is really no joke here. Although I guess, if it was easy everyone would do it. Where do you come from in Canada? I heard a lot about how english medical programs in Italy are quite disorganized, but I also heard the same thing about the english program in my home country. So maybe the issue is rather general than local?

Has learning Italian been an issue for you? Although, I guess if you are fluent in French, it wouldn't be extremely hard. I've heard that Italy is placing a lot of emphasis on oral exams, is that true?

Can you compare doctors in Canada and Europe now that you've gained more perspective in the medical field? I don't mean to bash, but somehow in the Canadian healthcare system I have met many doctors who literally don't give a cap about their patients, nor do they posses enough knowledge to fully provide necessary care. It's come to the point of complete frustration and annoyance. Obviously no matter what university a doctor has finished, he or she is responsible for properly learning the material themselves, so maybe I just encountered the wrong percentile of the population? Canada is a great place nonetheless. On the chilly side, but great :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Thank you so much for making the time to reply to me!

Pursuing medicine in Canada/USA was really a dream, and perhaps that is what it should stay as haha...I honestly never realized how hard it was to get accepted into a medical school as an international student. No doubt that citizens like yourself have a hard time, and it's even hard for those who have been raised to go a medical school. The competition is really no joke here. Although I guess, if it was easy everyone would do it. Where do you come from in Canada? I heard a lot about how english medical programs in Italy are quite disorganized, but I also heard the same thing about the english program in my home country. So maybe the issue is rather general than local?

Has learning Italian been an issue for you? Although, I guess if you are fluent in French, it wouldn't be extremely hard. I've heard that Italy is placing a lot of emphasis on oral exams, is that true?

Can you compare doctors in Canada and Europe now that you've gained more perspective in the medical field? I don't mean to bash, but somehow in the Canadian healthcare system I have met many doctors who literally don't give a cap about their patients, nor do they posses enough knowledge to fully provide necessary care. It's come to the point of complete frustration and annoyance. Obviously no matter what university a doctor has finished, he or she is responsible for properly learning the material themselves, so maybe I just encountered the wrong percentile of the population? Canada is a great place nonetheless. On the chilly side, but great :)


I'm from Montreal and Toronto, kind of both. The issue can be general, but I think Italy specifically, when it comes to anything really is quite disorganized, I had heard that before. It took me 3 weeks to get internet....and I was lucky. Took my friend over a month, and once the guy never showed up...

Italian has not been an issue for me since I speak French and studied Spanish for 10 years so it's been smooth for me, but it's really not that hard to learn. Yea, oral exams are huge here, and for the Canadians and Americans, quite a nightmare. They can last anywhere from 15 minutes all the way up to an 1.5 hours for some poor souls. You can also fail the exam and have to retake the oral. It's kind of rough, but you get used to it. It also depends on the prof, some are really nice, some are quite hard on you if you don't know the answer. One of the profs asked me a question on the kidney, and to my fault, I said something pretty stupid cause I was quite nervous. I said "fenestrated epithelium" and I mean to say "fenestrated endothelium", but didn't really realize my mistake. Then the prof said, "how can epithelium be fenestrated????" and then I was done, lol. Failed me, and had to take the oral gain 2 weeks later.

As for healthcare, it's great here. Doctors are great, and as stated, I have heard a lot of complaints about this/that, but never about the healthcare or physicians. Most speak English quite well too. Friend of mine got really really really sick and instead of going back to the US where he's from, he opted to have the treatment here. Very cheap and now he's doing great.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Aug 25, 2019
3
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I know this thread is starting to approach "ancient" status. But I'm hoping that @Maskchamp would be willing to indulge us a little more about their experiences. Now that you have some clinical experience, do you fear that you might still be at a disadvantage when considering how much hands-on experience you are getting? Also do you have any fears of matching for residencies in any countries? Finally, a more personal question that you might not be able to weigh-in on: if you could go back in time and choose between taking 2 years off (while working) and buffing your application for a 4 year MD program (EU), or doing a straight 6 year program at Humanitas, which would you pick (in the end 6 years towards the degree either way)?

Hoping to hear back from you, and hope all is well :)
 
Last edited:

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
No problem.

