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Should I even apply or shoot for the Caribbean :(

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ]' started by zurc2014, 09.25.14.

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  1. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Hi, I wanted to know if you guys think I should apply this upcoming cycle or are my chances shot at this point. I am recently graduated and have too many credits under my belt to raise my gpa in a reasonable amount of time.
    Stats:
    2.85 cgpa/sgpa
    35 mcat
    AA urm
    non traditional (32 yo/parent/extremely underserved)
    4 years of bio-medical bench research w/ 1 paper published in top journal
    1 year of clinical research w/ 4 papers published
    8 years hospital experience
    Plus many years of leadership, community service, shadowing blah blah blah

    I also have letters from some top docs at a Texas medical school that I work at.

    I have saved up a ton of money from working and have about 35-40 schools on my list (MD and TCOM for DO) including all of the HBCUs. Should I put my bid in or will I be wasting a few grand for nothing? I am thinking about doing TCOMs medical masters as well. Should I apply to carib's? Advice? Thanks guys.
     
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  3. Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    Man the only thing killing you is that GPA. Either a handful of retakes (especially for DO school) or a masters degree will open countless doors for you. You really at least have to get it above like 3.0 for DO school (at some schools its 3.2), or like a 3.3 for MD.
     
  4. pharmolu

    pharmolu 5+ Year Member

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    I would say do a post bacc and apply, a 35 3.0 urm would definitely get you somewhere
     
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  5. Afford

    Afford

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    Do a post bacc and I think you can get into an MD school with your MCAT/URM/ECs.
     
  6. Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I guess I should add "or a post-bacc." I totally agree... Basically you just need something to get you over that 3.0 hump, obviously the higher above the hump you go, the better your chances are. Also make sure that your MCAT does not expire in the time while taking other classes. That 35 is sick haha.
     
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  7. Lucca

    Lucca Will Walk Rope for Sandwich 2+ Year Member

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    You should definitely apply. TCOM and the other DOs will be far more forgiving of your high MCAt, low GPA / non-traditional background. In fact, with those LORs I wouldn't be surprised if some of the TX MD looked your way, if you are a resident of TX. Your gpa is certainly low but if you can explain why it is so low and can back it up with all the post-grad work you seem to have done (research + hospital work experience) I would find it hard to believe that you wouldn't be accepted somewhere.

    Good luck! 35-40 schools is a lot of schools. If I were you, personally, I would cut it down to around 20 and use that saved money for travel expenses, but this is all about what is best for you and your family so it's absolutely your choice - I just think that many schools is a bit excessive and may tax your ability to write quality II and flying around all over for interviews.

    Also, I recommend applying next cycle, it is already pretty late in this cycle and that will take away from your chances of getting an interview / II.
     
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  8. SnakeOilForSale

    SnakeOilForSale Everyday I'm hustlin 2+ Year Member

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    Being honest, your chances aren't great. What you have holistically is good, but your gpa alone is the dealbreaker. That is really the only factor here that will stop you.

    People may disagree with me, but imo, not pursuing medicine is better than going carib. I won't go into the nitty gritty figures, but understand that you will owe a lot of money and have a low chance of matching into a us residency. Without residency, you cannot practice medicine and you will be saddled with debt. It is not worth it. Don't think you'll be the lucky one to get matched because that's a huge gamble to base your life on.

    So, realistic options here:

    1) pursue another field such as pa

    2) retake those science classes and apply do with grade replacement

    3) do a smp or some such and take a gap year or two to prove you can perform well academically and apply md.

    You shouldn't apply this cycle as it's very unlikely you will get in with that gpa. Don't ruin your confidence and waste money. Figure out why you were performing at that level and fix the problem at the root cause, because it's not going to get easier after entering medical school. If you ask me, waiting a cycle or two while retaking, then applying DO is a good plan of action.
     
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  9. Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I agree with the thing about Carib... that door is closing

    Also look into Podiatry. That is truly a gem in the medical field, you would absolutely get in.
     
  10. claduva94

    claduva94 2+ Year Member

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    I think riven your MCAT and URM status you may have a shot. Just not really this cycle. You are really late.
     
