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Should I even bother applying?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Kilgore, May 16, 2007.

  1. Kilgore

    Kilgore Junior Member 2+ Year Member

    12
    0
    Jul 6, 2006
    I'm a soon to be senior, in the process now of deciding whether or not it's even worth it to apply to med school. Just to give you a brief summary of myself, my undergrad gpa is a 3.51 and my bcpm gpa is a 3.2. I am majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology. I attend a large public university and am in the honors program. During my years here, I have received 3 C+'s in bio 1 &2, and biochemistry. I haven't taken my mcat yet, but have registered for the july 24 date. I took cell bio this semester and improved slightly on my grades...got a B in the class. I have approached 3 of my professors and none of them guaranteed that they could provide me with a "strong" recommendation. In fact, my physics prof told me that since he didn't know me personally, he would only agree to countersign a letter that a TA had written for me. Another prof, my cell bio teacher, told me that he could not write a strong letter because I only received a B in his class. My extracurriculars are not extraordinary...president of a club i founded, some volunteer hours at a hospital, and research ( no publications yet). So that is basically my entire profile (i apologize...that wasn't brief). And on top of that, since i'm taking my mcat so late, i probably won't be able to complete my application until end of august. Anyways, i just feel like everything is pretty much going against my favor and i just don't know whether or not it would be worth it to spend money on schools that probably won't even look at me. Do you think it's best to wait and pursue a masters degree first then apply or should i continue with my plans to apply? Any advice/insight would be much appreciated! Thanks!
     
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  3. spicedmanna

    spicedmanna Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Take the MCAT and call us when you've gotten your score...

    On a more serious note, it's hard to judge chances without your MCAT score. Your UGPA and BCPM GPA are below average. They aren't that bad, however. Assuming an MCAT score that is at or above average (30+) you do have shot if you applied broadly and early, including your state schools and schools in less desireable geographic areas. If you aren't in a hurry to apply, then you could benefit from a couple of fulltime semesters of advanced undergraduate science classes to pull up that BCPM and demonstrate your academic ability. You could also use this extra time to beef up your volunteer, community service, and clinical experiences and possibly get stronger letters. These would all work to optimize your chances and options for when you do apply. However, assuming a 30+ MCAT, you are not out of the running as is, it just wouldn't be optimal. Basically, it's best to apply when you feel ready and when you are at your strongest.

    Good luck.
     
  4. the negative 1

    the negative 1 Bovie to "war crimes" please 10+ Year Member

    1,088
    14
    Aug 14, 2004
    Charm City
    I agree with spicedmanna. If you're not in the best position to apply now, what's the harm in waiting another year to boost your credentials. Just because it seems like everyone else applies after junior year, doesn't mean you have to as well. Trust me, it's not worth the time and cost to apply to medical school if you're betting your chances on an admittedly sub-par application.

    You should be concerned that you don't have anyone who can write you at least two strong letters of recommendation. Work hard in a few classes next year and you'll legitimately earn those LORs you need.

    If you feel confident in your ability to score well on the MCAT this July, then go ahead and take it. The scores will still be valid if you choose to hold off for a year.

    In what area where you thinking of pursuing a master's degree? Are you really committed to being a medical doctor or is advanced graduate training also appealing to you? Think your options over carefully.
     

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