Hands on-No. I actually feel like I'm at a good/above average level, but most of that is because I've gone abroad for internships, where practically I learned more. Lots do that as the theory in Italy is very very good, but very weak practically, and if you combine it with stuff abroad, you get to a good level.

Fears-yes, a bit, just like everyone around the world I guess. Citizenship can always be a challenge in Europe, but I'm hoping to work it out. Canada is very difficult as you have probably heard, and I do not want to live in the US, not under any circumstances. A lot go to the UK, which I hear is a good place to start, depending on the area. It's pretty flexible, as long as you speak the language. With good effort, you can learn a decent level of a language in about 300~400 hours.

Back in time-yes. I know even that with buffing my application, chances were very slim, not to mention much more expensive, even at 4 years vs 6 years of tuition. And I actually do not know if North American medical degrees are valid in Europe. Does anyone know?I think it depends on the country, and I wanna live in Europe, so I believe it was an ok choice.

Lemme know if any other questions, happy to answer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Aug 25, 2019
3
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
No problem.

Hands on-No. I actually feel like I'm at a good/above average level, but most of that is because I've gone abroad for internships, where practically I learned more. Lots do that as the theory in Italy is very very good, but very weak practically, and if you combine it with stuff abroad, you get to a good level.

Fears-yes, a bit, just like everyone around the world I guess. Citizenship can always be a challenge in Europe, but I'm hoping to work it out. Canada is very difficult as you have probably heard, and I do not want to live in the US, not under any circumstances. A lot go to the UK, which I hear is a good place to start, depending on the area. It's pretty flexible, as long as you speak the language. With good effort, you can learn a decent level of a language in about 300~400 hours.

Back in time-yes. I know even that with buffing my application, chances were very slim, not to mention much more expensive, even at 4 years vs 6 years of tuition. And I actually do not know if North American medical degrees are valid in Europe. Does anyone know?I think it depends on the country, and I wanna live in Europe, so I believe it was an ok choice.

Lemme know if any other questions, happy to answer.
Thank you so much for answering our questions @Maskchamp ; you're like the guardian angel of all Italian Med school hopefuls! :angelic:. I have just one more question about how internships work in Italian/any medical school: So for internships is this the same things as clinical rotations? Or are these things you do during the summer between studies (or last rotation)? Also are the internships set up by your university or do you have to look overseas yourself (e.g. Canada, where I'm from).

Thanks again for all answering all our questions!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hey, thanks for taking the time to answer all of these questions.

I finished my degree in the US (STEM degree in pre-med) and I have a solid GPA. It's enough for a US medical school, but I might want to practice medicine in the EU. I'm an EU national with an EU passport, so that shouldn't be a problem. I know that the medical programs in Italy are 6 years, but is there a way to "skip ahead"? I know that in some countries, they put you into the 3rd year if you already have a bachelor's degree.

Also, if you don't mind me asking, what are the costs involved? How do you finance your education? Ireland has 4 year MD programs that US students can use government loans to finance, but I think it's a lot more expensive than the Italian schools.

Thanks again and I wish you the best in your studies!


Costs depend on the school. For public, it's no more than 2k euros/year, which is nothing. For private, can be about 18-20k. I worked for a long time, so financing myself mostly, and some help here and there. Pavia medical school is wonderful, beautiful town, and very cheap with solid education for instance.

In private schools, doctor to student ratio is 1:1 and it's more hands on, better facilites, and better name usually. The hospitals are private so it's all well taken care of. Public schools, the facilites are not as nice, doctor to student ration is I heard about 15;1 so you don't learn as much.

I wasn't aware of the Irish schools. That's great news.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Thank you so much for answering our questions @Maskchamp ; you're like the guardian angel of all Italian Med school hopefuls! :angelic:. I have just one more question about how internships work in Italian/any medical school: So for internships is this the same things as clinical rotations? Or are these things you do during the summer between studies (or last rotation)? Also are the internships set up by your university or do you have to look overseas yourself (e.g. Canada, where I'm from).

Thanks again for all answering all our questions!

Yes, pretty much clinical rotations. You have the rotations in school starting from you 3rd year. It rotates between one surgical then one medical each semester. That's part of the curriculum. You need 100 hours in GP/IM/surgery, so 300 hours minimum to graduate and be eligible for the national exam. Those 300 hours are set up by the university.