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  11. Plecopotamus

    Plecopotamus 2+ Year Member

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    When is your MCAT going to expire. I would work my butt off to bring up that GPA with re-takes and then apply whenever the latest is that you can apply with the MCAT score you have. There are other URMs with extremely disadvantaged backgrounds applying with much better GPAs. While I can see institutions forgiving a low GPA, that does not typically mean one under 3.0. Even if your GPA remains lower than is typically competitive, you also have to prove that you can NOW perform at a higher level -- I would typically recommend at least 2 semesters of full and rigorous courseload to prove this point. Have you already done that and still have below a 3.0? Can you give a bigger picture of your GPA (i.e. is it where it is b/c of a 0.0 during freshman year, etc.)?

    By upcoming cycle, i assume you mean submitting a primary next Summer not now. If you're talking about now -- you're so ridiculously late that it would be throwing all your hard earned cash out the window.
     
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  12. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    I'm talking about the upcoming cycle (may 2015) plus I would apply super early if I went that route.
     
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  13. claduva94

    claduva94 2+ Year Member

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  14. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Just got the mcat score this summer. GPA is low due to family responsibilities which I mentioned in my ps. I have taken the extra classes (biochem, upperlevel genetics, ect.) but mathematically it is near impossible with the amount of credits I have already. Will applying broadly early, and applying to SMPs simultaneously next cycle be a good idea? I am really looking at TCOMs masters but that still wont change my undergrad gpa.
     
  15. Snoopy2006

    Snoopy2006 7+ Year Member

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    The Caribbean route isn't a good one. You're just more likely to end up with massive debt. Considering you're 32 and have dependents, that's a very risky path. The thing that gives me pause is your MCAT is fantastic. That indicates to me that you're good at standardized testing, and although the correlation isn't perfect, it's reasonable to think that with some hard work you'll do well on the Steps as well.

    Your non-trad story will help you as well. That sub 3.0 GPA is really the only killer. When you only have 1 weakness in your application, the smartest thing to do would be to shore up that one area. A post-bacc makes sense for you. Is the GPA from college many years ago or recently? What's the reason for the low GPA? It doesn't match up with your strong MCAT scores. If there were extenuating circumstances and you could put forth 1-2 years of good grades in a post-bacc, do it.

    You never know unless you try. Throwing in the towel and going Caribbean would be a mistake. Your application is strong in several areas, it would be a waste to head to the islands without trying. The best option is a post-bacc, and apply to DO programs as well.


    Edit: just saw your more recent post above. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "family responsibilities" - was there a specific event that distracted you, or is it just the ongoing general responsibilities of having children? If it's the latter, I wouldn't mention that during interviews - that would torpedo your application. Adcoms are trying to figure out which applicants can't handle the rigors of a med school curriculum. The only time people get in with very low GPAs is when their application is strong in other areas (like yours) and they have a legitimate reason to explain their low GPA and explain why that issue has been resolved and won't affect them in medical school (e.g. personal tragedy). If you don't have a clear way to explain the GPA (and don't have a recent upwards trend in your grades) I'd definitely recommend that post-bacc to bring the GPA up.
     
    Last edited: 09.25.14
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  16. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Just graduated this past May and the low gpa is due to family reasons plus over working to provide.
     
  17. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    Will those reasons go away with medical school? How will you provide?
     
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  18. PreciousHamburgers

    PreciousHamburgers 2+ Year Member

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    How old is that GPA? How old is that MCAT? I actually think you have a shot if you apply early and strategically. If you could do a post-bacc, and really do well, A LOT of doors would open up for you, though.

    EDIT: Also, do not go Caribbean. Not the main reason, but I don't see how a parent could even swing that...
     
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  19. Snoopy2006

    Snoopy2006 7+ Year Member

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    If I were you, I'd just apply. While I'm sure you know the odds, you have a strong MCAT and what sounds like it's probably a compelling story with real-world perspective. While many schools will screen out your GPA, those that take a closer like at your personal statement and overall application may really like what they see. If not, post-bacc to improve the GPA and re-apply. Best of luck, I really hope it works out for you.
     
  20. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Meep Meep Meep 5+ Year Member

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    "1 year of clinical research w/ 4 papers published"

    Now I feel like a slacker. Guess it's time for me to work harder.
     
  21. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    There are no acceptable excuses for low stats in this process. I wouldn't bother repeating them here or in a PS. Plenty of people with good scores also had outside obligations, and as mentioned med school is going to be even more involved. I would take the classes you need to bring up your GPA, especially for the DO places, that do grade replacement. You aren't going to be ready for 2015, probably. Caribbean isn't a viable option anymore, so put that out of your mind.
     
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  22. Mr Roboto

    Mr Roboto 2+ Year Member

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    I'd say apply. Apply selectively and broadly and you should get it.

     
  23. Shootinblanks

    Shootinblanks

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    Honestly, what does it hurt to apply. You sound like a very unique applicant if you can explain in your application why your gpa is low you should be able to get some interviews and even acceptance. You have a really good mcat score and your ec seem to be very good. So I would say go for it, nothing bad can happen from applying. I would also agree, maybe get a masters or post-bac to show that you have matured and are intelligent enough to get good grades
     
  24. whatbout2morrow

    whatbout2morrow Is there anything you would not do for your family 7+ Year Member

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    I would do the post bacc at TCOM. Grads of that program end up in pretty much every medical school in Texas each year. It will be more cost-efficient in the long-run as well to go to a Texas school as opposed to an OOS school.
     
  25. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Nah.. Publishing is a joke in clinical research.
    Sounds good. Hope I can get into that program though.
     
  26. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    Have you done anything to convince adcoms, or for that matter yoruself, that you actually have the ability to succeed for any length of time in an academically challenging curriculum?

    How would you answer that question in an interview?

    That's what's missing. A high GPA in a post bacc would address that.
     
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  27. Plecopotamus

    Plecopotamus 2+ Year Member

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    You didn't answer my question about the nature of the low GPA -- does it come from chronic B-'s and C's or was there 1 really bad streak of F's? What does your last 3 semesters worth of coursework look like.

    It sounds like you think your excuse of family obligations as an underserved URM is far more unique than it is. Even at schools that are specifically seeking to give opportunities to such an applicant, you won't be the one whose gpa they overlook or who they choose to take if you aren't convincing that you will succeed in medical school -- having good reasons why you did poorly in parts of undergrad is not the same as having good reasons to believe you will do better in med school. You need evidence (not just your word) that you're able to rise to the occasion, unhindered, now. Even if the GPA won't budge much, you absolutely need that.
     
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  28. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Last few semesters looks poor (about 3.2 over last few semesters). Its low due to chronic B's and C's. I'm being vague due to anonymity. I do not think that my urm status makes me "more unique than it is." Really have no clue how you make that leap.
     
  29. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    It can hurt. You don't want to end up a reapplicant. This is a process you want to do once. Get your ducks in a row before you pull the trigger. One shot, one kill. If you have one glaring fixable aspect of your application, places are going to expect you to have made an attempt to fix it, not hope you can explain it away by saying you had a lot if other stuff going on. So yeah, it can hurt. Fix things and then apply. Med school will still be there.
     
  30. Mr Roboto

    Mr Roboto 2+ Year Member

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    In before thread devolves into "it's unfair that URMs get in with lower stats"
     
  31. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    Well the reality is that very few people with your stats get in. If you think you can be one of the few with those stats who can succeed, then there has to be something unique or impressive about you.

    Bottom line is that to get into med school you need to convince adcoms of 3 things:

    1) That you have the ability to succeed in an incredibly relentless, difficult medical school curriculum.
    2) That you have the clinical and shadowing experience to know enough about the profession and experience to be sure that this is what you want to do with your life.
    3) That you are an unusually good, decent human being willing to devote his life to the service of his fellow man.

    You seem to have 2 and 3. But with your GPA, and no apparent history of significant academic success, you are completely lacking #1. Your MCAT score tells us that you're smart, but your consistently low academic performance dooms you.


    BTW: My stats were 2.8/35.
     
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  32. harmony2

    harmony2

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    it ultimately depends on how you would feel about having that carib md hanging on your wall or on the mantelpiece. would you see it as a bad mark, or could you care less once you started makin' the bucks ? it's ultimately a personal choice.
     
  33. Mr Roboto

    Mr Roboto 2+ Year Member

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    No. It's more important to consider that the vast majority of students who matriculate at a Caribbean school never graduate, and that many graduates are unable to obtain a residency.

     
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  34. Snoopy2006

    Snoopy2006 7+ Year Member

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    And what was the result of your application? Based on your status, it sounds like it was successful.
    This is genuinely terrible advice.