You can do additional rotations in the summer and those are on your won, not set up by university. Depending on where you go, they can count as electives too. Canada, US (although process is more complicated), and lots of places in Europe.

lemme know of any other questions.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Aug 25, 2019
3
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Yes, pretty much clinical rotations. You have the rotations in school starting from you 3rd year. It rotates between one surgical then one medical each semester. That's part of the curriculum. You need 100 hours in GP/IM/surgery, so 300 hours minimum to graduate and be eligible for the national exam. Those 300 hours are set up by the university.

You can do additional rotations in the summer and those are on your won, not set up by university. Depending on where you go, they can count as electives too. Canada, US (although process is more complicated), and lots of places in Europe.

lemme know of any other questions.
Thanks so much for the help! Once I write the HUMAT (hopefully I do well!), and should I be accepted, I will be sure to have more questions.
 
Feb 2, 2020
1
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Hi All

I found this forum about going to med school in Italy which has been a great help because it is exactly what I want to do. I am currently a junior in high school in the US. I know that I need to take the IMAT for Italian med school but I don't know if I need to take the 2020 IMAT or the 2021 IMAT since they switched the testing month to September.

Thanks
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Feb 21, 2020
2
0
Hi All

I found this forum about going to med school in Italy which has been a great help because it is exactly what I want to do. I am currently a junior in high school in the US. I know that I need to take the IMAT for Italian med school but I don't know if I need to take the 2020 IMAT or the 2021 IMAT since they switched the testing month to September.

Thanks

Hey, I was wondering if you are planning on not attending college in the U.S. before attending medical school. You stated you are a junior in high school, which means you graduate in 2021. I am just wondering because I am not informed if attending medical school after high school is possible? Thank you!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Feb 21, 2020
2
0
Yes, pretty much clinical rotations. You have the rotations in school starting from you 3rd year. It rotates between one surgical then one medical each semester. That's part of the curriculum. You need 100 hours in GP/IM/surgery, so 300 hours minimum to graduate and be eligible for the national exam. Those 300 hours are set up by the university.

You can do additional rotations in the summer and those are on your won, not set up by university. Depending on where you go, they can count as electives too. Canada, US (although process is more complicated), and lots of places in Europe.

lemme know of any other questions.

Hello, I was wondering if you completed college before attending medical school in italy? Or did you attend medical school after graduating from high school? I hope to hear from you! Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hello, I was wondering if you completed college before attending medical school in italy? Or did you attend medical school after graduating from high school? I hope to hear from you! Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yep, I had a university degree before.
 
Feb 23, 2020
1
0
Yes, pretty much clinical rotations. You have the rotations in school starting from you 3rd year. It rotates between one surgical then one medical each semester. That's part of the curriculum. You need 100 hours in GP/IM/surgery, so 300 hours minimum to graduate and be eligible for the national exam. Those 300 hours are set up by the university.

You can do additional rotations in the summer and those are on your won, not set up by university. Depending on where you go, they can count as electives too. Canada, US (although process is more complicated), and lots of places in Europe.

lemme know of any other questions.

Hello, can you please tell more details on how you found the internship in Europe and what were the requirements. I am a second year International medical student in Italy, but I study in italian. I would like to know if the internships are only for students in the English program.
 
Last edited:

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
You find internships depending on who you know. One of the doctors I was following here gave me a contact of another one, and that's how I got it. It's a small world. There are no requirements really, as long as you can speak the language, that's what matters. If you don't, you'll have a hard time finding one. I had a friend who went to the US because one of the doctors here knew someone there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 17, 2020
3
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
You find internships depending on who you know. One of the doctors I was following here gave me a contact of another one, and that's how I got it. It's a small world. There are no requirements really, as long as you can speak the language, that's what matters. If you don't, you'll have a hard time finding one. I had a friend who went to the US because one of the doctors here knew someone there.

Thank you so much you are literally carrying this discussion!
I just have a little question if you dont mind...
Have you heard of the University of Padua and its English Medicine and Surgery program? It's supposed to have a high ranking but none of the online forums mention it so I am afraid it's one of those stories where people are admitted to a non-existent Uni and end up disappearing under mysterious circumstances lol.

I read somewhere that they offer 9 seats to non-EU students, which sounds impossible to get in, do you think its good to have this as my first choice program? I am currently in a Life Sciences program at McMaster so with a little review I should be okay for the IMAT, but I don't know what the cut-off average ends up being for a program with only 9 seats.