    OP: I think your question has probably been answered by now. Since there's no recent upward trend in grades and it's more of a chronic issue, I would focus on a strong post-bacc performance before applying.
     
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  35. gsjloynesyj

    gsjloynesyj

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    I just think that many schools is a bit excessive and may tax your ability to write quality II and flying around all over for interviews.[​IMG]
     
  36. jonnythan

    jonnythan Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul 2+ Year Member

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    It was ultimately successful, after two cycles. I posted ~50 credits of 3.9 GPA coursework before being accepted, though. I think that's key: I had to establish that I could successfully handle coursework over a period of time.
     
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  37. Snoopy2006

    Snoopy2006 7+ Year Member

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    Completely agree. Glad it worked out for you.
     
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  38. Goro

    Goro 5+ Year Member

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    100% agree with my young colleague.


     
  39. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Agree. Nobody will get to care what degree you have hanging on the wall if you never get a residency certificate to hang next to it. That's the problem with Caribbean med school -- you can pay a Lot of money and spend four years of your life and still not be able to ever land a residency or become a doctor.
     
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  40. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Thanks everyone for the advice. My ultimate goal was MD/PhD but I kinda threw that in the trash after calculating my gpa. By the time I apply I will have 6 publications, 5 years of research in genetics, dermatology and cardiology at UTSW and countless poster/oral presentations. If I do a one year post bacc and raise my gpa to a 3.0-3.2 or so, would that be enough for such a program or should I not push it?
     
    Last edited: 09.26.14
  41. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    What do you need the PhD for? Most of the time you can do the research you want with just the MD (or maybe even DO) and the PhD is overkill. Think carefully if you really need it. If you can up your GPA above the 3.0 mark you probably open more doors. But I suspect you like the sound of MD/PhD more than have a real career need.
     
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  42. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    I think it's a lot of wanting to do it all by premeds. More the pie in the sky - I want do clinical and research as part of my career types (before reality hits them when they're a grad student). I also think free paid tuition also factors into it as well as the possibility of getting certain competitive specialties with an MD/PhD. I think @Neuronix on his blog has said this last reason is probably no longer accurate for today's medical student.
     
  43. Neuronix

    Neuronix working like a dog SDN Advisor SDN Administrator 10+ Year Member

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    Three issues here:

    A GPA of 3.0 - 3.2 is marginal for medical school in general. MD/PhDs care about research, but they are at competitive medical schools. So you need to be competitive for their medical school (with some leniency in general for shadowing/volunteering/other ECs) and then add research on top of that. I'm not saying it would be impossible with a 3.2/35/several years of basic research, but I'd have a backup plan in mind. It does help that you're an AA URM. I honestly have no data on how much that helps.

    Your research sounds like clinical research to me, though I don't really know based on what you wrote. MD/PhD programs are designed almost exclusively for basic science researchers. Publications are unimportant in general in MD/PhD admissions. Solid bench research experience is important. Thus, your research may not be a factor at all.

    You state your reason for the low GPA as just chronic Bs and Cs without compelling reasons. I've seen my share of undergrads go do SMPs or other master's assuming that they'll turn it around and get As. SMPs don't just hand out As, in many ways they are even more competitive, as you're now competing with a bunch of hypercompetitive pre-meds. You need to make sure whatever issues are holding you back from As before contemplating an SMP or other advanced education, or just skip it entirely.

    Your options for med school to me are:
    1. Retake your lowest courses and up your GPA for DO programs (sGPA and cGPA above 3.0), then apply low tier/state school MD and DO.
    2. Do the SMP but really commit to all As and then apply to MD and DO programs.
    3. If you really have the basic research, then you could add MD/PhD to the mix with #2 above.

    I'd view Carrib as last resort with the worsening residency crunch, and it sounds like you really don't need carrib if you can get some decent grades.

    Agreed. MD/PhD programs are designed to produced majority career researchers. Whether they achieve that goal or not is a discussion we have frequently in the MD/PhD forum. But that is the goal, and that should also be your goal when investing 4+ years of your life on that PhD.

    Reality hits us many, many times ;)

    I agree that free med school is a factor, but honestly I wouldn't have done MD/PhD if not for the free money. You're taking away 4 years of possible attending salary and committing to academics (at least figuratively), so you should have some financial help. I was poor growing up and had no family support, so the money was a nice part of it.

    As for whether a PhD helps you get a competitive specialty--it does. But it's similar to MD/PhD admissions. You still need to be competitive for academic programs within the specialty based on step scores, clinical grades, and interview personality. With a low step score, you will get filtered out by most programs without even an interview. Your PhD will be of marginal benefit if not related to the residency specialty you apply into, and you may find MD-only types with 1 year of targeted research beating you for interviews and on your rank list.
     
  44. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    Correct, I'm talking about the ones who think they can game the system, by not having great board scores, thinking their MD/PhD with research pubs will do the trick. MDs have caught on and just do a year of clinical research some getting a "Distinction in Research" or an "MS in Clinical Research". CCLCM's med school (with Case and Cleveland Clinic) automatically has them do a year of research.
     
  45. Neuronix

    Neuronix working like a dog SDN Advisor SDN Administrator 10+ Year Member

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    I don't necessarily blame the MD/PhDs for this. My program director used to say "You're an MD/PhD from a top program. You'll get whatever residency you want. All you have to do is pass step 1." For years my program would brag about how everyone got their 1st choice every year.

    Residencies got a lot more competitive just in the 8 years I was an MD/PhD student. The wakeup call for everyone was year 6 for me when 4 graduates failed to match. There are still a lot of program directors and other higher ups in the MD/PhD community who have their heads in the sand about these issues. The residency guidance within these programs can at times very weak, and many students don't bother with the reality that is SDN until it's too late (or never).

    That's why I wrote this paper: http://www.neuronix.org/2012/06/effects-of-score-creep-trends-in.html but the usual journals would not even review it for publication.
     
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  46. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    I wonder what they told everyone when those 4 MD/PhDs didn't match or they just pushed it under the rug. I guess the one reason people don't feel as sorry for them is bc they have their tuition full paid for as well as receiving a stipend (so no debt) and they have a much better segue into industry. I think the common emotion is to feel that since one is doing an MD/PhD those extra 4 years will be "worth it" in terms of getting a coveted spot in a niche specialty, unlike your colleagues who did only 4 years of the MD - but that's not always the case. After all MD/PhDs are treated "special" in a lot of instances, so they might expect special treatment in the match. With score creep rising so fast a 6 year difference from Step 1 to time of application (a difference of 4 from the normal route), can make a big difference.

    I'd say the one big exception is Radiation Oncology - where it almost feels like you have to have an MD/PhD to get into Rad Onc. lol.
     
  47. Neuronix

    Neuronix working like a dog SDN Advisor SDN Administrator 10+ Year Member

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    Under the rug. See: http://www.neuronix.org/2011/07/nrmp-puts-out-charting-outcomes-in.html

    This is very uncommon (<10% of grads).

    Only about 20% of rad oncs have a PhD (see: http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Charting-Outcomes-2014-Final.pdf). That is the highest, but not very different than pathology. About an additional 20% have some other degree like a master's. It's a common myth that you need a PhD or extensive research to match in rad onc. Every year I see bubbly, decent step 1 (>230) with high class rank applicants with minimal to no research match at strong programs in rad onc. Every year MD/PhDs fail to match in rad onc (3 of 39 in the most recent Charting Outcomes data). Matching is certainly more nuanced than most fourth years seem to portray it.
     
  48. Conflagration

    Conflagration Avatar from MeluuArts of dA. 2+ Year Member

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    Have you retaken classes before, OP? If you have, you may have a higher cGPA than you have posted for AACOMAS/DO schools.

    It is later in the cycle, though. If you clean up those C's by doing some retakes, you could definitely get in next cycle.

    You did very well on the MCAT, so you obviously understand some material. It can't hurt to retake; and if you're an older applicant, you may have to retake some classes anyway.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  49. Jamiu22

    Jamiu22 7+ Year Member

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    OP: Posted the below in a different thread, but I saw you are in exact same situation that I was in 4yrs ago, except my MCAT wasn't as high as yours...it's all up to you; and nothing should stop you from pursuing your dreams, but set realistic expections - ready to pick yourself up the moment you fall.


    ___________________________________________
    This thread makes me smile a little bit (in retrospect now that I'm a 4th yr medical student); I had always thought about becoming a doctor, but I was sure I could never attain that dream - the thought was that I was not smart enough. Also I'm certain that I probably have an undiagnosed ADHD, that has gotten better with age.