Thank you,
 
May 17, 2020
3
2
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Thank you so much you are literally carrying this discussion!
I just have a little question if you dont mind...
Have you heard of the University of Padua and its English Medicine and Surgery program? It's supposed to have a high ranking but none of the online forums mention it so I am afraid it's one of those stories where people are admitted to a non-existent Uni and end up disappearing under mysterious circumstances lol.

I read somewhere that they offer 9 seats to non-EU students, which sounds impossible to get in, do you think its good to have this as my first choice program? I am currently in a Life Sciences program at McMaster so with a little review I should be okay for the IMAT, but I don't know what the cut-off average ends up being for a program with only 9 seats.

Thank you,
I also kinda had the same questions it would be great if you could answer them @Maskchamp. It was more about private vs public universities. Like I understand private will have better facilities but are the public ones really that bad...

Also do you know of any website that has the whole application process laid out? It just kinda gets confusing how you register for IMAT, etc
The closet thing I found was: https://corsidilaurea.uniroma1.it/sites/default/files/documenti_ufficiali/2019/169/29895_e.pdf This explains most of the stuff but gets confusing when Universitaly gets involved.
And yeah the number of seats might be extremely low, but peeps like us who have absolutely no chance of getting into a Canadian med school(sorry for coupling you in as well :D) gotta try and get in after all we have an advantage over people straight outta high school and thanks to COVID19 we got the time as well.

PS I don't know about OSAP but here in BC studentaid has denied Humanitas, only remaining private university(as far as I know) that is listed there is Sapiezna.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
May 17, 2020
3
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I also kinda had the same questions it would be great if you could answer them @Maskchamp. It was more about private vs public universities. Like I understand private will have better facilities but are the public ones really that bad...

Also do you know of any website that has the whole application process laid out? It just kinda gets confusing how you register for IMAT, etc
The closet thing I found was: https://corsidilaurea.uniroma1.it/sites/default/files/documenti_ufficiali/2019/169/29895_e.pdf This explains most of the stuff but gets confusing when Universitaly gets involved.
And yeah the number of seats might be extremely low, but peeps like us who have absolutely no chance of getting into a Canadian med school(sorry for coupling you in as well :D) gotta try and get in after all we have an advantage over people straight outta high school and thanks to COVID19 we got the time as well.

PS I don't know about OSAP but here in BC studentaid has denied Humanitas, only remaining private university(as far as I know) that is listed there is Sapiezna.


Oh I actually didn't know about Sapienza, is it also in English and why did you pick it over a public University?
 
May 17, 2020
3
2
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I didn't chose any university yet, I am still deciding over which university. All the private ones are expensive so I was leaning towards the public ones to begin with but reading this forum and how Maskchamp said private ones are more organized (lots of posts online say this) and in general better than public ones I got a little confused.

And I found this website It has detailed instructions about Canadians who are interested in applying to an Italian med school, hope this helps others:

Maskchamp did you announce that you have a bachelors or did you just DV your high school diploma?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Thank you so much you are literally carrying this discussion!
I just have a little question if you dont mind...
Have you heard of the University of Padua and its English Medicine and Surgery program? It's supposed to have a high ranking but none of the online forums mention it so I am afraid it's one of those stories where people are admitted to a non-existent Uni and end up disappearing under mysterious circumstances lol.

I read somewhere that they offer 9 seats to non-EU students, which sounds impossible to get in, do you think its good to have this as my first choice program? I am currently in a Life Sciences program at McMaster so with a little review I should be okay for the IMAT, but I don't know what the cut-off average ends up being for a program with only 9 seats.

Thank you,
Thank you so much you are literally carrying this discussion!
I just have a little question if you dont mind...
Have you heard of the University of Padua and its English Medicine and Surgery program? It's supposed to have a high ranking but none of the online forums mention it so I am afraid it's one of those stories where people are admitted to a non-existent Uni and end up disappearing under mysterious circumstances lol.

I read somewhere that they offer 9 seats to non-EU students, which sounds impossible to get in, do you think its good to have this as my first choice program? I am currently in a Life Sciences program at McMaster so with a little review I should be okay for the IMAT, but I don't know what the cut-off average ends up being for a program with only 9 seats.