    During my first 2 semesters in CC, I attained a 2.5 GPA majoring in pre-engineering and by the time I transferred to a 4yr college, I had managed to bump it up to a 2.67; I finished my engineering degree and in a round about way, enrolled in an Engineering masters program (took some courses, busted my butt to get a 3.8 GPA, and was unconditionally admitted). I finished the Masters program with a 3.5 GPA. Now after working as an Engineer for a number of years, I decided to give medicine a try.

    I went back for my post-bac at a CC - attained a 3.9 GPA bringing my AMCAS cGPA to 2.85 (sGPA:3.1) and AACOMAS cGPA ~3.4 (sGPA:3.5); my MCAT was average for accepted applicants to allopathic schools... so i thought at 31yrs of age, why not give it a shot and just apply. I was always interested in a highly competitive surgical subspecialty, so I thought going the allopathic route was the better option for me. The thought was to apply to allopathic schools the 1st year and if I didn't get accepted, I would apply to probably all osteopathic schools the next year.

    I'm URM, so I thought, why not try all HBCU schools and about 40-something other schools -after all, it only takes one bite and I could become a doc. So in total, I applied to about 50 schools - I got 8 interviews (1 HBCU and 7 other schools plasted across the US); my interviews went well for the most part and for the most part, the adcoms just wanted to know why such a poor academic showing during my UG years - I simply told them the truth - I was young and was not a serious student. At an interview (at a school I liked a lot), one of the interviewer hadn't read my application before hand, so when he opened up my file - he did a double take at the file and proceeded to ask how and why I did so poorly. Mind you, this was about 3mins into the interview, after my spiel, he decided that he would just talk to the other interviewer while ignoring me throughout the interview. After the interviewers finished their discussion, they told me I could leave - that was the most demoralizing interview/experience I've had to date. Wasted plane ticket, wasted hotel room cost, wasted rental car and a new suite - just to be laughed at and completely ignored. I could have saved them the time by not evening applying here. But, of my 8 interviews, that was the only one that felt awkward - the rest gave me a shot, they didn't have to, but I'm glad they did. In all, I got rejected at every program except one - to my utter disbelief, one bit after-all. I got accepted to an allopathic (MD) program - the HBCU school that interviewed me.

    Once I started medical school, I felt that I had something to prove; I needed to shake that monkey of my back; and I did. I'm graduating from medical school in the top 10% of my class (both in grades and boards - USMLE step exams). I'm currently applying to that surgical sub-specialty and have interviews already lined up.

    The moral of the story is to never give up! With every breadth, you never give up; even when everyone one around you laughs at you for being overly optimistic, listen to your heart and your head and give it your best shot. You just never know what the future holds.

    -------------------------------------------------
     
  50. zurc2014

    zurc2014 2+ Year Member

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    Thanks for the reply. Most of my research has been basic sciences at the bench (genetics, biology, biochemistry and cardiovascular) for 3+ years. I just recently started doing clinical research to get a feel for the different aspects of medical research and to diversify my experience. All of my posters and oral presentations (and one pub) was in hard bench research. I didnt go into detail about why my grades are low to remain anonymous but I have discussed it in my PS and it is what it is. I have calculated what my gpa would be if I take three semesters worth of a post bacc and the highest is 3.1xx My mcat will still be good but will this gpa suffice for MD or MD/PhD programs? I am a Texas resident and don't want to drag my child all over the state if possible so I would really be limited to TCOM as far as DO schools go. The Carribs are certainly my hail mary but I think I'm scratching that idea now. Since most of my family lives in Dallas UTSW is my top choice and I have some kind of ties (although moderate) with some members on admissions there. I asked them about the SMP at TCOM and basically they told me they dont recognize it and it may be good for DO schools only. Obviously they don't know how good this program is but that did kind of discourage me from TCOMs smp. Another problem is TCOM DOES NOT do the grade replacement like other DO schools :(
     
    Last edited: 09.27.14
  51. radkat101

    radkat101 2+ Year Member

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    I would do TCOM's med-sci program. There are a ton of med-scis in the C/O 2018, and others definitely went off to MD schools when they got out of the program. UTSW may not recognize it, but other state MD schools surely do. You can PM me if you have any questions.
     

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