Thank you,

Pleasure.

Do you mean Pavia? Pavia is a great school, and the town is really cute and only about 30km from Milano. They have a lot to offer and it's a public school, so dirt cheap.

I think it's more than 9 seats, I'm pretty sure it's about 30 or 40 and for non-EUs. Stay in the north so list any programs that are Rome and north of it. You can have Pavia as your first choice, it's a good idea I think. I know people who are there and are quite happy.
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I didn't chose any university yet, I am still deciding over which university. All the private ones are expensive so I was leaning towards the public ones to begin with but reading this forum and how Maskchamp said private ones are more organized (lots of posts online say this) and in general better than public ones I got a little confused.

And I found this website It has detailed instructions about Canadians who are interested in applying to an Italian med school, hope this helps others:

Maskchamp did you announce that you have a bachelors or did you just DV your high school diploma?
I have my bachelors, so I started after I finished university in Canada. I know that website quite well and the guy who runs it. It's informative and updated frequently.
 
May 17, 2020
3
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Pleasure.

Do you mean Pavia? Pavia is a great school, and the town is really cute and only about 30km from Milano. They have a lot to offer and it's a public school, so dirt cheap.

I think it's more than 9 seats, I'm pretty sure it's about 30 or 40 and for non-EUs. Stay in the north so list any programs that are Rome and north of it. You can have Pavia as your first choice, it's a good idea I think. I know people who are there and are quite happy.

Oh no it seems Uni of Padua is different than Pavia, but I could not even find Padua in the world directory of medical schools, so I think I am sticking with the University of Roma.
As for Roma (Sapienza) the list of non-EU applicants that were accepted had a minimum IMAT of 49.30 which I think is not hard at all (correct me if I'm wrong), and according to Google their tuition costs are about 2.5k Euros, and they offer financial aid.

What have you heard about Medicine at this University? good choice? I'm researching every University because I heard that applicants are only considered for their top choice program, so a choice with 10 available seats (Roma) may be a little risky...
 
May 17, 2020
3
2
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I have my bachelors, so I started after I finished university in Canada
Sorry I meant to ask about when you have to submit the notarized copy of your high school grades and diploma. Did you also attach your bachelors transcript?
Because the universities only care about grade 12, does declaring that you already have a bachelors make any difference?
Also did you start you embassy stuff after giving IMAT or before?
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Oh I actually didn't know about Sapienza, is it also in English and why did you pick it over a public University?

Yea, sapienza is in English. I don't know, just kinda fell into Milan and then then as I learned more, I decided to give it a shot up here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Oh no it seems Uni of Padua is different than Pavia, but I could not even find Padua in the world directory of medical schools, so I think I am sticking with the University of Roma.
As for Roma (Sapienza) the list of non-EU applicants that were accepted had a minimum IMAT of 49.30 which I think is not hard at all (correct me if I'm wrong), and according to Google their tuition costs are about 2.5k Euros, and they offer financial aid.

What have you heard about Medicine at this University? good choice? I'm researching every University because I heard that applicants are only considered for their top choice program, so a choice with 10 available seats (Roma) may be a little risky...

50 on the IMAT isn't difficult, very doable. Sapienza is very solid and quite well known around Europe. Rome is just much more chaotic and so much less organized though, but beautiful.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Sorry I meant to ask about when you have to submit the notarized copy of your high school grades and diploma. Did you also attach your bachelors transcript?
Because the universities only care about grade 12, does declaring that you already have a bachelors make any difference?
Also did you start you embassy stuff after giving IMAT or before?

Yea, I did, which was insanely annoying, rubbish. I didn't attach my bachelors transcript, they didn't care about that. Declaring a bachelors makes no difference. I started my embassy stuff after getting accepted, the bureaucracy is insane, like insane, so I didn't want to start the process prior to not knowing whether I was accepted.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Mar 31, 2020
3
0
Hello @Maskchamp, I would like to ask you a few questions if you don't mind.

1. With how far you've come, are you considering doing your residency in Italy? If yes, why?
2. If no, what places do you have in mind?
I'll really appreciate your opinion, because I'm thinking it would be a great idea to do my residency in Europe. To be honest, I like quiet places (not a great population, beautiful, great weather)

But that's not to say I want to compromise on quality, lots of practice and access to guidance are of importance to me, but just the right amount of pressure, a calm and happy environment is pretty important too, for an epic residential journey.

So from your knowledge and experience, what countries would you suggest to non EU student? Which language will be easier to pick up? (I'm pretty interested in learning a new language)

There are just so many, I'm at loss on what to do. I hope this post is not too long, I'm sorry.

P.S, I'm currently a medical student in Russia. (if that's useful information).
Thank you.
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hello @Maskchamp, I would like to ask you a few questions if you don't mind.

1. With how far you've come, are you considering doing your residency in Italy? If yes, why?
2. If no, what places do you have in mind?
I'll really appreciate your opinion, because I'm thinking it would be a great idea to do my residency in Europe. To be honest, I like quiet places (not a great population, beautiful, great weather)

But that's not to say I want to compromise on quality, lots of practice and access to guidance are of importance to me, but just the right amount of pressure, a calm and happy environment is pretty important too, for an epic residential journey.

So from your knowledge and experience, what countries would you suggest to non EU student? Which language will be easier to pick up? (I'm pretty interested in learning a new language)

There are just so many, I'm at loss on what to do. I hope this post is not too long, I'm sorry.

P.S, I'm currently a medical student in Russia. (if that's useful information).
Thank you.

No problem.

1. I would consider it, if all else didn't work out, but it would depend heavily on where in Italy.
2. Most likely going back to Canada, or perhaps France, absolute last resort is USA.

At this point, it's hard to suggest anything as I haven't graduated yet. It really depends on what you're looking for and location wise and your specialty. Some places are better for some than others.

I would say any Romance language is relatively 'easy' to pick up, especially versus German for instance. The salaries are higher in some places, and low in others, like in Italy, but the life quality is great. It's impossible to figure out before your 5th year I think.
 
Sep 8, 2020
3
0
No problem.

1. I would consider it, if all else didn't work out, but it would depend heavily on where in Italy.
2. Most likely going back to Canada, or perhaps France, absolute last resort is USA.

At this point, it's hard to suggest anything as I haven't graduated yet. It really depends on what you're looking for and location wise and your specialty. Some places are better for some than others.

I would say any Romance language is relatively 'easy' to pick up, especially versus German for instance. The salaries are higher in some places, and low in others, like in Italy, but the life quality is great. It's impossible to figure out before your 5th year I think.
Hello, thanks for your help. I was thinking of applying for a scholarship there but on their web page, you have to maintain a 27/30 to keep it. Can that be done for all six years? How difficult is it? Also, where's the easiest place for residency after school?
 
Sep 25, 2020
3
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Hi @Maskchamp.

Thank you for all the great information so far! I was curious as to how difficult it is to find a residency in Europe or if you believe it would be quite easy as a med student in Italy? I saw that you're thinking of returning to Canada or going to France for residency--I was curious as to what is driving these locations for residency? Is it difficult to return to Canada or as difficult as you originally thought?
 

Maskchamp

2+ Year Member
Jan 12, 2017
84
51
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
It depends on the country, some of them it's easier, others have stricter restrictions. So much of it is about the language, everywhere wants a B2 level at least.

Just kind of lifestyle and the fact that I speak the languages drive me towards that I guess.

Yes, apparently it is, very annoyingly difficult to return to Canada, it's really a shame, can't put my finger on it.
 
Jan 1, 2021
6
0
Hello @Maskchamp ,

I am heavily considering going to medical schools in Italy, and still in the process of choosing which one I want to go the most. I"d really appreciate it if you could answer my questions:)

I know that B2 level of Italian is required in order to go into third year in Italian public medical schools, and I was wondering if it goes the same for private schools. Also, I was wondering if you've also sat for the IMAT test.
I also have a little question about Cura Italia which was implemented due to the pandemic! According to articles I've read, it seems like the Italian government has abolished the medical licensing exam in Italy. Would this mean anyone who graduate from Italian med schools can practice medicine in Italy without no further examinations from now on? Finally, I have a question about going to the UK after graduating from Italian medical school. like USMLE, is there a particular exam you have to write in order to practice medicine in the UK? and is it easier to get a job in the UK than in Canada or the US with a MD degree from Italy?

Thank you!
 
About the Ads

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.